Category Archives: General SHS info

Thanksgiving week hours of operation

Doctor showing clock

Due to the holiday week, SHS will have a change in our normal operating hours.

Monday/Tuesday, Nov. 21 & 22:  normal hours

Wednesday, Nov. 23:  Open for patient care and pharmacy 1:30-4pm only.  We are open 8am-5pm for general business (dropping off immunization records, filling out medical releases, etc.) SHS will be closed 12:00-1:00pm for the lunch hour.

Thursday, Nov. 24-Sunday, Nov. 27:  CLOSED.  Enjoy the holiday break!

Don’t forget:  anytime SHS is closed, you still have access to medical advice.  Call 911 for emergencies, but if you just want to talk to a nurse about an issue, call 328-6841 and stay on the line to be transferred to our free, 24 hr nurse line. You can also find self care information for treating your problem on our webpage, or you can submit a question to gotquestions@ecu.edu

Happy Thanksgiving Pirates!!!

World Diabetes Day recipe

Our dietitian has shared a recipe in honor of World Diabetes Day that is a good snack for any day.

cherryalmondsnack

 

Cherry Almond Snack Mix

Ingredients

  • 4 cups sweetened oat square cereal or brown sugar-flavored oat biscuit cereal
  • 3/4 cup sliced almonds
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup dried cherries and/or golden raisins

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. In a 15x10x1-inch baking pan combine cereal and almonds.
  2. In a small bowl stir together melted butter, apple pie spice, and salt. Drizzle butter mixture over cereal mixture; toss to coat.
  3. Bake about 20 minutes or until almonds are toasted, stirring once.
  4. Cool in pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Stir in dried cherries.
  5. Cool completely. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week.

    Makes: 20, ¼ cup servings.

  • Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 82 calories, 3 g fat, 13 g carb, 1 g fiber, 6 g sugar, 2 g protein.

Quick Tip:

Mix and match your cereals, for example, combine 2 cups each of a brown sugar and a cinnamon flavored cereal.

 

Source: bhg.com/recipe

Get Smart About Antibiotics

ECU Student Health Services (SHS) is supporting Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, November 14-20, by sharing education and social media messages about when antibiotics are indicated, how to take them correctly, and why overuse contributes negatively to our health.  SHS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) want you to know why antibiotics are not always the answer and why SHS providers are so careful about only prescribing antibiotics when indicated, not just because a patient requests them.

The CDC has news this cold and flu season:  antibiotics do not touch viruses—never have, never will!  And it is not really news—it is a long-documented medical fact. Antibiotics can only treat illnesses caused by bacteria. Colds, the flu, most sore throats, bronchitis, and many sinus and ear infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. If you have a viral infection, antibiotics will not help you feel better or get well sooner. In fact, they can even be harmful.

Taking antibiotics when they are not needed is fueling an increase in drug-resistant bacteria, which cause infections that are more difficult, and sometimes even impossible, to cure. Almost all types of bacteria have become less responsive to antibiotic treatment. Heard of MRSA? These “superbugs” can quickly spread to family members, schoolmates and coworkers, and threaten our communities with illnesses that were once easily treatable. Combatting antibiotic resistance is a priority for CDC with estimates of more than 2 million resistant infections occurring annually in the United States alone.

When antibiotics are used for viral infections, you are not getting the best care. A course of antibiotics will not fight the virus, help you feel better, or lead to a quicker recovery. It may even be harmful. If you are diagnosed with a viral illness, SHS providers will give you advice on what to do to feel more comfortable while the immune system does its work. Suggestions might include drinking plenty of fluids, getting a lot of rest, using over the counter medications, using a cool mist humidifier, or gargling with salt water. Please help SHS continue its commitment to safe and smart antibiotic use by educating yourself about antibiotics.

antibiotic-usage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an antibiotic is prescribed for you, take it as directed and complete the entire course of medication, regardless of when you start feeling better.  Partial doses of antibiotics should not be saved “for next time”—this increases resistance and allows the bacteria to possibly come back stronger.  You should also know to never take medication prescribed for others—even if you have similar symptoms as your roommate or think you have the same illness as a friend, it is NEVER okay to share prescriptions or take a dose of antibiotics from another person.

As always, if you have ANY questions about their diagnosis, treatment plan, or how to help your symptoms, call us at 252-328-6841 or email us at gotquestions@ecu.edu.   For more information about the right way to use antibiotics, visit www.cdc.gov/getsmart.

Article adapted from CDC’s educational materials for Get Smart About Antibiotics week.

Cook something bold and pungent day!

In the midst of all the election fanfare, did you know yesterday was “Cook something bold and pungent” day????

WELL….if you need a dinner idea, here is one our dietitian passed along!

mexican-rice

MEXICAN SKILLET RICE

  (6 servings)

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound lean ground beef or turkey
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups cooked brown rice
  • 1 16-ounce can pinto beans, drained
  • 2 4-ounce cans diced green chiles
  • 1 medium fresh tomato, seeded and chopped (optional)
  • Fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)
  1. In large skillet over medium-high heat, cook meat until brown, stirring to crumble; drain. Return meat to skillet.
  2. Add onion, chili powder, cumin and salt; cook until onion is tender.
  3. Stir in rice, beans and chiles; thoroughly heat.
  4. Top with tomato and garnish with cilantro if desired. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts per serving: Calories, 313; Total Fat, 9g; Cholesterol, 29 mg; Sodium, 340 mg; Total Carbohydrate, 43 g; Dietary Fiber, 6 g; Protein,17 g

SOURCE: Recipe and image courtesy of the USA Rice Federation. For more information about rice, visit www.usarice.com

SIDE NOTES:

  1. If desired, lower the sodium further by cutting back or omitting the salt.

Nibbles for Health…..Craving-Driven Eating

popcorn

Craving-driven eating may be conscious or unconscious. You might see food and eat it just because it’s there, without even realizing it, which would be a case of mindless grazing. Or you might see the food, experience a craving, recognize that you are not hungry, and make a conscious choice to eat anyway. In contrast, hunger-driven eating is always conscious: hunger, as a physiological imperative, commands the presence of the mind.

All eating triggers (or the environmental stimuli that pull the strings of our appetite and provoke cravings) can be divided into the following eight categories: food characteristics, activities, settings (places), events, time, people, words, and weather.

  • Food Characteristics: smells, sights, and sounds.
  • Activities: TV, reading entertainment, thinking, problem solving, and socializing.
  • Settings: indoors (eating in, eating out), outdoors (backyard barbecue, picnic, drive-in).
  • Events: holidays, birthdays, weddings, parties, grief, anniversaries, stress days, and nighttime.
  • Time: breakfast time, brunch time, lunchtime, dinnertime, suppertime, and nighttime.
  • People: permission people (foodie friends, parents, comfort/support people), and stress people.
  • Words: health words, taste words, food words, food-processing words (roasted, grilled), and brand names.
  • Weather: inclement weather, picnic weather.

I love to go to the movies, not for the movie per say as much as for the popcorn and soda. I could have just eaten a 6-course meal and feel stuffed to the gills, but if you mention its movie time…I am all in for a buttery bucket of popcorn and a large soda. I may just sit there holding it, but I can’t go and NOT get some. This is a classic activity induced trigger.

How about you, do you have any environmental eating triggers? Consider challenging yourself for the next two weeks, and keep track of your eating. After eating, simply ask yourself ‘why’ you ate. If you ate out of hunger, you have nothing further to do. If, however, you ate out of a craving, then ask yourself what type of trigger it was that prompted your eating. After two weeks, draw conclusions about your key trigger vulnerabilities. Are you a “stress eater,” a “TV-watching eater,” an “eater-outer,” a “by-the-clock-eater?” Use the chart above to help you identify which trigger or triggers caused your craving.

 

Adapted from: Eating The Moment by Pavel G. Somov, Ph.D.

Written by Jeanne Finney, ECU SHS Dietitian.  Make an appointment with her by calling 252-328-6841; nutrition services are FREE for ECU students!

August Intersession Info

Reminder about summer fees/receiving care in August

Just a reminder…..now that classes are over, student fees are no longer covering services at SHS.  Any patient treated at SHS will have a $30 per visit charge from August 1-August 19)

To be eligible to make an appointment for care, you must have been registered this past spring or summer, AND be registered for the fall semester.  New, incoming Pirates are not eligible to receive care at SHS until move in (beginning Aug. 17th).

Student Health is open for general business (dropping off forms, requesting medical records, general information) from 7:30am-12noon & 1pm-5pm. Patient care hours (for appointments, dressing changes, pharmacy, etc) are 1:30pm-4pm daily Monday-Thursday, and 7:30am-11:30am on Friday. Please also note: SHS is CLOSED from 12pm-1pm for the lunch hour daily.

Center for Counseling and Student Development (CCSD) services may be limited during this period).

Questions?  Call SHS at (252) 328-6841 or CCSD at (252) 328-6661.

Have a healthy rest of summer and see you soon for move in!

Need SHS this summer?

The word summer written in the sand on a beach

Now that summer has come, many students are not taking classes but they would still like to utilize Student Health Service (SHS) or the Counseling Center (CCSD).  Not in summer school?  You may be eligible to still receive care at SHS & CCSD.

Did you just graduate?  Congratulations!  Due to anti-trust laws, SHS cannot continue to provide your healthcare, but we can 1) help you transfer your records to the office of your choice, 2) provide you with a list of local offices if you need help establishing care outside, or 3) we do have a 2 week grace period following graduation if you need to come in for a follow up of an existing problem (i.e. to get a medication refilled, or to finish up treatment for a particular problem or concern).

If you did not graduate, but are just not taking classes in summer school, you may still be eligible for care at SHS and/or CCSD.  In order to qualify for services at SHS/CCSD in the summer when you are not taking classes,

          • you must have been enrolled this past spring AND
          • you must be registered for fall classes

If you meet those criteria, you can be seen at SHS/CCSD for a special summer fee.  The summer fee is necessary because you are not taking classes for the summer or paying any tuition, so you are not paying the usual health fee.  To pay the health fee for either SHS or CCSD service, stop by the Student Health Center.

There are 2 options for paying the summer fee for care at SHS:
Per visit fee $30.00
OR
Need multiple visits? Pay $60.00 for unlimited visits per summer session.

Need care at CCSD?  One option is available:
$60.00 per session (the per visit fee is not available for CCSD service)

First summer session fees are charged May 16-June 21.
Second summer session fees are charged June 22-July 29.

Once summer classes end, the only option for the fee is $30 per visit from August 1-August 19. (CCSD’s services may be limited during this period)

Questions?  Call SHS at (252) 328-6841 or CCSD at (252) 328-6661.

Have a healthy summer!

May Intersession Hours

Now that spring semester is coming to a close, Student Health Service has a change in operating hours for the May Intersession period, May 9-13.

Our office is closed Monday, May 9, for a staff development event. We will also be closed Thursday, May 12, for a divisional event.

Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday (May 10, 11, and 13) Student Health is open for general business (dropping off forms, requesting medical records, general information) from 7:30am-12noon & 1pm-5pm. Patient care hours (for appointments, dressing changes, pharmacy, etc) are 1:30pm-4pm daily on Tuesday and Wednesday, and 7:30am-11:30am on Friday. Please also note: SHS is CLOSED from 12pm-1pm for the lunch hour daily.

There are no weekend hours for intersession or for summer semesters.

A visit fee is required during this period to be seen as a patient at SHS. The fee is $30 per visit, in addition to any other charges you may incur during your appointment (lab, pharmacy, xray, etc). The reason there is a visit fee is because during intersession, no student fees are supporting campus services. We are open as a courtesy and convenience to students even when there are no classes, but your tuition and fees do not cover this period of service.

If you need care when SHS is not open, do not forget about our free 24 hour nurse line. Just call our main number below and wait on the line. This service is available to all ECU students.

For more information about our intersession hours or the visit fee for service, call us at (252) 328-6841.

blue-cross-blue-shield-logoGreat news!!!  ECU Student Health Services is now an in-network provider for BlueCross BlueShield health insurance plans!

Students with BlueCross BlueShield (BCBS) health insurance plans now can utilize Student Health Services (SHS) just as they do any other participating provider.  SHS will file any charges to the insurance plan and coverage will be determined by the plan benefits and policy terms.  Deductibles, co-insurance, and any out of pocket amounts are determined by the individual policy; we encourage students and parents to become familiar with what their BCBS plan covers as well as any exclusions or limitations that may be stipulated.

Students desiring to file their BCBS insurance MUST bring a copy of their current insurance information and present it upon check in when they come for visits at SHS.  If the policy holder is a parent, the student must also provide that parent’s name, date of birth, and address.

There is no co-pay at SHS because the student fees paid with tuition cover the office visit charge.  Distance education students do not pay student fees, so they will be subject to a $30 SHS access fee for each visit.

Any charges that are not covered by a student’s BCBS plan will be sent to the Cashier’s Office and applied to the student’s main tuition bill.  Those charges should be paid timely to avoid issues with registration, obtaining grades, or requesting transcripts.

For more information, call us at (252) 328-6841 or e-mail gotquestions@ecu.edu.

 

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