Pirates rally for day of giving back

Alumni and friends of East Carolina University proved that the Servire spirit is alive both on and off campus. Pirate Nation Gives Back, the first-ever stand-alone day of service and philanthropy at ECU, was an overwhelming success on March 22 with more than $273,000 raised and hundreds of hours of service reported.

Chancellor Cecil Staton and his wife, Catherine, charted the course with their $100,000 commitment to endow a fund supporting international travel and educational opportunities for ECU students.

“Thank you to Pirate Nation for your generosity in giving of your time, talent and treasure,” said Chris Dyba, vice chancellor for university advancement. “To start the day off with a leadership gift, in all senses of the phrase, was phenomenal. Donor support of ECU’s students, faculty and facilities is key as we strive to be recognized as America’s next great national university.”

Members from across ECU’s community came together not only to raise money but also to support many charitable service activities. Local organizations including the Food Bank of North Carolina, American Red Cross, ECU’s Campus Kitchen and Pirate P.A.L.S. (Peers Advocating for Learning and Success) opened their doors to volunteers and donors. The East Carolina Alumni Association’s Pitt County Chapter collaborated with the City of Greenville Public Works Department for Community Tree Day, planting nearly 100 trees on the new section of the Greenville Greenway. Additionally, the North Carolina Chapter of the ALS Association partnered with ECU Athletics to collect funds at the UNC vs. ECU baseball game that day.

Stand-alone days of giving have become a popular way for universities to gain donors’ attention and financial support. Combining service and philanthropy helps to set ECU apart in a crowded landscape.

“Since East Carolina’s founding, service has been at the heart of our mission, our teaching and how we continue our day-to-day relationship with the institution,” said Dr. Ron Mitchelson, provost and senior vice chancellor for academic affairs. “Pirate Nation Gives Back is the pinnacle of this philosophy as we seek to serve others, giving of our time, sharing our special gifts and supporting ECU through charitable contributions.”

To learn more about Pirate Nation Gives Back or to donate to East Carolina University, visit www.ecu.edu/give.

 

 

-by Nicole Wood, ECU Advancement

 

Living the motto: Faculty, staff and students recognized for service

East Carolina University honored faculty, staff and students for living the university’s motto – Servire, to serve – during an event March 22 as part of Chancellor Cecil Staton’s installation week.

More than 100 members of the university community were honored at Harvey Hall; afterwards many of the group walked over to Clark-LeClair Baseball Stadium to see the Pirates take on the UNC-Chapel Hill Tar Heels.

“The honorees tonight represent the very best of our university. They are talented and engaged and committed to transforming our community, North Carolina and the world,” said Staton in his welcome to honorees and guests. “Service is among the hallmark characteristics of this university, and one that sets us apart.”

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton.
(Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Staton presented the first award of the event, the James R. Talton Leadership Award, to Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance.

The award for servant leadership is in honor of the outstanding life and work of James R. Talton Jr., a former chair of the ECU Board of Trustees and a lifelong Pirate.

A nomination letter said of Gilbert: “His philosophy of leadership helps every person feel as though his or her voice is important and his or her contributions are essential to the success of the team. Dean Gilbert is committed to many great initiatives throughout eastern North Carolina, but perhaps most impressive is his unwavering support for our country’s servicemen and women.”

Also recognized were recipients of diversity and inclusion awards, presented by the Office of Equity and Diversity. Recipients, who can be faculty, staff, students or teams, are engaged in meaningful diversity and inclusion activities in addition to or extending beyond their primary responsibility at the university.

Honored were faculty member Dr. Nicole Caswell, the director of the University Writing Center and assistant professor in the Department of English; staff member Mark Rasdorf, associate director for the LGBT Resource Office in Intercultural Affairs; senior art major Janae Brown; and the Department of Sociology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Service Fellows Internship program were recognized by Jama Dagenhart, executive director of the State Employees Credit Union Foundation.

The internships are a component of the larger Public Service Fellows program, led by Dr. Sharon Paynter, assistant vice chancellor for public service and community relations.

Recognized were Eva Gallardo, Lauren Barkand, Toni Abernathy, Ashley Cromie, Lucas Merriam, James Kidd, Damiere Powell, Alexis Everette, Lee Hodges, Andrew Strong, Taylor Nelson, Stephanie Minor, Hope Stuart, Connor Hoffman, Matthew Barrier, Andrew DiMeglio and Nelson Martinez-Borja.

 The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The annual Centennial Awards for Excellence recognize contributors in each of the following four areas: Ambition, Leadership, Service and Spirit.
The recipients represent one staff member, one faculty member, and one other contributor —a member of the administration or an administrative team, a second staff member or a staff team, or a second faculty member or faculty team. Winners are selected from peer nominations and selection by the Centennial Awards for Excellence Selection Committee.
The team honored for ambition was the North Carolina Literary Review Staff: Margaret Bauer, Diane Rodman, Liza Wieland, Christy Hallberg and Randall Martoccia for innovation and commitment to “showcase the best … authors and scholars.”

Dr. Wendy Sharer was the faculty honoree in leadership for her transformative work leading ECU’s Quality Enhancement Plan, establishing the University Writing Center, founding a sophomore-level writing course and coordinating writing liaisons from disciplines across the university.

The staff honoree in leadership was John Gill, campus landscape architect, for his leadership in education and research, and leadership to the university and regional community in improving environmental quality.

The honoree in leadership for the “other” category was Ernest Marshburn for many years of institutional and public service with the Office of Research Development and as a volunteer in recreational boating safety.

Dr. Mary Jackson was the faculty honoree in the service category for her service in helping those who suffer from substance use disorders by enhancing the training program at ECU and working with military personnel who are trying to overcome their own addictions.

The Tedi Bear Child Advocacy Team was the team honoree for their service in providing a nationally recognized child advocacy center. The team members are Julie Gill, Ann Parsons, Cassandra Hawkins, Latoya Mobley, Katie Wood, Lauren Miller, Rebecca Yoder, Wendy Shouse, Mary Curry, Andora Hankerson, Melanie Meeks, Kelly Baxter, Kia Glosson, Lacy Hobgood, Coral Steffey and Matthew Ledoux.

This year’s staff recipient was Lori Lee for her undaunted commitment to ECU, her steadfast support for Faculty Senate, its officers and committees, and unparalleled dedication to ECU’s system of shared governance.

Employee Steven Asby was the final spirit award honoree in the “other” category for his unwavering support of the Pirate Nation, his volunteer work with student-athletes, and his commitment to first-generation students.
The Servire Society recognized 22 first-time inductees, 12 members were recognized for two to four years and 20 were honored for five to eight years of membership.

Each Servire Society member has contributed 100 or more hours of volunteer service – without compensation and outside his or her normal realm of duties – to the community at large within the previous year.

 The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The following members of the ECU community were recognized Austin Allen, Crissa Allen, Mona Amin, Terah Archie, David Batie, Sheresa Blanchard, Craig Brown, Nicole Caswell, Lisa Compton, Sahil Dayal, Daniel Dickerson, Denise Donica, Lori Earls, Sylvia Escott Stump, Tina Mickey, Nicole Fox, Amy Frank, Sylvia Fuller, Lou Anna Hardee, Dawn Harrison, Archana Hegde, Jason Higginson, Jennifer Hodgson, Pamela Hopkins, Jakob Jensen, Plummer Jones, Andrea Kitta, Angela Lamson, Kim Larson, Janice Lewis, Huigang Liang, Aaron Lucier, Susan McCammon, Vivian Mott, Sandra Nobles, Patty Peebles, Annette Peery, Nancy Ray, April Reed, Leah Riddell, Jonelle Romero, Melanie Sartore, Lorie Sigmon, Robert Stagg, Jamie Williams, Marsha Tripp, Tracy Tuten, Deborah Tyndall, Garrett VanHoy, Sandra Warren, Bryan Wheeler, Courtney Williams, Yajiong Xue and Breyah Atkinson.

As he congratulated all of those recognized, Provost Ron Mitchelson said their service to the community and others “is a great testimony to a great university.”

He added, “So much of this work is quiet. I think it’s good for the university to shine a bright light on these efforts.”

 

 

-by Jeannine Manning Hutson, ECU News Services

 

ECU’s Joyner Library offers books of the human genre

Joyner Library at East Carolina University will host its fourth annual Human Library event on Tuesday, March 28, to allow students and community visitors a chance to check out human beings for a 10-15 minute conversation. The event serves to open more dialogue on campus and for participants to learn more about people of all beliefs, walks of life, abilities and backgrounds.

(contributed photos)

(contributed photos)

The preselected human books will be volunteers from diverse backgrounds with interesting life stories to share. From 1-4 p.m. in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery, located on the library’s second floor, attendees can check out one of more than 30 human books based on their book titles and descriptions. They will have a conversation with that person including a chance to ask questions to clarify misconceptions and learn more about that topic.

At least two of this year’s human books will share their personal stories of living the life of a refugee.

“I feel like it is important for ECU students and people in the community to see the faces and speak directly to a few refugees,” said Katy Webb, Head of Research and Instructional Services for Joyner Library. “I believe they will hear the strength, resilience and hope from people who are often labeled and minimized.”

Webb brought the event to ECU in 2014 as part of her role on the university’s diversity committee with co-sponsorship from the Friends of Joyner Library.

Webb said the library’s diversity committee members contacted several organizations on campus, including the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Resource Office, many student organizations and a local synagogue for volunteers willing to share their stories.

All areas of diversity, defined by The Office for Equity and Diversity, will be represented at this year’s event. Human book titles offered this year include “A Tale of Two Moms,” “No Animal Products Included,” “Living Life as a Traveler” and more.

For more information about the event please contact Katy Webb at kavanaghk@ecu.edu or (252) 328-0734.

 

 

-by Kelly Dilda, Joyner Library

ECU School of Art and Design to host annual Undergraduate Exhibition

The School of Art and Design’s annual Undergraduate Exhibition will be on display March 23-April 7 in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center.

More than 145 undergraduate students will exhibit work in animation, art foundations, ceramics, cinema, drawing, graphic design, illustration, interactive media, metals, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, textile design and video.

Artwork designed by ECU student Vincent Li is will be on display at 2017 Undergraduate Exhibition. (contributed photo)

Artwork designed by ECU student Vincent Li is will be on display at 2017 Undergraduate Exhibition. (contributed photo)

Winners will be announced during an awards ceremony at 5 p.m. Thursday, March 23 in Speight Auditorium. A reception will be held immediately following the ceremony. This year’s judge is Harriet Hoover, coordinator of teen and college programming at the NC Museum of Art in Raleigh.

The exhibition, awards ceremony and reception are free and open to the public.

The Gray Gallery and Speight Auditorium are located in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center at 5th and Jarvis streets. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The gallery is closed during university holidays.

The center is handicapped accessible. Individuals with disabilities who require accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the Department of Disability Support Services at least two weeks prior to the event at 252-737-1016. For more information, go to www.ecu.edu/art/.

Go to www.ecu.edu/graygallery or contact Tom Braswell, interim gallery director, at 252-328-1312 for more information.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity

 

ECU assistant dean awarded AAMC fellowship

The assistant dean for undergraduate medical education assessment and outcomes at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University has been selected to participate in a national leadership certificate program.

Dr. Stephen Charles was recently named a 2017 Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Fellow by a panel of his peers in the Southern Group on Educational Affairs, a regional division of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

Dr. Stephen Charles. (Contributed photo)

Dr. Stephen Charles. (Contributed photo)

The LEAD Program is an intensive, one-year, cohort-based leadership development certificate program that provides a firm foundation in the best practices and recognized theoretical models of effective educational leadership that are key to advancing medical education at all levels. LEAD is offered in four concurrent cohorts, one based in each of the four regions of the AAMC Group on Educational Affairs. Across the nation 107 fellows have completed the program since 2009.

Charles joined the Brody School of Medicine in 2016. In his role as assistant dean, he leads efforts to develop, implement and maintain an active outcomes assessment program and to grow a portfolio of scholarship related to current and future medical education innovations and changes.

He also serves as the liaison between Brody’s Office of Medical Education, the ECU Office of Simulation and Safety Education, and the ECU Office of Clinical Skills Assessment and Education; and he collaborates with other education leaders across the ECU Division of Health Sciences to assess and enhance interprofessional education.

Charles is certified as a health care simulation educator and as a medical education researcher. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Association of Standardized Patient Educators and as chair of the Interprofessional Education Affinity Group for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.

“I’m honored to be chosen for this prestigious fellowship, and I’m excited to represent ECU and the Brody School of Medicine,” said Charles. “I look forward to gaining more knowledge, skills and experience that I can share with my colleagues to help us all become more effective educational leaders.”

The AAMC is a not-for-profit association dedicated to transforming health care through innovative medical education, cutting-edge patient care, and groundbreaking medical research. Its members comprise a range of academic and medical institutions, including all 147 accredited U.S. and 17 accredited Canadian medical schools and nearly 400 major teaching hospitals and health systems.

 

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communication

ECU conducts the first Makeathon with a focus on Natural Disasters.

(Contributed photo)

(Contributed photo)

On March 19, East Carolina University’s Innovation Design Lab in the Office of Innovation and Economic Development supports the first InnovateECU Makeathon designed and conducted by Honors College Interns.

Students welcomed the opportunity to work collaboratively and think critically to create and propose solutions to a real-world issue. This year’s innovation theme revolved around disaster relief and prevention. With the recent damage eastern North Carolina suffered as a result of Hurricane Matthew, students found this theme to be of critical importance and value.

The student teams were challenged to think critically about how to create disaster relief efforts that prepare, respond to and recover our community. Over 30 participants from multiple disciplines formed into six teams to create, prototype, and pitch their solutions in this two-day event. The students competed for development funding and Innovation Design Lab support to continue to strengthen the design and implementation of their concepts.

 

 

-by Wayne Godwin, ECU Advance Manufacturing & Innovation Academy  

Joyner exhibit showcases trappings of early healthcare

Joyner Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “The Sick Room: Invalid Feeders and Bedside Necessities” in the Verona Joyner Langford North Carolina Collection on the third floor of the library. The exhibit, open through the month of May, showcases a variety of items — both beautiful and useful — that helped ease invalids back to health during the Victorian Period.

(Contributed photos)

(Contributed photos)

Caring for a sick family member was a common part of life, and any bedroom could become the “sick room” where a convalescing patient would rest undisturbed from the difficulties of life.

“The exhibit gives us a better understanding of what life was like taking care of sick family members during the late 19th century,” said Anne Anderson, exhibit curator for the Country Doctor Museum. “This responsibility usually fell to the woman of the household, and much of her time might have been spent using the types of objects featured in the exhibit.

“This concept still connects to us today where an illness can have a huge impact on family life.”

On loan from the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, North Carolina, the exhibit includes feeders, baby rattles, bedpans, and an invalid chair.

The exhibit also offers many pieces from the private collection of Brenda Rewalt of Bolivia, North Carolina, a retired nurse who has collected more than 700 feeders and related items, some dating back to the 1700s.

“Brenda Rewalt’s collection of invalid feeders is one of the best in the country, and the Country Doctor Museum is very fortunate to include some of her beautiful pieces in this exhibit,” said Anderson. “Her knowledge about the objects, both as a collector and nurse, helped inform the exhibit’s interpretation of life in the sick room.”

On April 6 from 1-3 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Joyner Library, Anderson will offer students an opportunity to participate in a related hands-on activity. Students will grind up medicinal herbs such as eucalyptus, rosemary and peppermint to make medicinal herb sachets, while Anderson and other Joyner Special Collections staff speak on how these herbs were used as home remedies, particularly in sick rooms.

Activities will continue on the third floor, and students are also encouraged to visit the exhibit and use the iPad kiosk to vote on their favorite exhibit item. Results will be posted to Joyner Library’s social media platforms.
“This is our first exhibit installation at Joyner Library and we are very grateful for the opportunity to share our passion for medical history with a new audience,” said Anderson.

For additional information, please contact the Country Doctor Museum at 252-235-4165 or email Anne Anderson, andersonan@ecu.edu.

 

 

-by Kelly Dilda, Joyner Library

 

Taft STEM Education Lecture on March 27

Dr. Len Annetta, the College of Education’s Taft Distinguished Professor of Science Education, cordially invites you to attend the inaugural Taft STEM Education Lecture on Monday, March 27 pm in Speight 203 at 6:00 pm. The event is free and open to students, faculty and the public.

This College of Education is introducing this lecture series in order to ignite new ideas in teaching and learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. The Taft STEM Education Lecture Series will bring international knowledge and discovery from some of the most well-known scholars in the field to Eastern North Carolina. The lectures will provide opportunities to ECU students, faculty, and K-12 schools to meet and collaborate with these scholars while increasing the visibility of ECU’s commitment to STEM education.

Dr. Orit Ben Zvi Assraf of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel is the featured speaker for the March 27 Taft STEM Education Lecture. Dr. Assraf will discuss taking a s systems approach to teaching about human biology.

 

 

-by Terah B. Archie, College of Education

ECU celebrates International Women’s Day

While policies and programs protecting women from violence have improved in the last 20 years, this progress is in danger of not being renewed or funded in the near future, according to a national expert who spoke to students and faculty at East Carolina University on March 2.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the university’s celebration of International Women’s Day, hosted by the Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women, the Office for Equity and Diversity, and the women’s studies program. Nearly 70 people attended the event, which was held a few days early since the actual observation on March 8 fell during spring break.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

“All around the world, in spite of different cultural norms, what I find is that there are more similarities than differences,” said Campbell, who has studied gender-based violence for 20 years in several countries. “Women’s physical security is significantly associated with global peace and economic development.”

Women are killed by a partner or an ex at nine times the rate they are killed by a stranger, according to Campbell. There are more homicides of women in the U.S. than many other countries around the world, she added.

In the U.S., the Violence Against Women Act is up for renewal every five years, and is next due in 2018, she said. “This year is when we lay the groundwork, but it is in serious peril.”

The North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, which receives federal grants, is also in danger of losing funding, a participant told the audience.

Campbell presented several more statistics about violence against women in the U.S. and around the world, and also shared several organizations that are working to combat the problem, from Pigs for Peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to One Love Foundation, founded in memory of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia student who was beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend in 2010.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

“Our solutions have to be effective at many different levels: cultural, economic and individual,” Campbell said. “I’m thrilled to be part of this celebration of International Women’s Day at ECU. And I’m pleased as punch to see a few men in the room. This can’t just be a women’s issue.”

International Women’s Day, which started in the U.S. in the 1910s, celebrates the achievements of women everywhere and acknowledges the challenges they face. The Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women began leading ECU’s celebrations in 2014.

Following the keynote luncheon, organizers held a call to action session that showcased campus and community organizations, like the Center for Family Violence Prevention in Greenville, so participants could get involved and stay active. The day ended with a screening and panel discussion of the movie “Embrace,” which depicts the story of Taryn Brumfitt, founder of the Body Image Movement.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women

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