Pirate Nation represents at iconic Boston Marathon

The 121st Boston Marathon was a memorable one for at least three East Carolina University alumni.

Tim Meigs ’89 won his age group. Dionne Evans ’95 ran her second Boston after finishing her first one in 2013 just three minutes before the first bomb went off near the finish line. And Louis Kinlaw ’04 ran his first Boston and was wearing his Pirates hat all 26.2 miles.

“I was pretty excited,” Meigs said about his time. “I didn’t know until I got my cell phone out of my gear bag and checked text messages. My wife had texted me and said that it looked like I had won.”

Tim Meigs ’84 running through the streets of Boston during the 121st Boston Marathon. Meigs would finish first in his age group. (photo courtesy of Tim Meigs)

Tim Meigs ’84 running through the streets of Boston during the 121st Boston Marathon. Meigs would finish first in his age group. (photo courtesy of Tim Meigs)

Meigs graduated with a biology degree and is part of the biology department’s advancement council. He is a patent lawyer for Becton Dickinson and lives in Raleigh. He’s a relatively new runner, having started running about 10 years ago, just before he turned 40.

“I ran a little bit in high school but not particularly well. It was kind of like a midlife crisis sort of thing getting into it later,” he said with a chuckle.

Now 50 years old and having finished nearly two dozen marathons, Meigs ran this year’s Boston Marathon in 2:41:48. That time was the fastest in his 50-to-54 age group, which comprised 2,205 male runners. He finished 221st overall, out of 30,074 runners. He had previously finished third in 2012 and fourth in 2013 in the 45-49 age group at Boston. For his victory, he received a vase trophy during the awards ceremony and the opportunity to run his ninth Boston Marathon next year.

“Given the stature of the race and the amount of competition, I’d say this one is probably the biggest one (win). I’d probably put this one at the top of the list,” Meigs said. “It’s kind of fun to be able to do this. Hoping I can run another one and go back next year and run well there, too, but you can’t take these things for granted.”

Dionne Evans (right) poses with Boston Police Commissioner William B. Evans. In 2013, then Superintendent Evans played an integral part in the investigation and eventual arrest of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. He was portrayed in the movie “Patriots Day” by actor James Colby. Incidentally, for both of them, this was their first Boston Marathon since the bombing; they both ran it in 2013. Dionne ran in her second Boston while the commissioner ran in his 19th. (photo courtesy of Dionne Evans)

Dionne Evans (right) poses with Boston Police Commissioner William B. Evans. In 2013, then Superintendent Evans played an integral part in the investigation and eventual arrest of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. He was portrayed in the movie “Patriots Day” by actor James Colby. Incidentally, for both of them, this was their first Boston Marathon since the bombing; they both ran it in 2013. 
(photo courtesy of Dionne Evans)

Like Meigs, Evans ran Boston in 2013 and had completed the course when the first bomb exploded. She was about a block away from the blast.

“I was close enough to feel it, hear it, see the big plume, hear the people screaming at the finish line,” Evans said.

This year she said it felt like she had come full circle when she crossed the finish line.

“I was crying uncontrollably and I couldn’t stop myself. There were people coming up to me, hugging me because they knew the story because I had run part of the race with them,” said Evans.

Evans graduated with an exercise sports science degree and is a personal trainer at Champions Health & Fitness in Greenville. She has always been physically active but decided to take up long distance running only about 10 years ago with some friends. That first half-marathon has now turned into 13 full marathons.

“I just love it. The way I feel mentally, just the sense of accomplishment. I just don’t get that anywhere else,” she said.

Temperatures this year were in the mid-60s when the race began – warmer than what most long distance runners prefer. Evans said she struggled to get to the finish line because of the warmer temperatures and is not happy with her time of 4:29:44. However, as she closed in on the final meters of her run, it was all worth it.

“When you hit Boylston and you hit that finish line, I’m getting chills just thinking about it because it’s so overwhelming,” Evans said. “My goal now is to qualify for 2019.”

(Left) Louis Kinlaw ’04 sporting his ECU hat and his wife Shannon ‘14 a Brody graduate took a photo together before the race. (Right) Kinlaw poses with his finishers medal. (photo courtesy of Louis Kinlaw)

(Left) Louis Kinlaw ’04 sporting his ECU hat and his wife Shannon ‘14 a Brody graduate took a photo together before the race. (Right) Kinlaw poses with his finishers medal.
(photo courtesy of Louis Kinlaw)

All along the Boston streets, Pirate pride was welling inside of Kinlaw. He graduated from ECU in industrial technology and is an engineering group leader with Bosch Home Appliances in New Bern. Every race he runs, he wears one of his East Carolina hats. Even though Boston is a long way away from Greenville, he didn’t feel far from home.

“You just have 26 miles of people just cheering you on. At least every couple of miles I’d hear a ‘Go Pirates’ or a ‘Go ECU’ or something like that,” Kinlaw said.

This was Kinlaw’s second marathon. He qualified for Boston during his first marathon. He said he’s always been a runner but got into long-distance running four years ago with a half-marathon, like Evans. While Kinlaw’s Boston time of 3:22:50 would be many runners’ personal best, he is looking to do better the next time.

“It was painful at the end, but it was probably one of the best experiences of my life,” Kinlaw said. “When you turn onto Boylston Street for the finish, there are thousands of people there. It was a pretty surreal moment for me – pretty emotional to see that and to experience that.”

 

 

-by Rich Klindworth 

Annual High School STEM Day Brings 300 Students to ECU

Nearly 300 high school juniors from across eastern North Carolina recently visited East Carolina University (ECU) to experience and learn more about Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) opportunities offered at the University. ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology, the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Education, including the STEM Center for Education, sponsored the event and provided more than 60 volunteers.

Students rotated through three of 15 hands-on, engaging sessions that were taught by current ECU faculty and students. Departments represented included engineering, physics, technology, mathematics, chemistry, biology, construction management, computer science, geology, geography, atmospheric science, math and science education.

Some of the hands-on learning sessions included:

  • Learning about and how to extract DNA
  • Determining the types of clays that might be addressed on a construction site
  • Exploring how high-resolution 3D models are captured using a simulation of unmanned aircraft systems, and how to analyze and visualize environmental change
  • Using cryptography to send secure messages and how it is used in the military for confidential communication and secure online banking, shopping and other applications
Area high school juniors recently visited ECU for the sixth annual High School Stem Day. Fifteen hands-on sessions were scheduled that represented a wide variety of education opportunities available at the University. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Area high school juniors recently visited ECU for the sixth annual High School Stem Day. Fifteen hands-on sessions were scheduled that represented a wide variety of education opportunities available at the University. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

This annual event was the second STEM-related event held at ECU in as many weeks. Earlier, more than 140 area Girl Scouts participated in TechnoQuest, which also was designed to introduce STEM to the participants.

Margaret Turner, director of marketing and outreach for ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology, helped organize both events and also helped organize the five former high school STEM Days. Over the years, she’s noticed a very obvious increase in students interested in STEM. Not only does STEM Day introduce these students to exciting and interesting careers, Turner enjoys introducing these students to a university that can help them capture their future, STEM-related degrees.

“I see the excitement in the students faces every time they step on campus and into the sessions,” said Turner. “I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to let them know that if they do pursue a STEM-related career, ECU is a great choice to get them started.

Students Managing Students

Helping Turner organize this year’s event were three college students pursuing their own STEM-related degrees in engineering. Juniors Jessica Campos, Meagan Smith, and Malik Simon provided Turner with project management support. As part of a class assignment in an engineering project management course, they helped Turner with everything from volunteer training, the session schedule, transportation and communication.

“STEM day was an effective way to show how much detail goes into planning an event,” said Smith. “There were months of meetings that involved brainstorming on how to improve the planning process and ways to improve how the day would flow.”

Part of that brainstorming saw the introduction of social media to help with communication between all volunteers. The application that was used is called GroupMe.

Juniors Meagan Smith (left), Jessica Campos (right) and Malik Simon (not pictured) provided project management support for High School STEM Day. This marked the first time students played a role in managing the event.

Juniors Meagan Smith (left), Jessica Campos (right) and Malik Simon (not pictured) provided project management support for High School STEM Day. This marked the first time students played a role in managing the event.

“We had volunteers outside Wright circle waiting for high schools to drop off their students, and with this app, our volunteers were able to tell us what schools were here, where to meet them, the final number of students they brought and more,” said Campos. “Throughout the day we were able to communicate any issues that arose using GroupMe, and with everyone’s input, we were able to resolve those issues.”

“Throughout the day we were able to communicate any issues that arose using GroupMe, and with everyone’s input, we were able to resolve those issues.”

“Jessica, Meagan and Malik did a wonderful job in helping make sure we had another successful STEM day,” added Turner. “I think they learned a great deal about the many logistics involved in organizing such a large event. They were also proud to see the event happen and go smoothly and realize they had a large part in planning it.”

This was the first time college students helped with managing the event.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication 

Pilot program updates area geriatric providers via webinar

Primary care providers who treat the elderly across eastern North Carolina recently received vital continuing education without ever leaving their offices, thanks to a pilot program provided by East Carolina University and Eastern Area Health Education Center.

The new Geriatric Medicine Academy is a series of six weekly lunchtime webinars that took place March 7 through April 11, with more sessions planned for the future. Leaders from the College of Nursing, College of Allied Health Sciences, Brody School of Medicine and the community gave the one-hour presentations from The Education Center at Eastern AHEC, which webcasted the sessions to providers throughout the region. The program is funded by the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program through the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Open to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists and others, this pilot program was limited to the first 25 participants – and filled up on the first day of registration.

“I think that speaks to a great need in our area. We’re enhancing the ability of providers to meet the needs of an aging population,” said Karen Goble, assistant director for continuing medical, dental and pharmacy education at Eastern AHEC, a non-profit affiliated with ECU.

Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy, participated in the new Geriatric Medicine Academy webinars from her office in Goldsboro. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy, participated in the new Geriatric Medicine Academy webinars from her office in Goldsboro. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Between 2000 and 2010, the largest increases in North Carolina’s age 65 and older population were seen in Brunswick, New Hanover and other eastern counties, according to the University of North Carolina Population Center.

“We have a large retirement population,” Goble said. “We’re an area of high priority.”

There are very few board-certified geriatric medicine physicians in the country, according to Goble.

“There’s a big gap across the U.S.,” she said. “Brody has geriatric medicine. Our goal is to bring this knowledge to the clinics in our area; we need to take it to them.”

From Currituck to Carteret, participants tuned in from across eastern North Carolina, accessing ECU’s expertise to help their patients without having to travel.

“A webinar is a very convenient way to earn continuing education credit, especially during lunch,” said participant Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy in Goldsboro. “Having a set of webinars specifically on dealing with issues regarding the elderly is of interest to me. I have an increasing number of retirees in my practice setting as well as aging parents so I was excited to see this program offered.”

The program covered a variety of topics, such as caregiver burnout, HIV in older adults, opioids and pain, frailty, polypharmacy (managing multiple prescriptions) as well as health care for older veterans.

“The session on HIV in older adults was especially informative,” Pender said. “It was eye opening to me to learn that 50 percent of HIV patients are over the age of 50. The presenter gave a great refresher on the mechanisms of action of the HIV medications, which was very helpful.”

The opening session focused on recognizing and preventing caregiver burnout.

“We might be living longer, but we’re living sicker; the goal is to stay healthier,” said presenter Kim Stokes, director of clinical education for the Department of Physician Assistant Studies in the College of Allied Health Sciences. “For the elderly, a caregiver could be a spouse or a whole team.”

More than 50 million Americans care for family members of all ages, according to Stokes.

“The definition of caregiver has expanded exponentially,” Stokes said. “The health and well-being of a patient and caregiver are closely linked.”

The purpose of the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement grant, which awarded $2.5 million in 2015 to the College of Nursing and its partners, is to develop a health care workforce that maximizes patient and family engagement and improves health outcomes for older adults by integrating geriatrics with primary care, according to Dr. Sonya Hardin, associate dean for graduate programs in the College of Nursing and the grant’s primary investigator.

“Our geriatrics funding helps prepare health care providers to meet the needs of the aging U.S. population and ensure improved health results for older adults,” said Hardin, who led the March 21 session on opioid use and abuse in older adults.

The response to the first round of webinars has been positive, according to Goble, and more sessions are planned for the future.

For more information on the Geriatric Medicine Academy, visit www.easternahec.net or contact Karen Goble at 252-744-6974 or goblek16@ecu.edu. For additional resources under the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Grant, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/nursing/geriatric/.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, AHEC

IEEE Installs New Honors Chapter at ECU

The College of Engineering and Technology recently witnessed history. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)-Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) Mu Lambda Chapter was recently installed at the college. The new chapter, as part of its ceremonies, also inducted three area professionals and seven engineering students as its charter members.

The IEEE HKN Mu Lambda Chapter charter members include:

  1. Bryan Barrera, senior
  2. Davis Harrison, junior
  3. Dean Lamonica, senior
  4. Michael David Soule, senior
  5. Keith Hill, engineering & facilities manager, Fresenius Kabi USA
  6. Ethan Thomas, electrical engineer, Edgecombe Martin Corporation
  7. Ricky Castles, assistant professor, Department of Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, ECU

Charter chapter officers include:

  1. William F. Clukey Jr, secretary and treasurer
  2. Karl Durancik, vice president
  3. David Leake, president

Jim Conrad, IEEE Region 3 director and a UNC-Charlotte professor, officiated the installation. Dr. Jason Yao, associate professor in the College of Engineering and Technology, will be the chapter’s adviser.

The Mu Lambda Chapter of IEEE’s Honor Society, Eta Kappa Nu, was recently installed at ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology. Participating in the ceremonies were (left to right), Dr. Jason Yao (chapter advisor), Dr. David White (college dean), Dr. Hayden Griffin (Dept. of Engineering chair), Jim Conrad (IEEE Region 3 director), Karl Durancik (chapter vice president), David Leake (chapter president) and William Clukey, Jr. (chapter secretary and treasurer). (contributed photo)

The Mu Lambda Chapter of IEEE’s Honor Society, Eta Kappa Nu, was recently installed at ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology. Participating in the ceremonies were (left to right), Dr. Jason Yao (chapter advisor), Dr. David White (college dean), Dr. Hayden Griffin (Dept. of Engineering chair), Jim Conrad (IEEE Region 3 director), Karl Durancik (chapter vice president), David Leake (chapter president) and William Clukey, Jr. (chapter secretary and treasurer). (contributed photo)

According to IEEE’s website, IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu (IEEE-HKN), the honor society of IEEE, is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing individual excellence in education and meritorious work, in professional practice, and in any of the areas within the IEEE-designated fields of interest.

Yao sees the Mu Lambda chapter as a way for its student members, who are juniors and seniors majoring in electrical engineering, to connect and network with professionals who can pass along their insights and experiences.

“These professional individuals will be great resources that students can approach for career-related advice,” said Yao. “It is also our hope that by inducting successful professionals in the electrical engineering-related fields, we create a body of role models for future students.”

Though Mu Lambda’s mission is still being defined, Leake does see the chapter focusing on and promoting industry awareness. He also is thinking about the legacy this chapter will hold for future members.

I hope to see the Mu Lambda chapter become an integral part of the East Carolina University engineering community,” said Leake. “The chapter should promote integrity in engineering, research in current engineering issues, and continuous pursuit of engineering excellence through community involvement and academic endeavors. The Mu Lambda chapter will represent the best up-and-coming engineers at ECU.”

The new chapter does not replace the student chapter of IEEE, which was started in 2013 and whose first president was charter Mu Lambda inductee Thomas. Mu Lambda will serve mainly as the recognition arm of the current student chapter and will assist it with regular activities, guest speakers and competitions.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication

Ed Monroe, longtime health care advocate, dies

Dr. Edwin W. “Ed” Monroe, a physician who went from private practice to helping build the School of Allied Health Sciences and School of Medicine at East Carolina University, died Sunday. He was 90.

Monroe came to Greenville in 1956 to be a “nose-to-the-grindstone internal medicine specialist,” he said in a 2000 interview. His goal was short-lived, as he quickly got involved in East Carolina’s efforts to establish a medical school and other health sciences programs.

Dr. Edwin W. “Ed” Monroe. (contributed photo)

Dr. Edwin W. “Ed” Monroe. (contributed photo)

In 1968, he became founding dean of the School of Allied Health and Social Professions. From that post, he lobbied for a four-year medical school at ECU and helped prepare the academic foundation for it.

In 1974, he became president of the Eastern Area Health Education Center; its conference center is named for him. During that time, he also served as director and then vice chancellor for health affairs at ECU, as associate dean of the School of Medicine from 1979-1986 and executive dean from 1986-1990, when he retired.

“Known for his candor, Dr. Monroe was a fierce advocate for our medical school in its creation and its infancy,” said Dr. Paul Cunningham, who retired as dean of ECU’s medical school last year and served on the faculty in the 1980s. “As a man of principle, he did not shy away from the call for service as a leader. He was motivated by the great potential value of the work. He fervently worked for the improvement of the health of the citizens of the region. Personally, I will miss him as a mentor and a friend.”

As leader of EAHEC, Monroe helped develop outreach programs such as an off-campus bachelor of science in nursing degree as well as community medical residencies, allowing young doctors to experience the demands of a rural practice.

“Conceptually, it was a great vision,” Monroe said in 2000. “Trying to translate that into reality took a degree of stubbornness. It’s always refreshing when others come around to the realization of what we’re trying to do.”

After retiring from ECU, he went to Winston-Salem to reorganize the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust. But he wasn’t done in eastern North Carolina. From 2000-2001, he chaired the boards of what are now Vidant Health and Vidant Medical Center during a time of rapid expansion of the system.

A native of Laurinburg, Monroe received his bachelor’s degree at Davidson College in 1947, attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s two-year School of Medicine from 1947 to 1949 and earned his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania in 1951. He interned at the Medical College of Virginia and was a resident in internal medicine at the then-new N.C. Memorial Hospital at UNC from 1952-1956.

After that, he swore to himself he’d never have anything to do with a new hospital or medical program again. But the call to service was too strong.

“Deep down inside, a doctor has an innate desire to serve and to take care of people,” Monroe said in 2000. “They know they exist only to take care of people. That’s just as true today as 40 or 50 years ago.”

He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Nancy, a granddaughter and two great-grandchildren. Memorials may be made to ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, 525 Moye Blvd., Greenville, N.C. 27834.

 

 

-by Doug Boyd

Special education major receives Bassman Honors Thesis Award

Sarah Bonin, an East Carolina University College of Education student majoring in special education from Cary, has received the 2016-2017 Michael F. Bassman Honors Thesis Award.

Sarah Bonin received a 2016-2017 Thesis Award. (contributed photo)

Sarah Bonin received a 2016-2017 Thesis Award. (contributed photo)

One student is selected each year for the outstanding senior Honors College thesis or project and a $500 award. Bonin created a reading and math curriculum for students in third through fifth grades, and is believed to be the first education student to win the award, said Dr. Guili Zhang, professor and interim chair of the Department of Special Education, Foundations and Research.

“Your personal achievements and accomplishments exemplify the very best of the Honors College and ECU,” said Bryna Coonin, coordinator of the award, in an email announcing Bonin’s selection.

Bonin was nominated by Dr. Melissa Hudson, her senior project mentor, in collaboration with Dr. Linda Patriarca, who has been Bonin’s instructor and internship supervisor this year. Faculty member Debbie Metcalf also provided a support letter.

Bonin will be recognized at the Honors College departmental graduation ceremony on May 3 at Rock Springs Center in Greenville. Bonin will be moving to Durham to begin her career as a kindergarten through fifth grade resource teacher at Glenn Elementary School in the Durham Public Schools system.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity

Annual lecture series focuses on academic writing

A recent lecture series hosted by East Carolina University’s College of Nursing aimed to help nursing faculty members increase their academic writing.

The 9th annual Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 featured presentations by Dr. Kim Skarupski, associate dean for faculty development at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Dr. Paul Silvia, a Lucy Spinks Keker Excellence Professor in the University of North Carolina-Greensboro’s Department of Psychology and the author of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing.

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

In her presentation, Skarupski discussed how faculty members can learn to prioritize writing every day and make it a habit amidst a full schedule of other duties. She recommended writing accountability groups, or WAGs, where participants convene regularly to work on writing and to encourage and hold each other accountable for reaching their goals.

“This is not an option if you’re an academic,” Skarupski said of writing. “You have to do the scholarship portion… The mantra should be, ‘Writing is my job. I do my job every day.’”

She said it’s important for busy faculty members to carve out a small amount of time for writing each day and to remain dedicated to that specific amount of time — no more and no less.

“The whole concept of a WAG is to get people to write more frequently, more regularly, because you’re trying to establish a habit, but for shorter durations,” she said.

Skarupski also suggested expanding the definition of writing to include actions that aren’t necessarily putting words on paper, but that are necessary elements for the writing process. This could include collecting data, copying tables and sending emails requesting information.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

“Once you expand your definition of writing, you’re taking a huge weight off your shoulders,” she said. “Now it’s not just words, words, words. Now it’s all those components,” Skarupski said. “If you expand that definition of writing, now when you have a 10-minute block open because a meeting ended early or a student cancelled on you…smart objectives are being met.”

Silvia, who studies the psychology of creativity and what makes things interesting, also recommended consistency in writing over scheduling large writing “binges.”

“Because time is so self-renewing and self-replenishing until it isn’t, we really take it for granted,” he said. “So we don’t use it as well as we could.”

Silvia used the example of faculty who lose two weeks of potential writing time because they rationalize the decision not to write the week before spring break – because they are “building up to it” – and not to write the week after spring break – because they are “burnt out.”

“So for whole swaths of the semester, people just totally abandon it,” he said. “Today, there might not be four hours, but there’s an hour, and that might be the only hour we have this week. The slow and steady approach is very powerful.”

The Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series began in 2007 through the generosity of ECU faculty members and spouses Dr. Mary Ann Rose, former professor of nursing, and Dr. Walter Pories, professor of surgery and biochemistry. Rose and Pories named the series after Pories’ uncle, a World War II veteran, to honor the nurses who cared for him throughout an extended illness.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

Scholarship celebration honors donors, recipients

The East Carolina University College of Allied Health Sciences celebrated its 65 scholarship recipients and their donors during a recent ceremony at Rock Springs Center.

During the event the college awarded more than $100,000 in merit and need-based scholarships ranging from $500 to $9,000 each.

The College of Allied Health Sciences awarded more than $100,000 in scholarship funds to students at the April 4 Scholarship Celebration at Rock Springs Center. (Contributed photo)

The College of Allied Health Sciences awarded more than $100,000 in scholarship funds to students at the April 4 Scholarship Celebration at Rock Springs Center. (Contributed photo)

 

“These are students who all share a very simple, direct and important life goal: they want to make a difference in the lives of others,” said Dean Robert Orlikoff during the April 4 celebration. “Our mission at ECU is to promote student success, first and foremost. Without student success, we cannot attain success in the other aspects of our mission, and those are community outreach and regional transformation.”

Dr. Phyllis Horns, vice chancellor for health sciences, acknowledged the importance of the scholarships, many of which were established with private funds to honor or memorialize influential allied health educators and professionals and to support the academic pursuits of future professionals in the field.

“There’s nothing we do at this institution more important than to recognize and celebrate our scholarship recipients and recognize and celebrate the generous individuals who make these scholarships possible,” Horns said.

To the students in attendance Horns said, “I know that these scholarships make it possible for you to achieve your ambition and have your dreams come to fruition. We can’t tell you how proud we are of you and how high our expectations are of you when you leave us.”

ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences is the largest college of allied health in North Carolina with more than 1,250 students across nine programs.

For more information, visit ECU’s scholarships website at www.ecu.edu/universityscholarships.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

Joyner Library recognizes prize winners for outstanding student research

Joyner Library announced the winners of its eighth annual Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize for student research during an April 5 ceremony held in the Special Collections Reading Room located on the fourth floor of Joyner Library.

Established by Mrs. Ann Schwarzmann to honor William and Emily Rhem and Theodore and Ann Schwarzmann, the Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize recognizes outstanding research papers written by sophomores, juniors and seniors at East Carolina University.

Eligibility criteria required students to use Joyner Library’s Special Collections, which houses manuscripts, rare books, university archives and the North Carolina collection, as a primary source for their research.

“The papers written by this year’s Rhem/Schwarzmann Prize winners enrich our knowledge of university, community and regional history,” said Joyner Library director Jan Lewis. “Their papers illustrate how primary sources in Joyner Library’s Special Collections can be used to research recent events as well as those occurring more than 150 years ago.”

Caption: Joyner Library director Jan Lewis, second place winner, Zachary Dale, first place winner, Jeanann Woodard, and Arthur Carlson, Joyner’s university archivist pose during an April 5 awards ceremony. (contributed photo)

Caption: Joyner Library director Jan Lewis, second place winner, Zachary Dale, first place winner, Jeanann Woodard, and Arthur Carlson, Joyner’s university archivist pose during an April 5 awards ceremony. (Contributed photo)

Papers could be in any field of study but had to be at least 10 pages or 2,500 words in length, and submitted by Feb. 17.  Entries were judged on originality, quality of research, style, documentation and overall excellence by a panel comprised of faculty members from the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and Joyner Library.

“Through close reading and analysis of primary resource materials, these students improved their critical thinking skills and demonstrated the importance of identifying biases and questioning assumptions,” Lewis noted.

Winning the award for first place — and a $750 prize — was Jeanann Woodard, senior in the Department of History Education in the ECU College of Education, for “Planning and Patronizing: Urban Renewal and Race Relations in Greenville, N.C. in the 1960s.”

“I particularly enjoyed using the special collections because it allowed me to travel back in time and connect with people I may never have a chance to meet,” said Woodard. “While reviewing documents and images, I got the closest thing to a firsthand look at Greenville in the 1960s. The primary sources in the special collection allowed me to better connect to the residents who lost their homes for urban renewal and Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church members, while also exploring the perspective of the city council and the redevelopment commission.”

Two additional award winners were:

  • Zachary Dale, senior in the Department of History Education in the College of Education, in second place — a $500 prize — for “Queer History: LGBT Activism at East Carolina University.”
  • Andrew Turner, junior in the Department of History in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, in third place — a $250 prize — for “The Battle of New Bern: Trial by Fire.”

“Ultimately, the special collections provided me with the evidence needed to construct an argument for the thesis of my research paper,” Woodard continued.

Arthur Carlson, Joyner’s university archivist, said this year’s cycle was the most successful to date as it featured a record number of qualified entries.

“We are especially proud of our winners, who used the unique resources available in special collections to produce research papers that made an original contribution to human knowledge,” he said.

This year’s awards are made possible by the Friends of Joyner Library and the generosity of the late Mrs. Ann Schwarzmann.

For more information about the awards and future participation, contact Arthur Carlson at 328-6838 or CarlsonAr@ecu.edu.

To learn more about manuscripts and rare books, university archives, digital collections, and the North Carolina Collection, please see www.ecu.edu/cs-lib/specialcollections.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communication

1 2 3 167