Dred Peacock – W. T. Farrow Correspondence 23-25 May 1900

Dred Peacock, President, Greensboro Female College, Greensboro, NC. Letter to Capt. W. T. Farrow, Washington, NCCapt. W. T. Farrow, Washington, NC. Letter to Dred Peacock, President, Greensboro Female College, Greensboro, NC

Source:  J. A. Burgess Papers (#22.1.a)

Staff Person:  Jonathan Dembo

Description: The correspondence between Dred Peacock and W. T. Farrow, seen above, is from the J. A. Burgess Papers in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection. Peacock had been a professor of Latin, German, Physics and Chemistry since 1888, and, since 1894, had been President of Greensboro Female College. His wife, Ella Carr, was the daughter of O. W. Carr, a member of the Trinity College (now Duke University) faculty and a member of Greensboro Female College’s Board of Trustees. During his tenure as President, Peacocks had been struck by a terrible tragedy.  Their daughter, Ethel Carr Peacock, died at the age of 6. Subsequently, the Peacocks endowed the Greensboro Female College library in their daughter’s name.

W. T. Farrow was a Washington, NC justice of the peace, school board member, and a local agent for the Norfolk & Southern Railway Company.  He was also secretary-treasurer of the Styron Transportation Company, a subsidiary of the Norfolk & Southern, which operated the steamer AURORA in the Washington, NC vicinity.  He had sent his daughter, Mamie, to attend Greensboro Female Academy in the sprint of 1899, but Mamie had been forced to withdraw due to illness.

The correspondence is found in the J. A. Burgess Papers (#22) in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection. Burgess was the chief agent of the Norfolk & Southern Railroad Company in Washington, NC, where Farrow worked, but otherwise was unrelated to Farrow.

Greensboro Female College, chartered in 1838 by the Methodist Church, was the first chartered college for women in North Carolina and only the third college for women in the nation. The college had a very good reputation in North Carolina but had a long history of financial instability.  In 1912 the school changed its name to Greensboro College for Women; in 1919 it changed its name, again, to Greensboro College, a name it has retained to the present day. Since 1954 it has also admitted male students.

The Peacock — Farrow correspondence — between one man, whose daughter had lost her battle with illness and another, whose sick daughter, Mamie, had been forced to drop out of school — concerns the bill Farrow received for his daughter Mamie’s tuition bill for the spring term in 1899.  Farrow had been charged $136.55 for Mamie’s Penmanship, Spelling, Composition, Bible & Piano, Recitation classes, and for room and board, heating, lighting, and washing although she had attended for only 43 days and taken 33 lessons.

In the first, typed, letter above, dated 23 May 1900, Peacock wrote to Farrow, replying to a previous letter from Farrow dated 21 May 1900, in which Farrow had first complained about his tuition bill.  President Peacock appears to have been both deeply moved to sympathy and yet rather confused by the situation. In behalf of the college, he returned Farrow’s check, saying “We decidedly prefer to have your good will to any amount of money, and my personal friendship for you and your family would cause me to do anything in my power to have you perfectly satisfied.” He offered to correct any errors in the bill, inquired after Farrow’s health, and hoped that Mamie’s health was improving too.

In the second, handwritten letter, dated 25 May 1900, Farrow responded, saying “I don’t know what your rules are regulating such matters. It just doesn’t look right to me, but I am willing to abide by your decision”, and concluding that it would make no difference to their friendship.  He said both he and his daughter were now in better health.

Peacock’s financial generosity may help explain why Greensboro Female Academy very nearly went bankrupt in 1903 and was only saved by a last minute gift of $20,000 from a generous alumna. It may also explain why the Peacocks removed their library from Greensboro Female College and gave it to Trinity College, where it is known today as the Ethel Carr Peacock Memorial Collection. It may also explain why Peacock was replaced as President in the same year by Lucy H. Robertson, who became the first female college president in North Carolina history.

Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949.

Source: Leo Jenkins Papers, Manuscript # 360

Staff Person:  Dale Sauter

Description:  Certificate for Captain Leo W. Jenkins for completion of Special Services reserve training at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 1949. Jenkins served as a Major in World War II where he saw action at Guadalcanal, Guam and Iwo Jima. For his military service, Jenkins received the Bronze Star and two Presidential Citations. In 1947 Jenkins joined the faculty of East Carolina Teachers College, where he served as Dean until being elected as President of the college in 1960. He eventually was named Chancellor, and retired in 1978. date: 1949; creator: U.S. Marine Corps

Welcome to Falkland-Bruce School

The principal of Falkland School

Source:

Daily Reflector Negative Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection # 741.14.e.19

Staff Person: Lynette Lundin

Description:

The image is of the principal of the school, [Gaston Monk, Sr.?] who is standing next to a sign indicating “Welcome to Falkland-Bruce School.” The date on the negative envelop is April 22, 1958. The image is one of many that recorded the events in Pitt Co. from the 1920’s to 1960’s. David Jordan Whichard and Julian R. Whichard founded the newspaper in 1881. The Daily Reflector Negative Collection was a gift from Mr. Jordan Whichard and Mr. John Kent Cooke, Jr.

Father Maurice Tew and Children, 1961

Source: Daily Reflector Negative Collection East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741.26.a.7

Staff Person: Maury York

Description: Father Maurice Tew came to Greenville from West Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1935 to assist the priest at St. Peter’s Catholic Church. Charged with the responsibility of ministering to African Americans in the city, Father Maurice spearheaded the construction of a mission church on West Fifth Street. Named in honor of St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother, the church was dedicated on March 1, 1936. In 1956 the church built a school for African American children. The nuns who taught the eight grades lived in a convent across the street. Of the 170 students who enrolled in the school initially, most were not members of the Catholic Church. A man with good sense of humor, Father Maurice endeared himself to many, as this photograph would indicate. He employed both radio and television broadcasts as a means of outreach to the broader community. (Source: Greenville Times, June 26-July 9, 1991).

Father Maurice with Children

Pitt County Bookmobile

Source: Daily Reflector Image Collection (East Carolina Manuscript Collection #741.10.e.14)

Staff person: Matt Reynolds

Description:
This is an image of Pitt County’s second bookmobile from the spring of 1956.  Essentially operating as mobile libraries, bookmobiles were used to deliver books and other materials to areas that did not have traditional library buildings.  These programs were especially effective in granting access to rural and housebound people. This particular bookmobile was manufactured by the Gerstenslager Company.

Image of the Pitt County Bookmobile

Greenville High School 1922 Baseball Team

 

Source: Herman H. Duncan Collection  #921

Staff Person: Martha Elmore

Description: This photograph of the 1922 Greenville High School (Greenville, North Carolina) Baseball Team was used in the Greenville High School 1922 yearbook “The Tau.”  Kneeling team members from left to right are identified as Richard Williams, Wesley Harvey, Douglas West, Frank Harrington, Berry Jenkins, Robert Forbes and Cecil Satterthwaite.  Standing left to right are Wyatt Brown (manager), Jimmie Barber, Zero Brown, Fernando Satterthwaite, C. B. West, Herman H. Duncan and Cecil Bilbro.

Pungent Paragraphs from the New Louisburg College

Source: Thomas A. Person Papers, Manuscript Collection #303

Staff Person: Maury York

Description:

This promotional brochure describes changes that were taking place at Louisburg College in Louisburg, N.C. The college had opened in 1857 to educate young women. A fire in 1928 seriously damaged the handsome Greek Revival Main Building, and the Great Depression curtailed enrollment, causing the college to incur significant debt. In response to this crisis, in 1931 the college admitted young men for the first time. Enrollment increased significantly. In this optimistic description of the “new” college, Isabelle Ziegler, a teacher of foreign languages, offered her view of the spirit of the institution: “Spirit at Louisburg College is that Something which with one gusty effort has blown away forever all the dust and death of the ages and has filled the lungs of this old College with the clear, cold, glorious atmosphere of the heights, which has given these two hundred young men and women the mental, spiritual and physical energy to seize this old world and carry it on their shoulders with Homeric laughter to the very heights.”

Wahl-Coates Training School Philosophy Chart

Source:  Walhl-Coates School Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #6

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description:

The image below entitled “Relation of Training School to College” is an original design drawing for an illustration that appeared in The Training School issue of the East Carolina Teachers College Bulletin Vol. 30, No. 4 (August 1939). The design expressed the Wahl-Coates Training School’s philosophy of teacher education. The ink on cardboard design shows the Training School students and their pupils at the center of a radiating circle of educational levels including student teaching, child study and psychology courses, courses in education, and subject matter courses.

The Training School was an elementary school that provided student teaching opportunities for E.C.T.C. education students. It was located on the campus of East Carolina University until 1972, when the university and the city of Greenville built Wahl-Coates Public School on Fifth Street. Originally established as the Model School in 1922, the institution was renamed the Training School when it moved into a new building in 1928 (now the Messick Theatre Arts Center). In 1959, the school received its present name, Wahl-Coates, created in honor of Miss Dora Coates and Miss Frances Wahl, two former teachers and supervisors of the school during its formative years.

Wahl-Coates Training School Philosophy Chart

Wahl-Coates Training School Philosophy Chart

Source: Wahl-Coates School Collection, #6.1.a.5, Special Collections Department, J. Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University.

Travel for Academic Credit

Source: Paul Ricks Papers, University Archives #UA90-02, East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C.

Rick's Tour Bus

Rick's Tour Bus

Staff Person: Kacy Guill

Description:

In 1935, East Carolina Teachers College obtained the services of Paul T. Ricks as director of a new travel course designed to meet the needs of travel-hungry students. For the initial tour, more than a hundred students filled a large bus and several touring cars. The tours provided three hours of credit in geography, American literature, and history, and satisfied requirements for college electives or renewal credits for teacher certification. So great was the demand for these economical study-vacations that three separate three-week tours were operated the first summer and an expanded schedule of tours was arranged until the restrictions of World War II brought them to an end.

Click on the images to see an enlarged version.

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Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Source: Belvidere Academy Papers, East Carolina Manuscript Collection #4

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Staff Person: Jonathan Dembo

Description:

This small pamphlet details the life and death of Mary Jordan White, a student, teacher, and principal at Belvidere Academy, in Belvidere, a small, predominantly Quaker, village in Perquimans County, North Carolina. Established in the 1680s, Belvidere was one of the oldest communities in North Carolina. Its Quaker population survived many difficulties associated with their unpopular religious principles of non-violence, opposition to slavery, and refusal to serve in the military even during wartime. While many members of the community emigrated, a hard core remained. Miss White dedicated her life to preserving both her community and her faith by teaching and by example and through her leadership of Belvidere Academy. Shown above are the first two pages of the pamphlet.

Source: Belvidere Academy Papers (Manuscript Collection #4.1.b) Gift of William E. “Mickey” Elmore, 6/14/1999.

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909

Mary Jordan White 1859-1909