Postcards of President & Mrs. William H. Taft in Inauguration Parade & Departure of ex-President Theodore Roosevelt, March 4, 1909

Source: William E. Elmore Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, #39

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description:

These postcard images depict the departure of President Theodore Roosevelt’s carriage from the White House and the newly sworn in President William H. Taft and his wife Helen Herron Taft riding in a carriage in Taft’s inauguration parade from the Capitol to the White House. The inauguration took place on March 4, 1909, and these images were taken by the Harris & Ewing Photography Studio in Washington, D.C. The studio was founded by George W. Harris and Martha Ewing in 1905. Martha Ewing sold her interest to Harris in 1915 and he continued the news service until 1945; it was considered the busiest studio in the country when he sold it.

Postcard photograph of ex-President Roosevelt leaving Capitol, March 4th 1909, Washington D.C.

Postcard photograph of ex-President Roosevelt leaving Capitol, March 4th 1909, Washington D.C.

The postcard depicting the Tafts contains the following caption: “An Unprecedented Event. Mrs. Wm. H. Taft Accompaning [sic] President Taft Inaugural Parade.” According to the U.S. Senate Rules Committee website, this was the first time that a First Lady accompanied her husband on the ride from the Capitol to the White House after the inauguration.

Postcard photograph of Pres. William H. Taft and his wife

Postcard photograph of Pres. William H. Taft and his wife

These postcards (numbered as follows: 39.4.b.183 and 39.4.b.182) were part of a collection belonging to Lucy Warren Myers (1900-1984) of Greensboro, N.C., when she was a child. She married James Skinner Ficklen, Sr., in 1922 and they lived in Greenville, N.C., raising two sons.

For more information concerning the collection containing these postcards, go to the finding aid for the William E. Elmore Collection #39 found at http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0039/. For more information on the Harris & Ewing studio go to http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/stories/2000/11/13/focus8.html.

Joseph Hewes, Signer of the Declaration of Independence

Source: Brownrigg Family Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #597

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

Document signed by Joseph Hewes

Document signed by Joseph Hewes

The image is of a legal document sworn to by Joseph Hewes in May 1761. He witnessed a dispute between Captain Edward Bryan and Captain Adam McKean concerning wages McKean claimed to have earned during a voyage to Philadelphia. This statement was given to Joseph Blount, a justice of the peace in Edenton, Chowan County, North Carolina. Joseph Hewes was born in New Jersey on January 23, 1730. He moved to Edenton in 1755, where he entered into business with George Blair and Charles Worth Blount. Five years later he was elected to serve in the Assembly of North Carolina, representing the borough of Edenton. Hewes later served in the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of Independence. He died in Philadelphia on November 10, 1779, while serving in the Continental Congress.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Jesse Helms

Source: David B. Stevens Papers, 1943-1946, 1973-1988, undated; East Carolina Manuscript Collection #779

Jesse Helms Photograph

Jesse Helms Photograph

Staff Person: Nanette Hardison

Description:

Jesse Helms (1921-2008) was a five-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina and a member of the Republican Party. He is well known for the great influence he had over both state and national politics during his Senatorial terms from 1973 to 2002. The undated photo shown below is of then-Senator Helms (standing third from right) with his staff and David B. Stevens (seated fourth from left), who was a professor of business and criminal law at East Carolina University. Professor Stevens’s wife Willa Stevens is also in the picture and she is seated to the left of Stevens. The photograph is of particular interest because it includes a short message by Jesse Helms to Professor Stevens along with his autograph at the bottom of the photo.

This picture is in the David B. Stevens Papers along with correspondence that documents Stevens’s discussions with Helms and other political figures about state and national legislation. The staff at the Special Collections Department will be happy to assist anyone who wishes to examine these documents and other material from this collection.

Sources:

David B. Stevens Papers, 1943-1946, 1973-1988, undated, #779 Collection Finding Aid – http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/special/ead/findingaids/0779/

Jesse Helms (Wikipedia entry) – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Helms

Dig We Must ! – Into the Coal Operators' Profits!

Cover of Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Cover of Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Source: Dig We Must! – Into the Coal Operators’ Profits!, Hoover HD8039.M615 D5 1970

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

With the approach of May Day, the Special Collections Department features the cover of a pamphlet published in 1970 by the Coal Commission of Communist Party, U.S.A. The pamphlet is part of the Hoover Collection on International Communism, the nucleus of which was donated to Joyner Library by Dr. J. C. Peele of Kinston, N.C. The tract mentions gains made by miners through the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, but stresses additional goals:

“We Communists advocate public ownership of the coal industry, operated by a federal body on which the United Mine Workers, working miners, and other residents of the coal-producing regions are strongly represented. This body could guarantee that the needs of the nation come first, not the profits of the wealthy. It could insure the highest safety standards for all mines, provide job security, guarantee decent retirement pay, and use the tremendous profits now going to a few rich investors for decent schools, public housing, hospitals and other pressing needs of people in the coal fields.

This body could put an end to the criminal destruction of our natural resources by the indiscriminate use of strip and auger mining, and create beautiful recreation areas for people from all parts of the country.”

Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

Dig we must! into the coal operators' profits!

To view an enlarged version, click on the image.

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick July 1, 1964

Source: Capus Miller Waynick Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #421

Staff Person: Dale Sauter

Description:

Today, April 4th, 2008, marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. In memory of King and his accomplishments, my pick today relates to Civil Rights history. Featured below is a telegram from President Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick. Johnson is asking Waynick to serve on the Community Relations Service, a committee created to help resolve racial disputes following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. At the time, Waynick was serving as Race Relations “Troubleshooter” for North Carolina Governor Terry Sanford.

I have to admit I was not familiar with this committee. However, according to the following quote from Resolving Racial Conflict by Bertram J. Levine, the first written history of the Community Relations Service, this committee is not remembered by most of the general public today for good reason. “In 1964, when the Civil Rights Act was passed, Congress wisely created an agency based in the U.S. Department of Justice to help forestall or resolve racial or ethnic disputes evolving from the act. Mandated by law and by its own methodology to shun publicity, Community Relations Service developed self-effacement to a fine art. Thus the accomplishments, as well as the shortcomings, of this federal venture into conflict resolution are barely known in official Washington, and even less so by the American public”. For more on Bertram’s book, including some “sneak-preview” pages, follow this link. http://books.google.com/books?id=iYMOU0enPNEC&dg=%22national+citizens+committee+for+community+relations%22&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0

For more information on the Waynick Papers or any other collections we hold, please contact us for further details.

To view an enlarged version of the images, click on the images.



Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Telegram from Lyndon B. Johnson to Capus M. Waynick

Clarence Leroy Shuping Letter

Source: Guide to the Clarence Leroy Shuping Papers, 1920-1975, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #553

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

Letter of Clarence Leroy Shuping concerning Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Campaign in North Carolina, May 14, 1932

Clarence Leroy Shuping (1886-1971), a native of Rowan County, North Carolina, practiced law in Greensboro for many years following his admission to the State Bar in 1912. An active member of the Democratic Party, Shuping served the organization on the state and national levels and managed Josiah Bailey’s successful campaign in 1930 for a seat in the United States Senate. In 1932 he served as state campaign manager for Franklin D. Roosevelt in his bid for the presidency. This letter from Shuping to the chairman of the Democratic State Committee in New York, where Roosevelt served as governor, outlines steps that had been taken in North Carolina to organize support for Roosevelt. Shuping mentions that North Carolinians “resent” the position of former New York Governor Alfred E. Smith, who unsuccessfully opposed Roosevelt for the Democratic nomination. The Clarence Leroy Shuping Papers complement other collections within the East Carolina Manuscript Collection that pertain to state and national politics. If researchers are interested in any other material from the Shuping Papers, then they should go to the collection’s finding aid which can be accessed at Clarence Leroy Shuping Papers, #553

To view an enlarged version of the image, click on the image itself.

Clarence Leroy Shuping letter

Clarence Leroy Shuping letter

Capus Waynick and Anastasio Somoza

Source: Guide to the Capus Miller Waynick Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #421

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

This photograph from the Capus Miller Waynick Papers in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection shows Waynick (right) with Anastasio Somoza, the military dictator who ruled Nicaragua from 1936 until he was assassinated in 1956. Waynick (1889-1986), a native of Rockingham County, N.C., edited the High Point Enterprise, served as a state legislator and played an active role in North Carolina’s Democratic Party. After Waynick sucessfully managed W. Kerr Scott’s upset bid for the governorship in 1948, President Harry Truman appointed him Ambassador to Nicaragua. This photograph was taken about 1949, shortly after Waynick arrived in the country. Waynick’s papers, Manuscript Collection 421, include significant materials pertaining to Somoza and Waynick’s service as ambassador. Recently a young scholar from the Netherlands spent three days in the Special Collections Department conducting research in the Waynick papers for his forthcoming book on Somoza. He noted that Waynick’s diary kept during his stay in Nicaragua is the only such document he has located among the papers of U.S. ambassadors to Nicaragua during Somoza’s dictatorship. Also available in the Manuscript Collection is Waynick’s oral history interview, conducted by Donald R. Lennon.

Click on the image to see an enlarged version.

Anastasio Somoza and Capus Waynick

Anastasio Somoza and Capus Waynick

Constitutional Education League

Source: Vote CIO and Get a Soviet America, Hoover E812 K36 1944

Vote CIO and get a Soviet America

Vote CIO and get a Soviet America

Staff Person: Ralph Scott

Description:
The Constitutional Education League was founded shortly after World War I to combat “Communism in the United States and world wide.” In a 1942 Washington Post article entitled “28 Organized Groups Linked to Fascist Plot,” it was noted that the League had been named as being an instrument of the Axis Powers.

The pamphlet shown here Vote CIO and Get a Soviet America, published during the 1944 U.S. presidential campaign, attempted to show the ties between the Roosevelt administration, American labor unions and various communists cells operating in the United States. The U.S. Congress attempted to discover through an investigation, the financial backers of the League. The Vice-President of the League, Joseph P. Kamp refused to reveal this information to Congress and in 1950 was convicted and served four months in prison. Again in 1952 the House Lobby Investigation Committee tried to get Kamp to produce financial records of the League, but he again refused. This time he was acquitted of any wrongdoing with regard to his failure to reveal the League’s financial backers.

Hoover Collection, purchase from Argosy Book Store, NYC, 1996, state funds. Hoover E812 K36 1944

Joseph McCarthy

Source:

Red-addled brain behind the Scripps-Howard smear of Joseph McCarthy.

Red-addled brain behind the Scripps-Howard smear of Joseph McCarthy.

The Red-Addled Brain Behind the Scripps-Howard Smear of Joseph McCarthy, Hoover Pamphlet, E748.M143 K36 1954

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

This pamphlet by Joseph P. Kamp denounces efforts by Frederick Woltman of Scripps-Howard newspapers to “destroy” anti-communist leader Joseph McCarthy. According to Kamp, “Red Fred” Woltman “stabbed Joe McCarthy in the back . . . in the pages of the Scripps-Howard newspapers . . . Just how much the cause of communism will be helped . . . by this foul betrayal will depend on how well the public comes to know and understand . . . the treachery of this modern Judas.”

This and many other pro- and anti-communist tracts are available in the Hoover Collection on International Communism. The call number for this pamphlet is E748.M143 K36 1954.

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!

Source: May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!, Hoover Pamphlet HX86.M34 1938

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:
This pamphlet, published by the Workers Library Publishers (New York) in 1938, is from the rich holdings of the Hoover Collection on International Communism. Decrying the efforts of “hard-faced reactionaries of fabulous wealth” to undermine the desires of the common people of America, the author tells what working people want: “We want democracy. We want jobs. We want security. We want peace.”

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!

May Day: 1938 for Democracy, Jobs, Security, Peace!