Welcome to Falkland-Bruce School

The principal of Falkland School

Source:

Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection # 741.14.e.19

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

The image is of the principal of the school, [Gaston Monk, Sr.?] who is standing next to a sign indicating “Welcome to Falkland-Bruce School.” The date on the negative envelop is April 22, 1958. The image is one of many that recorded the events in Pitt Co. from the 1920’s to 1960’s. David Jordan Whichard and Julian R. Whichard founded the newspaper in 1881. The Daily Reflector Negative Collection was a gift from Mr. Jordan Whichard and Mr. John Kent Cooke, Jr.

Pitt County Bookmobile

Source: Daily Reflector Image Collection (East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741.10.e.14)

Staff person: Matt Reynolds

Description:
This is an image of Pitt County’s second bookmobile from the spring of 1956.  Essentially operating as mobile libraries, bookmobiles were used to deliver books and other materials to areas that did not have traditional library buildings.  These programs were especially effective in granting access to rural and housebound people. This particular bookmobile was manufactured by the Gerstenslager Company.

Image of the Pitt County Bookmobile

City of Greenville, North Carolina

Source: Junius D. Grimes Papers (#571)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Take a step back in time to 1914 Greenville, N. C., in this C. E. Weaver Series, “Illustrated Cities”, by Central Publishing Co., Inc., in Richmond, Virginia. Greenville was growing and changing: The Center Brick Warehouse was selling Bright Leaf Tobacco (93,762 pounds avg. at $24.55 per hundred). The Flanagan Buggy Co. distributed products throughout Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Greenville Ice and Coal Co. was a necessity for this community. The R.L. Smith Stables sold and exchanged horses and mules. The East Carolina Teachers Training School is now called East Carolina University; the campus consisted of the Power House, Dining Hall, Infirmary, Dormitories and the Administration Building and the soon to be erected library, gymnasium and the President’s Residence. These are just a few highlights from the pamphlet from the Junius D. Grimes Papers #571.

“Cat’s Eye” Marble Reflector Railroad Crossing Sign

Source:  The Daily Reflector Image Collection,

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  The “cat’s eye” marble reflector was invented in 1933 by Percy Shaw of Boothtown, Halifax, West Yorkshire, UK.  Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_eye_(road)

Remembering The Flood of the Century

Source: University Archives

The Flood of the Century; Hurricane Dennis and Floyd Damage

The Flood of the Century; Hurricane Dennis and Floyd Damage; Reproduced by Permission. Photo by Glynis W. Litwin.

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

Autumn on campus is a time of happy reunions among those returning, and soon many are engaged in the various academic and social activities of the term. It seems only a few weeks before we are welcoming returning graduates for Homecoming. While many of the memories are happy ones, there are somber occasions to remember as well.

It has been ten years since the inundations of Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd caused “The Flood of the Century” in eastern North Carolina. Campus was closed at 2 PM on September 15, 1999, by order of Governor Hunt, and did not reopen until September 29. While Special Collections has many records of that time from the media, the holding of the University Archives are not especially strong on this topic. Slowly, more items are coming to the Archives. The image below is one of several dozen donated by Glynis Wells Litwin, who had just transferred to ECU that semester.

Taken from 5th Street, the image shows Jenkins Art Building behind one of the oaks that fell as a result of the storm. More images, information about the immediate effect of the Flood of the Century, and some of the resulting research will be on display in Joyner Library Special Collections and in the showcase on the 3rd Floor of Mendenhall Student Center through the week of Homecoming.

The C. Heber Forbes Store

Source: East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

C. Heber Forbes

C. Heber Forbes

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

This image dated March 30, 1960, is of the window displays from the C. Heber Forbes Store which was known for its high quality up-to-date ladies fashions. The store was originally located on Evans Street for many years. The owner, C. Heber Forbes, lived on Cotanche Street. His beautiful home and its breath-taking landscape was demolished for the location of what is now McDonald’s facing Tenth Street.

Source: Digital Collections, Joyner Library, ECU: http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/4575

Tabitha Marie DeVisconti

Source: Guide to the Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers, 1705-1983, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #480

Tabitha DeVisconti and her sister Sue May DeVisconti

Tabitha DeVisconti and her sister Sue May DeVisconti

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

This photograph depicts Tabitha Marie DeVisconti and her sister, Sue May DeVisconti. Tabitha Marie DeVisconti (1891-1983), a descendent of Revolutionary War hero Major Benjamin May, was a leading citizen of Farmville, N.C., for many years. She was the daughter of Adeline Gertrude May of Pitt County, N.C., and John Augustus Lorenzo DeVisconti, an Italian count who had property in Texas and Mexico. The DeViscontis married in 1890 in Texas, where their daughter Tabitha was born, and after living there briefly, moved to Farmville in 1891. The parents separated shortly before the birth of their second daughter, Sue May, in 1893. In 1901, Adeline remarried her first husband, Francis Dupree. Later that year, she entered the state hospital and subsequently died. Tabitha and Sue May were then raised by their aunt, Sue May Albritton.

Tabitha attended a women’s college in Richmond, Va. (1913-1914) and then returned to Farmville to begin a very active civic life. She was president of the many clubs and organizations of which she was a member. She was active in the building of the Major Benjamin May chapter House of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Farmville. Miss DeVisconti established a servicemen’s center in Farmville and supported the U.S. Naval Hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. She served as librarian for the Farmville public library and was involved with the building of a new library in early 1940s. Her home was on Main and Pine Sts. In Farmville which is now the May Museum.

To read more about her activities, her family, the forest fire on her land, etc., go to Manuscript Collection #480.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Use of Closed Circuit TV Marks the Beginning of ECU's Technological Progress

Source: University Archives

East Carolinian front page, 1958

East Carolinian front page, 1958

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

In 2008, East Carolina University celebrates the Golden Anniversary of homecoming with our Golden Class: the graduates of 1958. That year, East Carolina College, as the institution was then known, celebrated 50 years of higher education in Eastern North Carolina with an enthusiasm as great as we have seen for the centennial of East Carolina Unversity. Reviewing documents of the era for an exhibit to honor visiting alumni, I found the image below amusing and enlightening:

A 21-inch television seems almost quaint, as an educational experiment, in light of the more than 300 Smart Classrooms, complete with computer controlled projectors and web access, available today. There is also a reference to Joyner Library as the site of the studios. Even with progress, some things are constant. Today Joyner Library still contains studios, but now the focus is on videoconferencing [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/systems/JL_Videoconferencing.cfm, accessed November 5, 2008.]

ECU has the largest distance education prograrm in North Carolina [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/DEOrientation/upload/StudentSept07.htm, accessed November 5, 2008.] With this anonymous news item and photo, it becomes clear that many of our current achievements are the result of decades of effort pursuing all avenues to provide effective education for all students enrolled in East Carolina University.