Hurricane Donna Damage

Source:  Daily Reflector Negative Collection #741
Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  According to NOAA, Hurricane Donna is the only hurricane on record to produce hurricane-force winds along the entire Atlantic Coast of the U.S.  The 1960 hurricane reached Eastern North Carolina on September 11th when it made landfall at Topsail Island.  Although the Outer Banks took the brunt of the storm, damage was experienced as far inland as Goldsboro and Greenville.  The photograph below was taken either September 12th or 13th in the W. 10th Street area in Greenville.

 

“Cat’s Eye” Marble Reflector Railroad Crossing Sign

Source:  The Daily Reflector Image Collection,

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  The “cat’s eye” marble reflector was invented in 1933 by Percy Shaw of Boothtown, Halifax, West Yorkshire, UK.  Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_eye_(road)

Remembering The Flood of the Century

Source: University Archives

The Flood of the Century; Hurricane Dennis and Floyd Damage

The Flood of the Century; Hurricane Dennis and Floyd Damage; Reproduced by Permission. Photo by Glynis W. Litwin.

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

Autumn on campus is a time of happy reunions among those returning, and soon many are engaged in the various academic and social activities of the term. It seems only a few weeks before we are welcoming returning graduates for Homecoming. While many of the memories are happy ones, there are somber occasions to remember as well.

It has been ten years since the inundations of Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd caused “The Flood of the Century” in eastern North Carolina. Campus was closed at 2 PM on September 15, 1999, by order of Governor Hunt, and did not reopen until September 29. While Special Collections has many records of that time from the media, the holding of the University Archives are not especially strong on this topic. Slowly, more items are coming to the Archives. The image below is one of several dozen donated by Glynis Wells Litwin, who had just transferred to ECU that semester.

Taken from 5th Street, the image shows Jenkins Art Building behind one of the oaks that fell as a result of the storm. More images, information about the immediate effect of the Flood of the Century, and some of the resulting research will be on display in Joyner Library Special Collections and in the showcase on the 3rd Floor of Mendenhall Student Center through the week of Homecoming.

The C. Heber Forbes Store

Source: East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #741

C. Heber Forbes

C. Heber Forbes

Staff Person: Coleen Allen

Description:

This image dated March 30, 1960, is of the window displays from the C. Heber Forbes Store which was known for its high quality up-to-date ladies fashions. The store was originally located on Evans Street for many years. The owner, C. Heber Forbes, lived on Cotanche Street. His beautiful home and its breath-taking landscape was demolished for the location of what is now McDonald’s facing Tenth Street.

Source: Digital Collections, Joyner Library, ECU: http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/4575

The Little Mint

Source: The Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741

The Little Mint advertisement

The Little Mint advertisement

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

This image from the Daily Reflector Negative Collection is of a drive-in restaurant called “The Little Mint” which was opened by Wilbur Hardee, who is known as the founder of Hardee’s Restaurant which originated in Greenville, N.C. The restaurant was built in 1964 and was on 10th Street in Greenville, a few blocks from where the first Hardee’s restaurant was located. It was the first among a chain of Little Mints which opened and operated throughout the 1960s. By 1994, the Little Mint chain was all but gone save for one Little Mint in Windsor, N.C.

Sources: Digital Collections Image Repository, http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/6757

Hardee, Wilber. Founder of Hardee’s: The Life and Times of Wilber Hardee. New York: Writers Club Press, copyright 2000.

UN Walkout

Source: University Archives

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

On Friday, April 7, 1967, eight delegates from North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University) and Florida A&M University, who were on campus attending the ninth annual Middle South Model United Nations, walked out of the General Assembly. The African American delegates stated that they had been discriminated against by both the Model UN and ECC students and administrators.

Although the official conclusion was that the delegates from North Carolina College and Florida A&M University came to the assembly in search of publicity and attention, it was the first time since the integration of ECC that college officials were forced to publicly address discrimination on campus.

Sources:

“Take Up the Revolution.” East Carolinian, April 11, 1967.

Steve A. Baldwin. Letter to the Editor. East Carolinian, April 18, 1967.

Take Up the Revolution

Take Up the Revolution

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

Letter to the Editor; S. Baldwin

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

Source: Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #480

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C. This post card depicts the National Bank Building, which was constructed between 1911 and 1916 by the firm of Higgs, Hardee, and Laughinghouse at Five Points in Greenville. Five Points was the intersection of Fifth Street, Evans Street, and Dickinson Avenue. In addition to the bank, the triangular-shaped structure in 1916 housed offices, a barber, and a dry goods business. In later years, the bank was known as the State Bank. The structure was demolished in the 1970s by the Redevelopment Commission and the street pattern was radically altered as part of Greenville’s ambitious urban renewal program. The post card can be found in the Tabitha Marie DeVisconti Papers http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0480/ in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection. Records concerning the management of the National Bank Building in the 1910s and 1920s are available in the Charles O’Hagan Laughinghouse Papers. http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0270/

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

National Bank Building, Greenville, N.C.

Use of Closed Circuit TV Marks the Beginning of ECU's Technological Progress

Source: University Archives

East Carolinian front page, 1958

East Carolinian front page, 1958

Staff Person: L. K. Gypsye Legge

Description:

In 2008, East Carolina University celebrates the Golden Anniversary of homecoming with our Golden Class: the graduates of 1958. That year, East Carolina College, as the institution was then known, celebrated 50 years of higher education in Eastern North Carolina with an enthusiasm as great as we have seen for the centennial of East Carolina Unversity. Reviewing documents of the era for an exhibit to honor visiting alumni, I found the image below amusing and enlightening:

A 21-inch television seems almost quaint, as an educational experiment, in light of the more than 300 Smart Classrooms, complete with computer controlled projectors and web access, available today. There is also a reference to Joyner Library as the site of the studios. Even with progress, some things are constant. Today Joyner Library still contains studios, but now the focus is on videoconferencing [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/systems/JL_Videoconferencing.cfm, accessed November 5, 2008.]

ECU has the largest distance education prograrm in North Carolina [http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/DEOrientation/upload/StudentSept07.htm, accessed November 5, 2008.] With this anonymous news item and photo, it becomes clear that many of our current achievements are the result of decades of effort pursuing all avenues to provide effective education for all students enrolled in East Carolina University.

ECU's Historic Relationship with the Railroad

Source: University Archives

Our Own College Railroad

Our Own College Railroad

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

The first years of East Carolina University’s history are in many ways tied to the railroad. The Atlantic Coastline Railroad was built through Greenville in 1889 and the Norfolk Southern intersected Greenville and the Atlantic Coastline in 1907, making Greenville accessible to the rest of the state and a possible location for a normal school. The first students at East Carolina Teachers Training School came to Greenville by train, and then took the school jitney from the train station to the campus. Students continued to come primarily by train through the 1940s.

The back of the luggage tag was used to label the ceremonial shovel supposedly used in the college’s groundbreaking. The first men’s dormitory referred to on the tag would have been Jarvis Hall. Two other men’s dormitories were established in 1947, when the number of men enrolled surpassed women for the first time.

In the late 1920s a supply track was built from the Norfolk Southern tracks to haul coal to the campus power plant.

Luggage Tag

Luggage Tag

John F. Kennedy Campaign Poster, circa 1960

Source: Joseph F. and Lala Carr Steelman Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #924

JFK campaign poster

JFK campaign poster

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today’s staff pick is a John F. Kennedy campaign poster (circa 1960) from the Joseph F. and Lala Carr Steelman Papers (#924). The Steelmans, who taught in ECU’s Department of History for many years, were active politically. The poster is believed to have been one used at Kennedy’s appearance at ECU (then East Carolina College) on September 17, 1960, during his campaign for President. This appearance marked the first time a presidential candidate had visted the city of Greenville. A photo of the event from East Carolina University’s Archives is also featured with the poster.

Kennedy Visits Greenville

Kennedy Visits Greenville