Fannie Wallace Letter to Mannie & Sissie Tuten 29 July 1863

Source: Arthur Whitford Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #18.1.a
Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo
Description: Letter from Fannie Wallace to Mannie and Sissie Tuten, 29 July 1863

Fannie Wallace Civil War Letter 29 July 1863

This little letter is from a young woman in Greensboro, North Carolina to her grandparents, Mannie and Sissie Tuten. It offers a glimpse into social life in the South during the crisis of the Civil War. Written less than a month after the Battle of Gettysburg (1-3 July) and the Fall of Vicksburg (4 July 1863) that ended any hope of Confederate victory, Fannie makes no mention of these disasters. Instead, she focuses on her family and social activities, her friends and her parties. She writes that her cousins are visiting and wishes they could be with them too. She passes on Nancie’s request for some snuff. Fannie knows there is a war on and that there are shortages. Indeed, she proclaims her patriotism: she is writing with Confederate ink on a Confederate spelling book and danced with two Confederate officers at a Ball. Either she did not understand the seriousness of the military situation, or, perhaps, more likely, did not wish to think about them or burden her grandparents with her worries.

Great American Cock, Male (Wild Turkey)

Source:  Rare QL674.A9 2006

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:

Study for the Great American Cock, Male one of the major plates in the large elephant folio edition of Birds of America by John James Audubon (1785-1851), artist, and William Home Lizars (1788-1859), engraving done around 1826, in Lousiana. Watercolor on paper, 37 ­x 25 1/2 inches. This print is from the New-York Historical Society edition of Audubon’s fifty best watercolors from the original watercolors preparatory for John James Audubon’s Birds of America, Chicago, Oppenheimer editions, ca. 2006.

Sadie Hawkins Day Race

Source:  University Archives Visual Materials Collection

Staff Person:  Arthur Carlson

Description: This photo from the University Archives shows East Carolina students participating in a 1953 Sadie Hawkins Day Race (UA55-01-4841). By tradition, on Sadie Hawkins Day girls ask boys to accompany them to a dance or on a date. The event originated in 1937 with the comic strip Li’l Abner when the town spinster, Sadie Hawkins, is sent in pursuit of the town’s eligible bachelors as they raced to avoid marriage to the “homeliest gal in the hills.”  The gender-based role reversal proved popular among female college students as Sadie Hawkins Day events rose in popularity across the nation. By 1952, Sadie Hawkins Day events were held in over 40,000 locations.  In this image, Fleming and Wilson Dormitories are on the right and the Old Cafeteria Complex is just visible on the left. The large building in the center rear is the original Austin classroom building.

UA55-01-4841

President Carter: FREE THE WILMINGTON 10

 

Wilmington 10 Demonstration Poster

President Carter: FREE THE WILMINGTON 10

Source:
North Carolina Collection  NoCar F265.N4 P74 1977

Staff Person:
Susan Holland

Description:
In October 1972, Ben Chavis along with nine other defendants were sentenced in the February 1971 firebombing of Mike’s Grocery in Wilmington, NC. The arson stemmed from long-standing frustration among African Americans due to the slow movement of school desegregation and other social reforms in the state. Known as the Wilmington 10, the group was perceived as political prisoners and were the subject of documentaries and news articles. Human rights groups including Amnesty International and the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression took up the cause to release the prisoners. In 1977, in response to President Carter administration’s accusations of Soviet Union human rights violations, the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression called for rallies in cities across the United States to free the Wilmington 10. In January 1978, North Carolina’s Governor Jim Hunt refused to pardon the prisoners, though he commuted their sentences. In 1980, a federal appeals court overturned the Wilmington 10’s conviction, and they were released. In May 2012, forty years after their conviction, the Wilmington 10 asked Governor Beverly Purdue for pardons.

Chinese Language Chart

Source: Lucy J. Webb Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #363

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Miss Lucy J. Webb, arrived in Shanghai, China, in August of 1922. She worked as a Methodist missionary from 1922 to 1943 and from 1946 to 1951. Her memoir describes the labor done by the many missionaries in Shanghai during those years, with special attention to the work of Moore Memorial Church. This chart shows the difficulties of correct usage of tones in the Chinese language and how tone changes the meaning of words.

William Clyde Friday 1920 – 2012

Source: Joyner Library Digital Collections Identifer: 55-01-1676

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: 

William Clyde “Bill” Friday (July 13, 1920 – October 12, 2012) served as the head of the University of North Carolina system from 1956 to 1986. He was born in Raphine, Va.,  and raised in Dallas, N.C. After retirement, Friday remained an influential voice in North Carolina and hosted a public television talk show, North Carolina People, which he began while still president of the University system. Friday is shown here with ECU President Leo Jenkins in this undated photograph. No doubt Jenkins was explaining some of the finer points of the Pirate Life to Mr.Friday. Mr. Friday died on Friday, October 12, 2012.

Father Maurice Tew and Children, 1961

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741.26.a.7

Staff Person: Maury York

Description: Father Maurice Tew came to Greenville from West Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1935 to assist the priest at St. Peter’s Catholic Church. Charged with the responsibility of ministering to African Americans in the city, Father Maurice spearheaded the construction of a mission church on West Fifth Street. Named in honor of St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother, the church was dedicated on March 1, 1936. In 1956 the church built a school for African American children. The nuns who taught the eight grades lived in a convent across the street. Of the 170 students who enrolled in the school initially, most were not members of the Catholic Church. A man with good sense of humor, Father Maurice endeared himself to many, as this photograph would indicate. He employed both radio and television broadcasts as a means of outreach to the broader community. (Source: Greenville Times, June 26-July 9, 1991).

Father Maurice with Children

Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola

Source: Minges Collection #1136.1.a

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description: Original, signed letter from Caleb (C. D.) Bradham, Sr., inventor of Pepsi-Cola, to Dr. Jos. J. Watson in South Carolina promoting Pepsi-Cola as a safe drink.  Bradham also mentions some basic ingredients found in the beverage (1917).

Caricature Made for U.S. Sailors Stationed in Pre-WWII China

Source:  William E. and Marion B. Stewart Papers (Manuscript Collection #707)

Staff Person:  Martha Elmore

Description:  U.S. Navy officer William E. Stewart and his wife Marion visited China and the Philippines in the late 1930s.  While there they took many photographs and bought other photographs which they collected into two albums–one for each country.  This image is a photograph of a caricature made for U.S. sailors stationed in China.  The photograph was taken by Hwa Sheng of Chefoo.  

                                                                                                                                                                              

Pitt County Bookmobile

Source: Daily Reflector Image Collection (East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741.10.e.14)

Staff person: Matt Reynolds

Description:
This is an image of Pitt County’s second bookmobile from the spring of 1956.  Essentially operating as mobile libraries, bookmobiles were used to deliver books and other materials to areas that did not have traditional library buildings.  These programs were especially effective in granting access to rural and housebound people. This particular bookmobile was manufactured by the Gerstenslager Company.

Image of the Pitt County Bookmobile