Woman’s Portrait, Civil War

Source: Moore Family Papers (ECU Manuscript Collection #275)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Guilford Andrews carried this woman’s portrait, during the Civil War. He was a member of Company E. 43rd Regiment, known as “The Edgecombe Boys”.  He enlisted at the age of 22, on January 28th 1862.  He was mustered in at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh. He was wounded in the elbow at or near Bethesda Church, Virginia, on May 30th 1864. http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/totopotomoy-creek/maps/totopotomoy-creek-may.html He returned to duty on September-October, 1864, and was promoted to Corporal, on November 1st 1864. He was then captured near Petersburg, Virginia on March 25th 1865. He was a prisoner at Point Lookout, Maryland, and he was released on June 22nd 1865, after taking the Oath of Allegiance. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_Lookout,_Maryland

The daguerreotype#  P-275/112, was produced on a silver coated, copper 1/9-plate, and the cover  to the case is missing. The date of the image is September 26th 1863 at Orange Court House. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_county_courthouses_in_North_Carolina

WWI Era Letter

Source: James G. Raby Papers, Manuscript Collection #317

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The James G. Raby Papers consists of handwritten letters from James G. Raby; a physician from Leggett, North Carolina who served as a 2nd Lieutenant during World War I. This particular letter dated October 8, 1918 is one written by him to his sweetheart and it contains a description of the influenza epidemic that occurred in Rocky Mount and Tarboro (1918-1919).

 

Anniversary Program

CollectionJesse Rountree Moye Papers, MC #1111

Staff Member: Nanette Hardison

The image below is of a program for an event held on May 27, 1932 in Farmville, North Carolina. This event celebrated the 60th anniversary of the founding of Farmville,  the bicentennial of the  birth of George Washington, the marking of the Old Plank Road and the memory of Alfred Moye. Shown below is the program for the event which included a number of local speakers.

 

Thomas Smith Deed for 240 Acres, Bladen County, NC, 25 Sept. 1799

Thomas Smith Deed for 240 Acres of Land p. 1Thomas Smith Deed for 240 Acres of Land

Source:  Ralph C. Deal Collection (ECU Manuscript Collections #0027)

Staff Person:  Jonathan Dembo

Description:

This deed, survey and plat seen above, dated 25 September 1799, granting 240 acres of land in Bladen County, North Carolina to Thomas Smith, was signed by North Carolina Governor Richard Dobbs Spaight, who also signed the U. S. Constitution. Spaight (1758 – 1802) was North Carolina’s 8th governor after American independence. The first native-born American to be elected Governor, he served three one-year terms, 1792 – 1795.  Born in New Bern to the son of a colonial official, Spaight was educated in Ireland and Scotland.  He returned to America to serve as an aide to American General Richard Caswell, during the Revolutionary War, 1778 – 1781.

After the Revolution, Spaight served as a representative from North Carolina in the Continental Congress, 1782 – 1785, and in the North Carolina House of Commons, 1785 – 1788, where he became Speaker of the House.  In 1787 he became a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.  He was only 29 when he signed the document.

During his term as Governor, Raleigh was chosen as the site for the new State Capitol and Chapel Hill was chosen as the site for the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. As governor, Spaight was also the chair of the first UNC Board of Trustees.  Spaight died in 1802 as the result of an wound sustained in a duel at New Bern with his bitter political rival, Federalist John Stanly.  Spaight’s son, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Jr. (1796 – 1850) served as both congressman, 1823 – 1825, and governor, 1835 – 1836;  his grandson, Richard Spaight Donnell (1820 – 1867) served as a congressman from North Carolina, 1847 – 1849.

St. James Episcopal Church, Kittrell, NC

Source: Augustus Moore Family Papers (ECU Manuscript Collections #1216)

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

St. James Episcopal Church was built in a Gothic-Style, the church is located in Kittrell, NC.

A Confederate Hospital was located in Kittrell during the  Civil War and the church saw  to the patients needs and provided Christian burials for the 52 soldiers who died there. PC-1216.13.a.1

Scouting for Food

Source: Boy Scouts of America, East Carolina Council Records, MC #1199

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

This photo (1990) is from the Boy Scouts of America, East Carolina Council Records; a collection of documents that illustrates the history of the eastern N.C. branch of the Boy Scouts of America.  This picture was taken at a Boy Scout charity event called Scouting for Food; a food drive that the Boy Scouts conduct on a regular basis to collect food donations for the hungry. The picture shows a boy scout with two cub scouts preparing for the Scouting for Food Campaign.

Military Training in North Carolina Public Schools 1853

Source:  L. H. Smith Papers (#23.1.a.1)

Staff Person:  Jonathan Dembo

Description:  Below is a personal letter from future Edgecombe and Duplin County school teacher, L. H. Smith, to his brother Edward P. Smith.  At the time he wrote this letter, L. H. was teaching at Bradly’s School House, but had not yet earned his teaching certificate.  Edward begins the letter by recounting his search for two of Edward’s mislaid letters and his eventual discovery of  a silver shilling leading him to the comic deduction that Edward’s letter must have contained silver ore.  He promises that if Edward sends him a gold shilling, he will be more careful of it.  However the bulk of the letter describes his experiences teaching at Bradley’s School House, North Carolina.  He focuses on the regular Friday routine.  All his scholars, he writes, “speak”, or recite their lessons, on Friday and he musters all the boys accompanied by a fife and drum.  “The smaller boys”, he writes, “have wooden guns and the larger real ones.”  Apparently, this was something of a social occasion in the community and a matter of serious competition between different schools and schoolmasters.  L. H. reports that “Frank was here last week and see [sic] me drill them.  He says they beat his company.  Some Fridays there is some 25 or thirty people to hear them speak and to see them muster and lots of girls among them.”  L. H. notes that he is writing during recess and has no time to “collect my thoughts” but readers will note numerous errors of spelling and punctuation in the letter.  One hopes that the students benefited more from L. H.’s lessons in reading and arithmetic than they could have from his writing lessons.

Military Training in North Carolina Public Schools 1853

1706 Van der Aa Map of North Carolina

 

Source: Zee en Land togten der Franszen Geaan na,en in’t Americaans Gewest van Florida (MC 49)

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description: This 1706 map of the Carolinas and Florida drawn by Pieter van der Aa (1659-1733)  is based on an earlier 1606 map by Hondius (see MC 42). The map features a North Carolina Native American town called Chicola on the River Jordaan. Also shown are the locations of the ill fated French settlements of 1562 (Ribaut) and 1564 (Laudonierre). The lower right cartouche features a really neat early European drawing of the Carolina Palmetto (Sabal Palmetto). The title of the map Zee en Land togten der Franszen na,en in’t Americaans Gewest van Florida, aller-eerst dour Joh. Pontius ontdekt,  translates as the land of France in America along with the discoveries of Ponce de Leon.

Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949.

Source: Leo Jenkins Papers, Manuscript # 360

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949. Jenkins served as a Major in World War II where he saw action at Guadalcanal, Guam and Iwo Jima. For his military service, Jenkins received the Bronze Star and two Presidential Citations. In 1947 Jenkins joined the faculty of East Carolina Teachers College, where he served as Dean until being elected as President of the college in 1960. He eventually was named Chancellor, and retired in 1978. date: 1949; creator: U.S. Marine Corps

Safe Conduct

Source: Robin Brabham Collection, E.C. Manuscript Collection #1175

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:
This statement dated December 1, 1862 was written by Union officer Major Charles E.  Mears to Thomas Midgett of Croatan, N.C.  to give him and his family safe conduct while traveling around the area. The statement also gave him permission to keep his property. 

Safe Conduct Statement

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