1912 Hat Sales Brochure

Source:  Benjamin B. Winborne Papers, collection number 691-005

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  Today’s staff pick features a Spring and Summer 1912 Hat Sales Brochure for clothing manufacturer, Dunlap & Co.  Inside the cover is printed the local sales agency, Sole Agency, Hampton Roads Hat Co., Norfolk, VA. Interestingly, this street scene features both a horse-driven carriage and a “horseless carriage.”

The entire catalog can be found at the following link:

http://specialcollections.ecu.edu/14829

Domestic Disturbances

Special Collections Reference U 230 .U6 1945
United States Army Field Manuals are currently published by the Army’s Publishing Directorate. Over 500 manuals are currently in use. They provided detailed directions for soldiers to use in the field on a variety of topics including tactics and repair of equipment. This particular manual, published in 1945 provided instructions to troops on how to control domestic disturbances. Topics covered included: authorization regulations for the use of military troops to control civil unrest, crowd control, mob tactics, “offensive actions against a city,” and restoration of civil order. The manual ends with tactical directions for the use of chemical agents to control civilian groups. The tactics and methods outlined in this manual were used by federal, state and local authorities in the 1960s and 1970s to control civil and student unrest in the United States.

R. E. Day's Letter to S. Day, 16 October 1831

First page of R. E. Day’s letter to his uncle in America. Westfall Collection #8.1.a.os.1.1

Above is the first page of a letter from R. E. Day of Handen, in the hops-growing region of Kent, near London to his uncle S. Day, who had emigrated and was living in Utica, New York. Day reports on the poor economic conditions in England’s farming regions and the outbreak of riots and disturbances in the area, including the recent burning of Lord Winchilsea’s farm. These riots, known as the “Swing Riots” because they were frequently preceded by warning letters from a “Captain Swing” had begun the previous summer but continued throughout the decade and spread to many other regions of England. It resulted in several major pieces of legislation including the first revision of the Poor Laws since the reign of Queen Elizabeth. Lord Winchilsea (George William Finch-Hatton) was a politically prominent and somewhat notorious landowner. Winchilsea had challenged the Duke of Wellington to a duel, in 1829, when the latter was still prime minister of England. Both men deliberately aimed wide.

Westfall Collection #8.1.a.os.1.1