Letter Documenting Use of Labor from Tarboro, N.C., WWII Prisoner of War Camp

Source: E. C. Winslow Records (Manuscript Collection #1174)

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description: About 3000 Italian prisoners of war were sent to Camp Butner, just outside of Durham, N.C., in September 1943 where they were engaged in work projects.  Out of this group about 500 men each were sent to branch camps in Tarboro, Windsor, and Scotland Neck to pick peanuts for the local farmers.  By the end of July 1944 these prisoners were relocated to camps outside of North Carolina due to difficulties in handling the men.   The source for this information is NCpedia.

Edward Cyrus Winslow (born 1886) of Tarboro, Edgecombe Co. N.C., was involved in many business enterprises including the horse and mule business, farm operations, land transactions, and a saw mill operation.  This letter dated October 13, 1943, documents that Mr. Winslow did hire Italian WWII prisoners of war to pick peanuts for him.  In this signed letter, E. C. Winslow attests that 2647 stacks of peanuts were completed by prisoner of war labor during the period of September 29 through October 9, 1943, and that at $.10 a stack he owes the government $264.70 for the labor.

Broadside (circa 1883) offering farmland and timberland near New Berne, N.C.

Source: Edward B. Ellis, Jr. Papers #753.4

Staff Person: Dale Sauter


Description: Original broadside (circa 1883) offering a “Rare Chance for Capitalists!”  Offered for rent or lease by Mrs. Virginia Harrison of New Berne, N.C. is Camp Palmer, “one of the finest farms in Eastern North Carolina.”  She also states she has “a good cotton farm” and “fine timber lands” available as well.

"The Eclipse" Steam Engine

Source:  Hunter-Wills Family Papers (#237) East Carolina Manuscript Collection

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:

Described as “The ‘Eclipse’ on Wheels, this portable steam engine was produced by Frick & Co. of Waynesboro, PA.  It is described as “especially adapted for threshing grain, sawing wood and lumber, ginning cotton, and whenever it is necessary to move from place to place.”  The image comes from a circa 1878 Frick & Co. catalog.  The entire catalog can be found at the following link:

http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/13844

This catalog, and other similar catalogs, can be found in the Hunter-Wills Family Papers, collection number 237.

Aerial View of Barbour Boat Works, Inc.

Source:  Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  This image offers a nice view of the Barbour Boat Works factory in New Bern, North Carolina.  The business ended in the mid-1980s.  Included in the Barbour Boat Works, Inc. Records are important ship drawings, correspondence and photos.  We plan to add descriptions of all photos in this collection very soon.  Check the finding aid at the following link for future updates.  http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0758/

Dig We Must ! – Into the Coal Operators' Profits!

Cover of Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Cover of Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Source: Dig We Must! – Into the Coal Operators’ Profits!, Hoover HD8039.M615 D5 1970

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

With the approach of May Day, the Special Collections Department features the cover of a pamphlet published in 1970 by the Coal Commission of Communist Party, U.S.A. The pamphlet is part of the Hoover Collection on International Communism, the nucleus of which was donated to Joyner Library by Dr. J. C. Peele of Kinston, N.C. The tract mentions gains made by miners through the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, but stresses additional goals:

“We Communists advocate public ownership of the coal industry, operated by a federal body on which the United Mine Workers, working miners, and other residents of the coal-producing regions are strongly represented. This body could guarantee that the needs of the nation come first, not the profits of the wealthy. It could insure the highest safety standards for all mines, provide job security, guarantee decent retirement pay, and use the tremendous profits now going to a few rich investors for decent schools, public housing, hospitals and other pressing needs of people in the coal fields.

This body could put an end to the criminal destruction of our natural resources by the indiscriminate use of strip and auger mining, and create beautiful recreation areas for people from all parts of the country.”

Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

To view an enlarged version, click on the image.

The Workers Vanguard

Source: Workers Vanguard, uncataloged periodical, Hoover Collection

Workers vanguard front page

Workers vanguard front page

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:
The Workers Vanguard is the official publication of the International Communist League (Fourth International). The International Communist League (sometimes known in the United States as the Spartacist League), describes itself as “a proletarian, revolutionary and international tendency committed to the task of building Leninist parties and national sections of a democratic centralist international.” In January of 1919 V.I. Lenin called upon the left wing of the Socialist Party of America to join the Communist International (Comintern). This left wing attempted to gain control of the Socialist Party, but party leaders were tipped off and arranged for the Chicago Police to throw out the left wing members at the meeting. This left wing became the current Communist Party USA. In 1937 a “Revolutionary Tendency” was again formed in the American Socialist Workers Party (SWP). This Lenin/Trotsky “Tendency” was expelled from the SWP in 1963 and in 1966 formed the Spartacist League/U.S. The Workers Vanguard is the main party organ. This issue features an article on immigration reform showing pickets at the Smithfield Food plant in Tar Heel, NC.

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!

Source: May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!, Hoover Pamphlet HX86.M34 1938

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:
This pamphlet, published by the Workers Library Publishers (New York) in 1938, is from the rich holdings of the Hoover Collection on International Communism. Decrying the efforts of “hard-faced reactionaries of fabulous wealth” to undermine the desires of the common people of America, the author tells what working people want: “We want democracy. We want jobs. We want security. We want peace.”

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!