Category Archives: Events

Summer athletic camps showcase ECU

Hundreds of area school-age children took part in various summer athletic camps at East Carolina University this year. The camps ranged from volleyball to football and all points in-between.

The camps gave the young athletes, from grade school to high school, a chance to interact with ECU coaches and players and learn the Pirate way. They also learned different training techniques and proper form. Some of the kids who took part may one day end up playing for the purple and gold, so getting them on the field, court or diamond is a great way to showcase what ECU has to offer.

 

-by Rich Klindworth, ECU News Services

Serving women who serve: Symposium to address military women’s health

What does a veteran look like?

The only way to know for sure if someone is a veteran is to ask – but people don’t often ask women. This can have significant implications when it comes to health care.

“Once upon a time it was a given that all men served. But having women in the military is not new. Somehow it’s still always a shock when people find out I was in the Army,” Teri Reid said.

Reid spent eight years on active duty and 20 years in the reserves as a nurse in the Army, part of a tradition that dates back to the foundation of the Army Nurse Corps in 1901.

While Reid considers herself fortunate to have not had any major health issues, as a veteran and a health care professional, she knows how important it is for providers to understand their patients’ experiences.

Master Chief Petty Officer Patrice (Pat) Frede, U.S. Navy. Frede works in ECU Human Resources.

Master Chief Petty Officer Patrice (Pat) Frede, U.S. Navy. Frede works in ECU Human Resources. (Contributed photo)

Area health care providers will have a chance to learn more about women service members like Reid at the second annual Military Women’s Health Symposium on Sept. 19. Organized by East Carolina University, Durham VA Medical Center, Eastern Area Health Education Center and other partners, this symposium was started to bring both civilian and military providers together to share emerging knowledge and best practices in treating this population.

There are more than 82,500 women veterans in North Carolina, according to 2017 statistics from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In active duty, women comprise about 15 percent of the armed forces and serve in ever-expanding roles.

Reid attended the first conference in Greenville in 2017 after her friend and former supervisee Chrissy Sanford invited her to come along. Sanford was also in the Army Nurse Corps with 20 years of service. Both Reid and Sanford are pediatric nurse practitioners. Reid served on various bases in the U.S. treating soldiers’ children. Sanford served in various capacities, including deployment to Iraq in 2006-07 where she helped treat Iraqi children among other duties.

“Last year’s conference sounded so applicable to what we experienced and what we thought needed to be discussed,” Sanford said. “I think the conference was very good – so many different topics of discussion and great audience participation. I think it was very beneficial for all the participants. It brought up many issues specific to female veterans.”

This year’s topics include cardiovascular risk, musculoskeletal injuries, sexual trauma, suicide risk and prevention, transgender care and more. Other activities include a panel discussion with military women and trauma-sensitive yoga.

“Women comprise the fastest-growing veteran subpopulation,” said Dr. Keita Franklin, executive director for suicide prevention at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention. Franklin is scheduled to present at the conference.

“Our most recent data tells us that in 2015, the suicide rate for all women veterans was about two times higher compared with non-veteran women, after adjusting for age,” Franklin said. “We know that no one organization alone can prevent suicide. For us to truly prevent veteran suicide, our efforts must reach beyond outside our walls and traditional health care settings to involve peers, family members, organizations, and the community.”

The second annual Military Women’s Health Symposium — organized by East Carolina University, Durham VA Medical Center, Eastern Area Health Education Center and other partners — will be held on Sept. 19.

The second annual Military Women’s Health Symposium — organized by East Carolina University, Durham VA Medical Center, Eastern Area Health Education Center and other partners — will be held on Sept. 19. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

In addition to veterans, the conference will also focus on active duty service members.

“The key is understanding our lifestyle and what we go through, and realizing that everyone has a different experience,” said Lt. Col. Melissa Coleman of the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps at ECU. “For women, not only do we serve when we deploy, we’re also mothers and partners and caregivers – it affects all the other things we do and our loved ones.”

One of the most important things providers can do is ask women about past military service, Reid said, adding, “and don’t be shocked if she says yes.”

Military women’s health care needs can be unique and beyond the familiarity of a civilian provider, so they need to know which services are available to them, Sanford said. “People don’t know what to say other than thank you for your service. We’re honored and proud to serve, but we need more.”

This program is jointly provided by the Office of Continuing Medical Education of the Brody School of Medicine at ECU, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Vidant Health, Duke Area Health Education Center, and the Durham VA Medical Center in association with Eastern Area Health Education Center.

To find out more or register for the conference, visit https://www.easternahec.net/courses-and-events/55921/2018-military-womens-health-symposium.

Call for Health Stories from Military Women

Are you a woman who serves or has served in the military? Are you willing to share how your service has impacted your health? We want to hear from you! Eastern Area Health Education Center is collecting health stories and images from active duty and veteran women of eastern North Carolina. These stories and images will be compiled into posters to be displayed at the upcoming Military Women’s Health Symposium for health care providers on Sept. 19. These posters will also become a public traveling exhibit for area hospitals and campuses. The goal of this symposium is to advance care for women who serve and increase both civilian and military provider awareness of the issues military women face. Your stories will help local providers and the public better understand the unique health needs of military women.

Submissions will be collected through Aug. 17. Stories should be limited to 250 words and must be health-related. Not all submissions may be used and some may be edited for clarity. Images are optional but encouraged. Submissions may be anonymous. Email submissions to Jackie Drake at drakej@ecu.edu or call 252-744-5217.

 

-by Jackie Drake, University Communications

Wanted: Fall move-in volunteers

Campus Living is seeking groups and organizations to serve as volunteers for this coming fall’s move-in from Wednesday, Aug. 15 through Friday, Aug. 17.

Move-in volunteers welcome residents and their families to campus while assisting them with carrying boxes, answering questions and providing directions. Additional volunteers assist with the check-in process at Minges Coliseum.

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Any size group can be accommodated, and individuals also are welcome to volunteer.

If your department, organization or group is interested in participating or would like more information, please arrange for a representative to contact Dave Hilbert in Campus Living at hilbertd17@ecu.edu or 737-1063.

ECU summer festivals for piano and guitar bring international artists to Greenville for public performances

The inaugural East Carolina Piano Festival and the long-standing ECU Summer International Guitar Festival will bring acclaimed international performers to Greenville for public concerts in June and July.

The East Carolina Piano Festival begins June 23. This is the first year of the piano festival. The ECU Summer International Guitar Festival begins June 30. This is the guitar festival’s 23rd year.

Peter Frankl (Contributed photo)

Peter Frankl (Contributed photo)

The piano festival welcomes legendary Hungarian pianist Peter Frankl to join ECU faculty artists in performance of works by Schubert, Debussy, Schumann and Brahms on June 26. Andrew Tyson, winner of the Avery Fisher Career Grant and numerous international piano competitions, will perform works by Couperin, Chopin, Ravel and Berg on June 24. Multiple additional concerts during the festival feature festival faculty, guests and participants. Contact 252-328-5184 for more information.

Grammy-winner Jason Vieaux, described by NPR as “perhaps the most precise and soulful classical guitarist of his generation,” headlines the guitar festival. Additional concerts feature French virtuoso Judicaël Perroy, Canadian Jeffrey McFadden, American guitarist Andrew Zohn, 2004 ECU solo guitar competition first prize winner Isaac Bustos, 2018 solo competition winner Samuel Hines, Mary Akerman and guitar festival director Elliot Frank. Contact 252-328-6245 for more information.

All concerts are at East Carolina University School of Music, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.

Piano festival guest artist and faculty concerts are ticketed. All guitar festival concerts are ticketed. For ticket information, visit www.ecuarts.com or call 252-328-4788.

 

East Carolina Piano FestivalFestival Opening Concert Saturday, June 23, 7:30 p.m.  Featuring guest and faculty artists Benjamin Hochman, Yukiko Sekino, Keiko Sekino, Kwan Yi and John O’Brien. Works for piano solo, four-hands, six-hands, and two pianos eight-hands by Mozart, Bizet, Ravel, Scriabin and others. (Ticketed)  Piano recital by Andrew Tyson Sunday, June 24, 3 p.m.  Works by Couperin, Chopin, Ravel and Berg. (Ticketed)  An Evening of Chamber Music: Pianist Peter Frankl and Friends Tuesday, June 26, 7:30 p.m.  Pianist Peter Frankl joined by ECU faculty artists Ara Gregorian and Hye-Jin Kim, violin, and Keiko Sekino and Kwan Yi, piano. Works by Schubert, Debussy, Schumann and Brahms. (Ticketed)  Young Artist Program Final Concert I Thursday, June 28, 9 a.m.  Featuring 20 young pianists from across the United States. (Free)  Young Artist Program Final Concert II Thursday, June 28, 3 p.m.  Featuring 20 young pianists from across the United States. (Free)  Young Artist Program Final Concert III Thursday, June 28, 5 p.m.  Featuring 20 young pianists from across the United States. (Free)

 

ECU Summer International Guitar Festival

Samuel Hines Saturday, June 30, 4 p.m.  Elliot Frank/Judicael Perroy Saturday, June 30, 7:30 p.m.  Mary Akerman Sunday, July 1, 4 p.m.  Andrew Zohn/Jason Vieaux Sunday, July 1, 7:30 p.m.  Solo Competition Semifinals Monday, July 2, 4 p.m.  Isaac Bustos/Jeffrey McFadden Monday, July 2, 7:30 p.m.  Youth and College Competition Finals/Awards Tuesday, July 3, 4 p.m.

 

-For ticket information, visit www.ecuarts.com or call 252-328-4788.

ECU takes third in NASA rover challenge

Five College of Engineering and Technology students recently competed and won third place in the 2018 Human Exploration Rover Challenge. The April event, which was held in Huntsville, Alabama, was sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center and U.S. Space & Rocket Center.

According to a NASA news release, the competition challenged high school and college teams to design, build and test human-powered roving vehicles inspired by the Apollo lunar missions and future exploration missions to the moon, Mars and beyond. This year’s competition challenged teams to complete 14 obstacles and five tasks throughout a half-mile course, with a six-minute supply of “virtual” oxygen.

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

ECU competed against 64 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

ECU competed against 63 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

The obstacles simulated the terrain found throughout the solar system, and the tasks challenged teams to collect and return samples, take photographs and plant a flag. Teams had to decide which tasks and obstacles to attempt or bypass before their clock expired.

ECU’s team competed against 63 other universities and colleges. They were the only team to complete the entire obstacle course. The team included juniors Evan Diener, Andrew Grena, Tanner Guin, Jameson Morris and Morgan Watkins. Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam served as the faculty advisor.

“The goal was for these students to take what they learned and apply it to future competitions,” said Abdel-Salam.

Students in the team are members of the college’s American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The team’s participation in the competition was made possible by the North Carolina Space Grant.

This year marked the second time an ECU team participated in the event.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Eastern AHEC, ECU and Camp Lejeune partner on new military-civilian cardiac conference

More than 250 military and civilian health professionals came together for a new educational conference entitled Premature Cardiac Death in Eastern North Carolina on May 8 at Camp Lejeune.

Held at Camp Lejeune, the first Premature Cardiac Death in Eastern North Carolina conference brought together more than 250 military and civilian health professionals. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

Held at Camp Lejeune, the first Premature Cardiac Death in Eastern North Carolina conference brought together more than 250 military and civilian health professionals. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

This collaboration allowed physicians, nurses, first responders and others to share and discuss best practices for prevention, intervention and emergency response for cardiac events and cardiovascular disease. The conference was jointly provided by Eastern Area Health Education Center Department of Nursing and Allied Health Education, the Office of Continuing Medical Education and the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences of the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, in partnership with Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune.

Dr. D. Lynn Morris, chief of interventional cardiology at the East Carolina Heart Institute and professor of cardiovascular sciences at the Brody School of Medicine, spoke at the conference at Camp Lejeune.

Dr. D. Lynn Morris, chief of interventional cardiology at the East Carolina Heart Institute and professor of cardiovascular sciences at the Brody School of Medicine, spoke at the conference at Camp Lejeune.

The program was a success, according to Dr. Mary Wilson, assistant director for nursing education at Eastern AHEC. “Participants were able to gain a deeper understanding of the various types of cardiovascular disease that impact many in our region, current treatment guidelines and research findings,” Wilson said. “Overall, the conference provided an opportunity to learn about the unique health care needs of eastern North Carolina and facilitate joint efforts to coordinate patient care for both military and civilian populations.”

More than 18,000 people in North Carolina died from heart disease in 2016, according to the State Center for Health Statistics. A number of counties in the east, such as Lenoir and Jones, have cardiovascular disease death rates above that of the state. This issue also affects military personnel.

“Events like this allow us to learn from one another,” said Capt. James Hancock, commanding officer of Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune, during opening remarks. “We each bring something unique, different capabilities to the table, and today we have an opportunity to share those talents and education. The future of health care in eastern North Carolina depends on us working side-by-side.”

Mildred Carraway, director of continuing medical, pharmacy and dental education at Eastern AHEC, shakes hands with Capt. James Hancock, commanding officer of Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune.

Mildred Carraway, director of continuing medical, pharmacy and dental education at Eastern AHEC, shakes hands with Capt. James Hancock, commanding officer of Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune.

“I was really excited about collaborating with the military health care system,” said Dr. J. Paul Mounsey, chief of electrophysiology at the East Carolina Heart Institute. “I enjoyed interacting with the military physicians. We got a lot of positive feedback and the participants asked great questions. There was a good exchange of ideas. There is huge potential for the future in our goal of improving health care in eastern North Carolina.”

Upcoming continuing education and professional development events from Eastern AHEC include a Military Women’s Health Symposium on Sept. 19 and a Cardiovascular Symposium on Dec. 6. For more information, visit www.easternahec.net.

 

-by Jackie Drake, Eastern AHEC

Blockfest competition gives construction students real-life experience

Blockfest, a structure building competition made possible by Oldcastle Adams, recently came to ECU, where 42 construction students participated in the daylong event.

Blockfest, a structure building competition made possible by Oldcastle Adams, recently came to ECU, where 42 construction students participated in the daylong event. (Contributed photos)

Construction management students recently competed in Blockfest, a design and craft competition in which seven teams of 42 students had to dry-stack a structure using a selection of concrete masonry units (CMU) that were provided by Oldcastle Adams products of Goldsboro.

Before competition day, the teams created an 11-by-17 presentation board that showed the plans and elevations of their proposed structures. On the day of the competition, teams had two hours to build the structures, which had to be approximately 48 inches tall and not exceed a maximum site size of 6-by-6.

Once the students completed construction of the structures, which ranged from benches to grills to firepits, industry judges reviewed the structures. The winning structure was built by Cailey Hastings (team leader), Adam Ghanayem and Andrew Dickerson.

The student team that built the winning structure included Andrew Dickerson, standing and front row, left to right, Adam Ghanayem and Cailey Hastings.

The student team that built the winning structure included Andrew Dickerson, standing and front row, left to right, Adam Ghanayem and Cailey Hastings.

Brett Hardy, vice president of sales for Oldcastle Adams, serves on the advisory board for the College of Engineering and Technology’s Department of Construction Management. He says the competition allows the students to learn more about the CMUs they’ll encounter once in the real world.

“This is the future of our industry (the students),” said Hardy. “I think it’s important for them to understand the different material types.”

Construction sophomore Nathaniel Matthewson levels sand for the base for a structure built during Blockfest.

Construction sophomore Nathanial Mathewson levels sand that served as the base for a structure built during Blockfest.

“It’s like a live lab for them to get hands-on experience,” said Dr. Amin Akhnoukh, assistant professor in construction management.

Akhnoukh said the competition is much more than building the structure. Each team had to not only supply the drawings, but also had to coordinate the purchasing and delivery of materials.

This year’s Blockfest was the third time the event has been held at ECU.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Honor a service member with a Memorial Walk commemorative brick

Anthony Britt, Associate Director for Administration & Summer School at ECU, honored three members of his family by placing bricks engraved with their names at the Memorial Walk at Christenbury Gym during a Veteran's Day ceremony in November. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Anthony Britt, Associate Director for Administration & Summer School at ECU, honored three members of his family by placing bricks engraved with their names at the Memorial Walk at Christenbury Gym during a Veteran’s Day ceremony in November. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

Each November, the Office of Military Programs conducts a ceremony to honor those whose engraved brick pavers will become part of the Memorial Walk located west of Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium.

The project, by the College of Health and Human Performance and the Office of Military Programs, also raises funds for ROTC Army and Air Force Scholarships.

The decorative brick pavers, engraved with a selected name or phrase, can be purchased in honor of any living or deceased veteran or active duty service member, as well as anyone who has done something in support of our national defense, including helping with programs with the VA, Support The Troops, Wounded Warrior Project and similar activities.

East Carolina University’s faculty, staff, students and friends are able to purchase the commemorative bricks for family members or those who have served in the military. The cost is $125 – $25 buys the paver and pays for the engraving, and $100 goes for ROTC scholarships. The $100 of the cost is tax-deductible.

The November ceremony includes a segment where the family, friend and/or service member can lay the paver as part of the program. During this time, each name is read and the Victory Bell is struck to represent the service and sacrifice of the one honored.

The dedication for this year will be 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2. Paver orders will be accepted for this year’s ceremony until Sept. 7.

For more information and to access the order form, visit https://hhp.ecu.edu/2018/05/09/honor-a-service-member/.

The engraved bricks become part of the Memorial Walk outside of Christenbury Gym.

The engraved bricks become part of the Memorial Walk outside of Christenbury Gym.

Family Fun Day set for June 3

Campus Recreation & Wellness will be hosting Family Fun Day on Sunday, June 3 from 2– 4 p.m. at the North Recreational Complex on U.S. 264 East to celebrate our members and families.

The ECU campus community is invited for an afternoon of inflatable water slides, kid-friendly games, a dance party on the beach and a fitness walk. You will be able to paddle in a kayak, a canoe or a stand-up paddle board across the lake. CRW 2018 summer campers get a chance to meet the new counselors for this upcoming season.

Light refreshments will be served. Water activities are available so please come prepared to get wet.

You must register for this event prior to June 1 at crwregistration.ecu.edu. Please log in with your ECU PirateID and add any dependents to your account that wish to attend. Then you will choose the icon for Special Events.

North Recreational Complex address:

Campus Recreation & Wellness

3764 U.S. 264 East

Greenville, NC 27843

*NRC is located on U.S. 264 next to North Campus Crossing.

 

For more information contact Jenny Gregory at gregoryj@ecu.edu 

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