Category Archives: Faculty

Mathematical sculpture workshop spotlights the math behind art

Applied mathematician and sculptor Dr. George Hart led an April 7 workshop in Jenkins Fine Arts Center at East Carolina University which spotlighted the math behind art.

Hart, an interdepartmental research professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, demonstrated how mathematics is creative in unexpected ways.

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Twenty-seven students, faculty and staff from across campus as well as teachers from the greater Greenville community assembled two of Hart’s sculptures and designed two of their own.

The event was organized by Dr. Sviatoslav Archava, teaching associate professor of mathematics at ECU.

Workshop participants started by connecting plastic struts and connector balls from a Zometool kit, forming shapes that would prove to be foundational for the sculptures that they would create.

The sculpture “Autumn.” (photos by Cliff Hollis)

The sculpture “Autumn.”
(photos by Cliff Hollis)

The first sculpture, named “Autumn”, was assembled from 60 identical laser-cut wood pieces that were connected using cable ties. Working together, the participants explored the possible ways to connect the pieces, a task that developed spatial perception and visual reasoning. The solution for the sculpture involved two phases. The first phase was a finding a solution to connect three pieces. After that, it was possible to build the sculpture by combining the trio of connected pieces to other trios. Only one way to connect the pieces led to a beautiful structure they were trying to assemble. The following facts about the sculpture were noted by the participants with Hart’s help:

  • “Autumn” may be viewed as an artistic version of a regular dodecahedron, a solid that is formed by 12 regular pentagons.
  • Sixty pieces from which the sculpture is built lie in 30 planes (two in each plane). The 30 planes are the facial planes of the five cubes inscribed in the dodecahedron or, equivalently, of the rhombic tricontahedron.

 

The "Ambagesque" sculpture.

The “Ambagesque” sculpture.

The second sculpture, named “Ambagesque” (from the Latin word for “tangle”), also had 60 pieces, which were laser-cut from colored acrylic sheets. The pieces lie in 20 different planes (three in each plane). Despite the smaller number of planes involved, it was much more difficult to assemble due to the non- edge-to-edge connections and more complicated geometry. On a few occasions, participants needed Hart’s help to find the correct way to proceed.

Assembling the sculptures gave the participants a sense of the mental processes that mathematicians use in their research and the excitement and pleasure of “figuring things out.”

At the end of the workshop, participants designed their own paper sculpture. This involved changing the faces of the rhombic tricontahedron so the altered faces could be glued back together to create a visually appealing form.

Participants went away with an idea of the underlying shapes, the curiosity to look for patterns in complex-looking sculptures they may see elsewhere or design themselves, and having experienced the thrill of exploring the world around them mathematically.

For more information on Hart and his work, visit http://georgehart.com/.

 

 

-by Dr. Slava Archava, Teaching Associate Professor of Mathematics

 

IEEE Installs New Honors Chapter at ECU

The College of Engineering and Technology recently witnessed history. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)-Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) Mu Lambda Chapter was recently installed at the college. The new chapter, as part of its ceremonies, also inducted three area professionals and seven engineering students as its charter members.

The IEEE HKN Mu Lambda Chapter charter members include:

  1. Bryan Barrera, senior
  2. Davis Harrison, junior
  3. Dean Lamonica, senior
  4. Michael David Soule, senior
  5. Keith Hill, engineering & facilities manager, Fresenius Kabi USA
  6. Ethan Thomas, electrical engineer, Edgecombe Martin Corporation
  7. Ricky Castles, assistant professor, Department of Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, ECU

Charter chapter officers include:

  1. William F. Clukey Jr, secretary and treasurer
  2. Karl Durancik, vice president
  3. David Leake, president

Jim Conrad, IEEE Region 3 director and a UNC-Charlotte professor, officiated the installation. Dr. Jason Yao, associate professor in the College of Engineering and Technology, will be the chapter’s adviser.

The Mu Lambda Chapter of IEEE’s Honor Society, Eta Kappa Nu, was recently installed at ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology. Participating in the ceremonies were (left to right), Dr. Jason Yao (chapter advisor), Dr. David White (college dean), Dr. Hayden Griffin (Dept. of Engineering chair), Jim Conrad (IEEE Region 3 director), Karl Durancik (chapter vice president), David Leake (chapter president) and William Clukey, Jr. (chapter secretary and treasurer). (contributed photo)

The Mu Lambda Chapter of IEEE’s Honor Society, Eta Kappa Nu, was recently installed at ECU’s College of Engineering and Technology. Participating in the ceremonies were (left to right), Dr. Jason Yao (chapter advisor), Dr. David White (college dean), Dr. Hayden Griffin (Dept. of Engineering chair), Jim Conrad (IEEE Region 3 director), Karl Durancik (chapter vice president), David Leake (chapter president) and William Clukey, Jr. (chapter secretary and treasurer). (contributed photo)

According to IEEE’s website, IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu (IEEE-HKN), the honor society of IEEE, is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing individual excellence in education and meritorious work, in professional practice, and in any of the areas within the IEEE-designated fields of interest.

Yao sees the Mu Lambda chapter as a way for its student members, who are juniors and seniors majoring in electrical engineering, to connect and network with professionals who can pass along their insights and experiences.

“These professional individuals will be great resources that students can approach for career-related advice,” said Yao. “It is also our hope that by inducting successful professionals in the electrical engineering-related fields, we create a body of role models for future students.”

Though Mu Lambda’s mission is still being defined, Leake does see the chapter focusing on and promoting industry awareness. He also is thinking about the legacy this chapter will hold for future members.

I hope to see the Mu Lambda chapter become an integral part of the East Carolina University engineering community,” said Leake. “The chapter should promote integrity in engineering, research in current engineering issues, and continuous pursuit of engineering excellence through community involvement and academic endeavors. The Mu Lambda chapter will represent the best up-and-coming engineers at ECU.”

The new chapter does not replace the student chapter of IEEE, which was started in 2013 and whose first president was charter Mu Lambda inductee Thomas. Mu Lambda will serve mainly as the recognition arm of the current student chapter and will assist it with regular activities, guest speakers and competitions.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communication

Annual lecture series focuses on academic writing

A recent lecture series hosted by East Carolina University’s College of Nursing aimed to help nursing faculty members increase their academic writing.

The 9th annual Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 featured presentations by Dr. Kim Skarupski, associate dean for faculty development at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Dr. Paul Silvia, a Lucy Spinks Keker Excellence Professor in the University of North Carolina-Greensboro’s Department of Psychology and the author of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing.

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

Dr. Kim Skarupski discusses how faculty members can dedicate more time to writing during the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series on April 6 at Eastern Area Health Education Center. (Photos by Conley Evans)

In her presentation, Skarupski discussed how faculty members can learn to prioritize writing every day and make it a habit amidst a full schedule of other duties. She recommended writing accountability groups, or WAGs, where participants convene regularly to work on writing and to encourage and hold each other accountable for reaching their goals.

“This is not an option if you’re an academic,” Skarupski said of writing. “You have to do the scholarship portion… The mantra should be, ‘Writing is my job. I do my job every day.’”

She said it’s important for busy faculty members to carve out a small amount of time for writing each day and to remain dedicated to that specific amount of time — no more and no less.

“The whole concept of a WAG is to get people to write more frequently, more regularly, because you’re trying to establish a habit, but for shorter durations,” she said.

Skarupski also suggested expanding the definition of writing to include actions that aren’t necessarily putting words on paper, but that are necessary elements for the writing process. This could include collecting data, copying tables and sending emails requesting information.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

Copies of How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing, written by visiting scholar Dr. Paul Silvia, were distributed to participants of the Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series.

“Once you expand your definition of writing, you’re taking a huge weight off your shoulders,” she said. “Now it’s not just words, words, words. Now it’s all those components,” Skarupski said. “If you expand that definition of writing, now when you have a 10-minute block open because a meeting ended early or a student cancelled on you…smart objectives are being met.”

Silvia, who studies the psychology of creativity and what makes things interesting, also recommended consistency in writing over scheduling large writing “binges.”

“Because time is so self-renewing and self-replenishing until it isn’t, we really take it for granted,” he said. “So we don’t use it as well as we could.”

Silvia used the example of faculty who lose two weeks of potential writing time because they rationalize the decision not to write the week before spring break – because they are “building up to it” – and not to write the week after spring break – because they are “burnt out.”

“So for whole swaths of the semester, people just totally abandon it,” he said. “Today, there might not be four hours, but there’s an hour, and that might be the only hour we have this week. The slow and steady approach is very powerful.”

The Siegfried Lowin Visiting Scholar Lecture Series began in 2007 through the generosity of ECU faculty members and spouses Dr. Mary Ann Rose, professor of nursing, and Dr. Walter Pories, professor of surgery and biochemistry. Rose and Pories named the series after Pories’ uncle, a World War II veteran, to honor the nurses who cared for him throughout an extended illness.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

ECU professor to participate in Lost Colony panel

East Carolina University’s Dr. Charlie Ewen, professor of anthropology, will participate in a panel discussion titled “Digging for Answers: The Continued Search for the Missing Colonists of Roanoke Island” at Roanoke Island Festival Park on Saturday, April 8, at 1 p.m.

Dr. Charlie Ewen. (contributed photo)

Dr. Charlie Ewen (contributed photo)

The event will be moderated by author Andrew Lawler, who has written about archaeology for National Geographic, Smithsonian, Science, Discover and other publications. Lawler will discuss his recent reporting on excavations related to the Roanoke voyages.

He will moderate a panel of experts that includes Ewen as well as Dr. Mark Horton of the University of Bristol, who heads the Cape Creek dig on Hatteras Island, and Dr. Guy Prentice of the National Park Service Southeast Archeological Center, who oversees excavations at Fort Raleigh. Ewen is co-editor of “Searching for the Roanoke Colonists.”

Artifacts from some of the digs will be on display. The event is sponsored by the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources in partnership with ECU. Tickets for the event are $5. Call 252-475-1500 or visit www.roanokeisland.com for more information.

 

-by Jules Norwood

ECU obstetrics/gynecology professor completes national educators program

A clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University has graduated from a prestigious national program designed to create expert educators in her field.

Dr. Jill Sutton has completed the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Academic Scholars and Leaders Program, a 15-month course in curriculum design, educational theory, adult learning methodologies and teaching strategies. Sutton was one of only 24 professors nationwide admitted to the program last year. It was first offered in 1997.

 

Dr. Jill Sutton. (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

Dr. Jill Sutton. (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

“Dr. Sutton brought Pirate Pride to our university and department from a national stage,” said Dr. Libby Baxley, senior associate dean for academic affairs. “We are fortunate indeed to have her as a resource and educator.”

Sutton has already put to use the skills gained in the Scholars and Leaders Program. In March, she presented a research poster at the annual joint meeting of the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Sutton, who also serves as clerkship director for third-year medical students at Brody, investigated forms of feedback in educational simulation sessions. She found that medical students prefer to receive feedback directly rather than electronically.

“I am grateful to have participated in this program,” she said. “I learned much about educational research and have been able to support several students in their own research projects with these new tools.”

Sutton completed her medical degree and residency training at the Brody School of Medicine and joined the faculty in 2010. She is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology. In 2016, she received the Katherine Bray-Strickland Young Alumni Award for her dedication to medical student education and to the mission of the Brody School of Medicine.

 

 

-by Elizabeth Willy, University Communication 

Ron Clark to speak at 3rd annual Corporate and Leadership Awards

East Carolina University alumnus Ron Clark, ’94, will be the featured speaker for the third annual Corporate and Leadership Awards banquet hosted by the ECU Division of Student Affairs at 6 p.m. April 22 at the Greenville Hilton.

Clark, a New York Times bestselling author, the subject of the movie, “The Ron Clark Story,” and Disney’s American Teacher of the Year, started working with students in Aurora before teaching in New York City and then founding the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta, Georgia. In addition to educating fifth- to eighth-grade students, the internationally acclaimed school serves as a professional development site for teachers. To date, more than 40,000 educators have visited the Ron Clark Academy to be trained by Clark and his award-winning staff.

ECU alumnus Ron Clark, ’94. (contributed photo)

ECU alumnus Ron Clark, ’94. (contributed photo)

The recipients of the 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards will be recognized at the banquet. These alumni under the age of 40 have excelled after graduating from ECU and are now using their experience to make an impact in their respective professions, local communities and the world.

This year’s honorees represent 11 different states and one award winner will travel from Ontario, Canada to attend. Many are North Carolina residents with the remaining living across the country – from California to New York and Florida.

Awards also will be presented to corporate partners who have made positive impacts for ECU and its students, as well as individuals who serve as advocates for student affairs.

For tickets or information, call Zack Hawkins in student affairs at 252-737-4970 or email hawkinsz@ecu.edu.

 

2017 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards Honorees

Arts & Humanities

Trevor James Avery – Jacksonville

Tyler A. Griffin – Miami, Florida

Jennifer Parks Rezeli – Greenville

Augustus D. Willis IV – Raleigh

Jeremy Woodard – New York, New York

 

Business

Rasheca Barrow – Houston, Texas

Dr. Charlie Brown – Washington

Cristen A. Jones – Charleston, South Carolina

Justin Lucas – Chicago, Illinois

Victor R. Moore Jr. – Greenville

Bradley Pearce – Davidson

Scott Poag – Augusta, Georgia

Jamie Lynn Sigler – San Diego, California

Heather Waters – Greenville

 

Health & Wellness

Steven Carmichael – Charlotte

Dr. Abiola Fajobi – Ontario, Canada

Lex Gillette – Chula Vista, California

Dr. Glenn Harvin – Greenville

Natasha C. Holley – Ahoskie

Dr. Shondell Jones – Winterville

Dr. Shannon Baker Powell – Grimesland

Dr. Jessica Tomalusa – Wake Forest

 

Public Service

Melissa Adamson – Greenville

Honorable April M. Smith – Fayetteville

Captain Christine Guthrie – Melbourne, Florida

Major Derri G. Stormer – Winston-Salem

Brock Letchworth – Greenville

Mindy Ann Walker – Raleigh

Aleshia Hunt – Greenville

Mona Lesane Townes – Knightdale

Captain Sheontee Frank – Summerville, South Carolina

 

Research & Education

April Paul Baer – Frostburg, Maryland

Dr. Carenado Davis – Winterville

Dr. Jasmine Graham – Indianapolis, Indiana

Gregory Hedgepeth – Boca Raton, Florida

Angela McCall Hill – Coats

Leshaun T. Jenkins – Tarboro

Dr. Steve M. Lassiter, Jr. – Greenville

Dr. Keeley J. Pratt – Columbus, Ohio

Recardo Tucker – Atlanta, Georgia

 

 

-by Jules Norwood

Group names ECU graduate national teacher of the year in adapted physical education

Lara Brockhouse. (contributed photo)

Lara Brickhouse. (contributed photo)

Lara Brickhouse ’05,’13 has been named the 2017 national teacher of the year in adapted physical education by the Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE America).

Brickhouse teaches in the Durham Public Schools in nine schools: Little River School, E.K. Powe, Hope Valley, Bethesda and Eno Valley elementary schools; Lucas and Lowe’s Grove middle schools; and Northern and Riverside high schools.

She earned her bachelor’s in physical education in 2005 and her master’s in physical education in 2013.

Brickhouse was featured recently on an area TV station: http://www.wral.com/durham-pe-teacher-wins-national-award-for-work-with-special-needs-students/16602394/

Brickhouse was one of six honored by SHAPE America. The other national award recipients represent dance education, school health and physical education professions.

The winners were selected after nationwide state and district competitions and announced during the organization’s Hall of Fame Banquet and National Convention and Expo held in Boston March 14-18. The awards are given in recognition of outstanding teaching performance and the ability to motivate today’s youth to participate in a lifetime of physical activity.

For more information, visit www.shapeamerica.org.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity 

Student Health Prepares for National Accreditation

 LaNika Wright, SHS Director, is presenting her game called “The Government” to Dr. Armen, SHS Medical Director. (contributed photos)

LaNika Wright, SHS Director, is presenting her game called “The Government” to Dr. Armen, SHS Medical Director. (contributed photos)

ECU Student Health Services hosted an Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, AAAHC, fair on March 7, 2017 for all SHS employees. The fair was a fun, creative way to help prepare employees for the upcoming AAAHC survey on June 5th and 6th, 2017. Additionally, the fair included interactive games on several AAAHC chapters such as patient rights, quality of care and quality improvement. All participants who successfully completed all the games had the opportunity to put their name in for a drawing to win homemade baked goods, gift card, and ECU ball cap! SHS staff gave positive feedback on the fair and noted it was a, “fun atmosphere with interactive learning.”

LaShae Locke created and ran her game named “RESPECT,” which helped inform players on AAAHC standards of respecting patient rights.

LaShae Locke created and ran her game named “RESPECT,” which helped inform players on AAAHC standards of respecting patient rights.

AAAHC is a private, non-profit organization formed in 1979. Their primary purpose is to develop standards to advance and promote patient safety, quality care, and value for ambulatory health care through peer-based accreditation process, education and research. The AAAHC Accreditation is a voluntary process which involves an onsite visit for surveyors to measure health care organizations’ quality of services and performance against nationally recognized standards.

In addition to the fair, SHS preparation for AAAHC accreditation is an ongoing process. Other preparation efforts include mock inspections, education sessions, self-assessment of AAAHC standards, and monthly chapter captain meetings. SHS was re-accredited by AAAHC in 2014 and our accreditation certification demonstrates our commitment to provide the highest level of quality of care to our students. Below are some scenes from the AAAHC Fair.

Kim Joyner used her “Swashbuckling with Captain Kim” game to inform providers and staff about the AAAHC standards on quality improvement and risk management.

Kim Joyner used her “Swashbuckling with Captain Kim” game to inform providers and staff about the AAAHC standards on quality improvement and risk management.

 

 

-by Kim Joyner, Student Health Services

Living the motto: Faculty, staff and students recognized for service

East Carolina University honored faculty, staff and students for living the university’s motto – Servire, to serve – during an event March 22 as part of Chancellor Cecil Staton’s installation week.

More than 100 members of the university community were honored at Harvey Hall; afterwards many of the group walked over to Clark-LeClair Baseball Stadium to see the Pirates take on the UNC-Chapel Hill Tar Heels.

“The honorees tonight represent the very best of our university. They are talented and engaged and committed to transforming our community, North Carolina and the world,” said Staton in his welcome to honorees and guests. “Service is among the hallmark characteristics of this university, and one that sets us apart.”

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton.
(Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Staton presented the first award of the event, the James R. Talton Leadership Award, to Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance.

The award for servant leadership is in honor of the outstanding life and work of James R. Talton Jr., a former chair of the ECU Board of Trustees and a lifelong Pirate.

A nomination letter said of Gilbert: “His philosophy of leadership helps every person feel as though his or her voice is important and his or her contributions are essential to the success of the team. Dean Gilbert is committed to many great initiatives throughout eastern North Carolina, but perhaps most impressive is his unwavering support for our country’s servicemen and women.”

Also recognized were recipients of diversity and inclusion awards, presented by the Office of Equity and Diversity. Recipients, who can be faculty, staff, students or teams, are engaged in meaningful diversity and inclusion activities in addition to or extending beyond their primary responsibility at the university.

Honored were faculty member Dr. Nicole Caswell, the director of the University Writing Center and assistant professor in the Department of English; staff member Mark Rasdorf, associate director for the LGBT Resource Office in Intercultural Affairs; senior art major Janae Brown; and the Department of Sociology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Service Fellows Internship program were recognized by Jama Dagenhart, executive director of the State Employees Credit Union Foundation.

The internships are a component of the larger Public Service Fellows program, led by Dr. Sharon Paynter, assistant vice chancellor for public service and community relations.

Recognized were Eva Gallardo, Lauren Barkand, Toni Abernathy, Ashley Cromie, Lucas Merriam, James Kidd, Damiere Powell, Alexis Everette, Lee Hodges, Andrew Strong, Taylor Nelson, Stephanie Minor, Hope Stuart, Connor Hoffman, Matthew Barrier, Andrew DiMeglio and Nelson Martinez-Borja.

 The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The annual Centennial Awards for Excellence recognize contributors in each of the following four areas: Ambition, Leadership, Service and Spirit.
The recipients represent one staff member, one faculty member, and one other contributor —a member of the administration or an administrative team, a second staff member or a staff team, or a second faculty member or faculty team. Winners are selected from peer nominations and selection by the Centennial Awards for Excellence Selection Committee.
The team honored for ambition was the North Carolina Literary Review Staff: Margaret Bauer, Diane Rodman, Liza Wieland, Christy Hallberg and Randall Martoccia for innovation and commitment to “showcase the best … authors and scholars.”

Dr. Wendy Sharer was the faculty honoree in leadership for her transformative work leading ECU’s Quality Enhancement Plan, establishing the University Writing Center, founding a sophomore-level writing course and coordinating writing liaisons from disciplines across the university.

The staff honoree in leadership was John Gill, campus landscape architect, for his leadership in education and research, and leadership to the university and regional community in improving environmental quality.

The honoree in leadership for the “other” category was Ernest Marshburn for many years of institutional and public service with the Office of Research Development and as a volunteer in recreational boating safety.

Dr. Mary Jackson was the faculty honoree in the service category for her service in helping those who suffer from substance use disorders by enhancing the training program at ECU and working with military personnel who are trying to overcome their own addictions.

The Tedi Bear Child Advocacy Team was the team honoree for their service in providing a nationally recognized child advocacy center. The team members are Julie Gill, Ann Parsons, Cassandra Hawkins, Latoya Mobley, Katie Wood, Lauren Miller, Rebecca Yoder, Wendy Shouse, Mary Curry, Andora Hankerson, Melanie Meeks, Kelly Baxter, Kia Glosson, Lacy Hobgood, Coral Steffey and Matthew Ledoux.

This year’s staff recipient was Lori Lee for her undaunted commitment to ECU, her steadfast support for Faculty Senate, its officers and committees, and unparalleled dedication to ECU’s system of shared governance.

Employee Steven Asby was the final spirit award honoree in the “other” category for his unwavering support of the Pirate Nation, his volunteer work with student-athletes, and his commitment to first-generation students.
The Servire Society recognized 22 first-time inductees, 12 members were recognized for two to four years and 20 were honored for five to eight years of membership.

Each Servire Society member has contributed 100 or more hours of volunteer service – without compensation and outside his or her normal realm of duties – to the community at large within the previous year.

 The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The following members of the ECU community were recognized Austin Allen, Crissa Allen, Mona Amin, Terah Archie, David Batie, Sheresa Blanchard, Craig Brown, Nicole Caswell, Lisa Compton, Sahil Dayal, Daniel Dickerson, Denise Donica, Lori Earls, Sylvia Escott Stump, Tina Mickey, Nicole Fox, Amy Frank, Sylvia Fuller, Lou Anna Hardee, Dawn Harrison, Archana Hegde, Jason Higginson, Jennifer Hodgson, Pamela Hopkins, Jakob Jensen, Plummer Jones, Andrea Kitta, Angela Lamson, Kim Larson, Janice Lewis, Huigang Liang, Aaron Lucier, Susan McCammon, Vivian Mott, Sandra Nobles, Patty Peebles, Annette Peery, Nancy Ray, April Reed, Leah Riddell, Jonelle Romero, Melanie Sartore, Lorie Sigmon, Robert Stagg, Jamie Williams, Marsha Tripp, Tracy Tuten, Deborah Tyndall, Garrett VanHoy, Sandra Warren, Bryan Wheeler, Courtney Williams, Yajiong Xue and Breyah Atkinson.

As he congratulated all of those recognized, Provost Ron Mitchelson said their service to the community and others “is a great testimony to a great university.”

He added, “So much of this work is quiet. I think it’s good for the university to shine a bright light on these efforts.”

 

 

-by Jeannine Manning Hutson, ECU News Services

 

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