Category Archives: Faculty

Leo W. Jenkins Society inducts new members at annual planned giving event

Every year, generous donors make planned gifts to East Carolina University that support countless scholarships, professorships and research funds. This year was no different, with donors championing areas from geology to nursing to art and design.

Charlotte resident and ’74 social work graduate Wanda Montano made a gift to support health and human performance students who demonstrate leadership.

Psychology professor Dr. Susan McCammon made a bequest provision in her will to establish an endowment scholarship for future psychology students.

And retired dentist Dr. Thomas Long made a planned gift that will support an endowed scholarship in the School of Dental Medicine.

Dr. Thomas Long was honored by Chancellor Cecil Staton and the university during the Leo W. Jenkins Society event for his planned gift to support an endowed scholarship at the ECU School of Dental Medicine. (Photos by Will Preslar)

Dr. Thomas Long was honored by Chancellor Cecil Staton and the university during the Leo W. Jenkins Society event for his planned gift to support an endowed scholarship at the ECU School of Dental Medicine. (Photos by Will Preslar)

Montano, McCammon and Long are part of an esteemed group of donors known as the Leo W. Jenkins Society. Named after the former ECU chancellor, the society honors philanthropic benefactors of the university who make planned gifts such as will bequests, retirement plan beneficiary designations, charitable remainder trusts, charitable gift annuities and life insurance policy designations.

On Dec. 8, the society inducted 20 new members, three of whom received medallions of recognition at a luncheon at the ECU Heart Institute in Greenville.

“ECU students deserve the same opportunities as those at elite universities. They deserve to learn the skills that will enable them to be citizens in a global economy,” Chancellor Cecil Staton told the crowd. “The things that hold our students back are resources.”

Planned gifts go a long way toward increasing those resources, he added as he thanked the donors for their planned gifts. “No university advancement activities would be possible without planned giving. What you are doing is vital,” he said.

There are more than 260 Leo Jenkins Society members. The university expects to receive more than $170 million from current known commitments of planned gifts over the next 25-30 years, according to Greg Abeyounis, associate vice chancellor for development.

McCammon, the psychology professor, said she was only able to attend college because of financial aid from scholarships. Now, she’s in a position to pass it on.

“I’d like to see that future students receive assistance like I was fortunate enough to receive,” she said.

Montano, a 1974 ECU graduate, attended the luncheon wearing purple from head to toe. She said the university changed her life. A first-generation college student, she learned at ECU how to think critically and take charge. Her gift will go to a scholarship to support leadership because leadership and engagement are important qualities for students to develop, she said.

“You don’t live on this earth to sit on the couch and watch TV. You go out and have an impact on it.”

Wanda Montano receives her Leo W. Jenkins medallion from Chancellor Cecil Staton during the Jenkins Society event on Dec. 8. Montano’s planned gift will support a scholarship for leadership excellence.

Wanda Montano receives her Leo W. Jenkins medallion from Chancellor Cecil Staton during the Jenkins Society event on Dec. 8. Montano’s planned gift will support a scholarship for leadership excellence.

Complete list of 2017 Leo W. Jenkins Society inductees and what their gifts will support:

Jeffrey Brame, Stan and Ann Riggs Endowment Fund

Dr. Susan McCammon, Dr. Susan McCammon Scholarship Endowment

Gordon Basnight, Kimberly Basnight Memorial Nursing Scholarship in the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation Inc.

Dr. Scott Colclough, Robert F. Hodges Scholarship Endowment, Kevin Alfonso Banks Scholarship Endowment

David Gaskins, David Gaskins Recreation Sports Scholarship Endowment

Michael McCammon, Michael McCammon Scholarship Endowment

Nancy Monroe, The Monroe Veterans Support Endowment Fund, The Dr. & Mrs. Edwin and Nancy Monroe Endowed Fund, Monroe Art Endowment

Patricia Beaver, Geology Alumni Century Fund

Dr. Thomas Long, June Rose Endowed Scholarship Fund

Dr. Geneva White Britt, Harold & Lois White Scholarship Endowment

Dorothy Satterfield, John and Dorothy Satterfield Scholarship Endowment

Angela Sutton Furniss, College of Business

Wanda Montano, Wanda Montano Scholarship for Leadership Excellence

Six individuals made provisions in their estates to support ECU but wished to remain anonymous. Their gifts will support student scholarships and athletics.

Eight existing Leo Jenkins Society members also made additional gifts through their estates. These donors are Michael Aho, David Bond, Neil Bullock, Margaret Hendricks, Dr. R. McConnell, Mike Renn, Jenny Tolson and Dr. Robert West.

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

Laupus Library recognizes 127 health sciences authors

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences gathered in an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 12th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 14, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library.

“It’s a privilege to host this event to honor the faculty and staff who’ve expanded and enriched the scholarly culture of our university and reputation of the division of health sciences,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It is truly inspiring to see this breadth of research.”

There were 127 authors honored this year, who published 440 qualified peer-reviewed publications including journal articles, book chapters and other creative works between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017. Twelve books were also published by 10 authors this year.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, recognized a record-breaking number of authors and publications from the college since the beginning of the awards program.

“It is so important to recognize our faculty scholars,” said Orlikoff. “We spend a lot of time talking about the importance of maximizing student success but we don’t do enough to recognize that it’s the scholarship and dedication of our faculty that makes student success possible.”

Authors from Laupus Library, the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, gave special remarks about the important role of the library’s systematic review services in the advancement of research. Lee has worked closely with Laupus librarians to successfully conduct and complete systematic reviews.

Lee’s work includes documenting health disparities for LGBT people, seeking to understand the origins of those disparities, and identifying and evaluating policy interventions to improve health equity. He also conducts studies of tobacco prevention and control with an eye towards public health policy and reduction of disparities.

“I think it’s perfect that Laupus Library hosts this recognition of scholarly achievements and I think that both in terms of making sure that we have access to the right information and to the skills and services I have access to as a user of the library,” he said.

“As the research enterprise grows at ECU, the library will expand its services to partner with our researchers in disseminating and publishing information,” said Ketterman. “We look forward to expanding the event in years to come to recognize our faculty and staff and their collective efforts to increase the knowledgebase of the health science.”

Registration for the 2017-18 author awards will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communication

ECU hosts 3-day symposium on central-eastern European politics

East Carolina University students and the local community recently had the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of foreign affairs and contribute to the international exchange of ideas and perceptions during a three-day symposium on central and eastern European politics.

The event, “Visegrad in the 21st Century,” sponsored by a grant from the International Visegrad Fund, was hosted Nov. 13-15 by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Department of Political Science and the Office of Undergraduate Research.

Dr. Adam Eberhardt visited ECU through a grant awarded to professors in the THCAS Department of Political Science to increase student and public awareness about foreign affairs.<br /> (Contributed photos.)

Dr. Adam Eberhardt visited ECU through a grant awarded to professors in the THCAS Department of Political Science to increase student and public awareness about foreign affairs.
(Contributed photos.)

Two guest speakers from Poland and Czechia – two of the four central European states that make up the Visegrád group (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia), or Visegrád Four as they are also known – visited campus during the event.

The researchers presented on topics ranging from Polish-Russian relations and Russia’s foreign policy towards central-eastern Europe, to the Visegrád States in a broader context and the Czech people’s exile during the Cold War.

“Our overall goal was for ECU students to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and transformations the east-central European states have experienced in the last 25 years of democratic transitions, European Union and NATO membership, as well as these states’ changing foreign relations with Russia,” said Dr. Magda Giurcanu, teaching assistant professor of political science, who helped organize the event.

On Monday, Dr. Adam Eberhardt, director of the Center for Eastern Studies, a Polish think tank that undertakes independent research on the political, economic and social situation in central and eastern Europe, predominantly discussed Russia’s economy and foreign policy as well as Polish-Russian relations.

Eberhardt argued that Russia perceives the western European countries to be weak. However, Russia challenges the security of neighboring countries by asking for concessions without offering anything in return.

He also said there is little to no modernization because of the “law of the ruler,” and after 17 years in power, President Putin has no desire to tackle the challenges to the Russian state.

Dr. Martin Nekola visited ECU.

Dr. Martin Nekola visited ECU.

“Russia is not the Soviet Union of the Cold War,” said Eberhardt.

A roundtable discussion was held Tuesday afternoon with Eberhardt; ECU political science faculty Drs. Armin Krishnan and Giurcanu; and Dr. Martin Nekola, an independent scholar from Prague, whose research focuses on non-democratic regimes, the era of Communism, Czech communities abroad and the east-European, anti-communist exiles to the United States during the Cold War.

On Wednesday, Nekola gave a presentation on his research pertaining to the Czech migration, which began Feb. 20, 1948 and lasted until 1989. Many researchers disagree on the total number of Czech citizens who fled Czechia, but Nekola said 250,000 seems to be a realistic number. Many of the citizens traveled to refugee camps in Germany, Austria, Italy and France.

“The atmosphere was tense,” said Nekola, referring to the fear and frustration felt immediately following WWII.

As time passed, the people also began emigrating to Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada and the United States. Nekola’s research has traced a number of Czechian descendants to cities in the U.S. that have strong Czech communities, including Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, New York, St. Louis, and possibly Charlotte and New Salem, North Carolina.

Closing out the three-day symposium, students in the course presented research posters on topics that were covered throughout the semester. Attendees voted on the two best posters. First place and a $100 award went to Josiah Thornton, India Peele and Dwayne Lewis Jr. for “The Transition of Central Europe: The Fate of Visegrad,” and the second place award of $50 went to Natalie Best, Kaitlyn Rose and Josh Ziegler for “Slovakia and Hungary’s Case brought to the European Court of Justice: Legality of the Challenge.”

Drs. Nekola, Giurcanu, Eberhardt and Krishnan

Drs. Nekola, Giurcanu, Eberhardt and Krishnan.

One more guest lecturer associated with the International Visegrad Fund grant will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in Howell, room N107. The presentation will feature Dr. Bartosz Rydlinski of Poland.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

ECU administrator recognized by state and nation

Ellen Hilgoe, associate director of the N.C. Early Mathematics Placement Testing Program (N.C. EMPT) housed at East Carolina University, is receiving local and national attention for her work in preparing high school students for college-level mathematics courses.

“N.C. EMPT helps strengthen ECU’s mission to reach out and offer early intervention to not only the high school students in the eastern part of the state, but statewide and across state lines,” said Hilgoe.

•Ellen Hilgoe, pictured here with ECU Mathematics Chair Johannes Hattingh, is the 2017 recipient of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics Innovator Award. (contributed photos.)

Ellen Hilgoe, pictured here with ECU Mathematics Chair Johannes Hattingh, is the 2017 recipient of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics Innovator Award. (contributed photos.)

In October, Hilgoe received national recognition for the program, when she was selected to present a session on “N.C. Early Mathematics Placement Testing Program: A Looking Glass into College Math Readiness,” at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Conference held in Orlando, Florida.

Organizers of the conference mentioned in opening sessions that they received hundreds of applications to present.

•Hilgoe presented information about the N.C. EMPT Program during the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Conference in Orlando, Florida, in October.

Hilgoe presented information about the N.C. EMPT Program during the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Conference in Orlando, Florida, in October.

“I was so fortunate to be chosen,” said Hilgoe. “Spreading the word about N.C. EMPT in my presentation to mathematics educators from more than 10 southern states, as well as others across our nation, was an opportunity to share N.C. EMPT’s accomplishments, highlight ECU’s name, emphasize North Carolina’s dedication to mathematically preparing its youth for their futures and to proudly assert that N.C. EMPT is the largest EMPT program in the nation.”

Since the conference, Hilgoe also has received local acknowledgement and honors.

On Nov. 2, she was presented with the 2017 North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics Innovator Award. Hilgoe received the award at the council’s 47th annual conference celebration in Greensboro.

During the event, the council stated, “North Carolina mathematics education is fortunate to call this innovator one of our own.”

“It was wonderful to be recognized at the state level by the N.C. Council of Teachers of Mathematics,” said Hilgoe. “With more than three-quarters of a million students served, we continue to strive to provide each participant with a reality check of readiness for college-level math and the motivation to maintain strong math skills.”

The N.C. EMPT Program recently completed its 20th year of service to all North Carolina public and non-public high schools. For more information visit http://www.ncempt.org.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Trick or Treat event brings children, families to Laupus Library

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library at East Carolina University held its third annual Health Sciences Trick or Treat event on Oct. 27 throughout the library.

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Anne Anderson, curator for the Country Doctor Museum explains how surgical instruments were used long ago. (contributed photos)

Attended by over 400 ECU faculty, staff, students and their children, who enjoyed participating a variety of games, crafts and trick-or-treating.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

Occupational Therapy Student, Lauren Selingo, enjoys the many creative costumes worn by attendees.

“My four-year-old grandson had such a great time,” said Terrie Hamilton, instructor in the School of Hospitality Leadership. “The Laupus staff did a great job decorating their offices, dressing in costume and spending time with each of the trick-or-treating children. We even appreciated the dental students and their tooth brushes – it gave us a chance to incorporate health care into the experience.”

“This also provided an excellent opportunity for those of us on the main campus to visit the health sciences campus and explore some of what is offered there,” she added. “What a wonderful way to show my grandson that libraries are fun and exciting places.”

A costume contest was also held with the winners announced on Laupus Library’s Facebook page.

The Country Doctor Museum photo booth also offered families a chance to explore spooky archives and pose with some of the items from its collections.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

Families pose for photos at the Halloween event.

To view photos from the event, costume contest and photo booth, visit the Laupus Health Sciences Library at ECU Facebook page at www.facebook.com/eculaupus/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

 

College of Education inducts 18 into its Hall of Fame

Eighteen people were inducted into the ECU Educators Hall of Fame during a ceremony on Oct. 28.

The new members are Joseph B. Atkins of Oxford, Mississippi, Alan R. Bailey of Ayden, Cindi Branch Brown of Winterville, Michael Landreth Donnell of West End, the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown of Greenville, Sharon Harris Floyd of Greenville, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins of Washington, Gwenlyn Goodson Jeffreys of Greensboro, Megon Ann Clayton Mancini of Concord, Dionna Leigh Draper Manning of Winterville, the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., of Washington, Rodney Lynn McNeill of Winterville, Karen Catoe Meetze of Greenville, the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell of Charlotte, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson of Greenville, Tara Wooten Parker of Greenville, Sandra Kay Eldridge Seay of Winterville, and Edison Earl Watson of Raleigh.

Members of the 2017 class of inductees to the ECU College of Education Educator’s Hall of Fame include, back row, from left to right, Megon Ann Clayton, a representative of the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown, Joseph B. Atkins, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins, a representative of the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell, Rodney Lynn McNeill, a representative of the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., Edison Earl Watson, Sharon Harris Floyd, Michael Landreth Donnell and Alan R. Bailey. Front row, from left to right, Karen Catoe Meetze, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson, Sandra Kay Eldridge, Tara Wooten Parker, Cindi Branch Brown and Dionna Leigh Draper Manning. (contributed photo)

Members of the 2017 class of inductees to the ECU College of Education Educator’s Hall of Fame include, back row, from left to right, Megon Ann Clayton, a representative of the late Regina Figueiredo-Brown, Joseph B. Atkins, Lawrence Jay Hodgkins, a representative of the late Miriam Grace Sexton Mitchell, Rodney Lynn McNeill, a representative of the late Ernest Roy McNair, Jr., Edison Earl Watson, Sharon Harris Floyd, Michael Landreth Donnell and Alan R. Bailey. Front row, from left to right, Karen Catoe Meetze, Sarah DeRitter Mitchelson, Sandra Kay Eldridge, Tara Wooten Parker, Cindi Branch Brown and Dionna Leigh Draper Manning. (contributed photo)

The event raised more than $27,000 for student scholarships in the College of Education.

Each inductee was sponsored with a monetary gift of $1,000 or more in support of the college’s Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship endowment. Annual interest from the endowment is used to fund merit-based scholarships for education students.

Since 1999, the Educators Hall of Fame has recognized the service and contributions of more than 469 individuals who have impacted the lives of others, the field of education and the College of Education at ECU. The annual event has raised more than $574,000 toward the endowment goal of $1 million for scholarships.

For more information, contact Terah Archie in the College of Education’s Office of Community Relations and Outreach at Archiet15@ecu.edu or 252-737-1257.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Brody dean launches staff initiative

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

The dean of ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, Dr. Mark Stacy, is seeking suggestions from Brody employees about how to “build a better Brody,” and he’s setting aside $100,000 to put their best ideas into practice.

The Brody Staff Leadership Initiative seeks to tap into the knowledge, experience and creativity of the medical school’s employees to improve office efficiency, morale, the work environment and the overall culture at Brody, Stacy said.

“Those employees who are closest to a process, who work in a certain area on a daily basis, are the ones who can best identify how to make things work better,” said Stacy. “I want to empower those people to influence positive change. This is their chance to make a difference.”

All Brody SHRA and CSS staff are eligible to submit a proposal. While employees are encouraged to work in groups to strengthen their requests, proposals from individuals will also be considered.

The deadline for entries is Dec. 15, 2017.

All submissions will be reviewed by a representative group of Brody staff and the Dean’s Administrative Leadership Team. Winners will be announced at a ceremony and celebration event Jan. 10.

All requests – and any questions – should be submitted to Gary Vanderpool, executive associate vice chancellor for health sciences administration and finance, at vanderpoolg@ecu.edu.

For the proposal guidelines and template, visit www.ecu.edu/med/better.

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communications

ECU faculty members inducted as FAANS

College of Nursing faculty members Dr. Sonya Hardin, left, and Dr. Donna Lake, right, were inducted as Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. They are pictured at the induction ceremony with Dr. Susan Kennerly, a professor in the College of Nursing who was inducted as a Fellow in 2016. (Contributed photos)

College of Nursing faculty members Dr. Sonya Hardin, left, and Dr. Donna Lake, right, were inducted as Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. They are pictured at the induction ceremony with Dr. Susan Kennerly, a professor in the College of Nursing who was inducted as a Fellow in 2016. (Contributed photos)

Two East Carolina University (ECU) faculty members were recently inducted as fellows in the American Academy of Nursing. The College of Nursing’s Dr. Sonya Hardin and Dr. Donna Lake were honored during a ceremony at the academy’s annual conference Oct. 5-7, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

“I am proud to welcome this talented cohort of nurses as they join the ranks of the nation’s foremost health care thought leaders,” said Academy President Bobbie Berkowitz. “They bring a rich variety of expertise to the table, and we look forward to recognizing their accomplishments at our policy conference, and then working with them to transform health policy, practice, and research by applying our collective nursing knowledge.”

Selection criteria include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care, and sponsorship by two current Academy fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel comprised of elected and appointed fellows, and selection is based, in part, on the extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the health and wellbeing of all.

Dr. Sonya Hardin

Dr. Sonya Hardin

Hardin is a professor and the associate dean of Graduate Nursing Programs in the College of Nursing. She leads an interdisciplinary team as the program director for a $2.5 million Health Resources & Services Administration-funded Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program grant.

With extensive national service with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses setting national standards and developing the AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care, Hardin has impacted more than 80,000 acute and critical care nurses currently certified worldwide in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care. She has disseminated the model through consulting at hospitals across the United States. She is certified in critical care and as an Adult Nurse Practitioner. She received her nurse practitioner training from ECU, a PhD from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and post-doctoral fellowships at UNC-Chapel Hill and Stanford University.

“It is an honor to be selected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing,” Hardin said. “My goal has been to make a difference in the outcomes of patient care and to strengthen the profession through patient advocacy. I am excited to have an opportunity to work with leaders within the US and from around the world to advance health policy and clinical practice.”

Lake is a clinical associate professor of advanced nursing practice and education. She has extensive international experience leading healthcare and academic teams within the Middle East, Europe, Latin America and Africa. Prior to ECU, she spent 25 years in various executive and clinical nursing roles culminating as Colonel in the U.S. Air Force. She has also played an instrumental role in the improvement of corporate quality policies, health promotion and primary care for 68 medical facilities worldwide.

Dr. Donna Lake

Dr. Donna Lake

Lake is the only nurse representative on the $11 million American Medical Association grant-funded initiative Redesigning Education to Accelerate Change in Healthcare (REACH), creating the first of its kind “Teachers in Quality Academy.” She received her BSN from Stony Brook University of New York, a Master’s of Education from the University of Oklahoma and a PhD from Touro University.

“Being inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing is a very exciting and a prestigious honor,” Lake said. “Having met many of the Fellows during the induction and conference, it was incredible to learn of their expansive clinical, research, and global and national leadership impacts to the profession of nursing and healthcare delivery systems.

“I am more energized and look forward to my Fellow responsibilities and ECU faculty role to continue my work in engaging with other health leaders in transforming American’s health system, strengthening nursing and health delivery systems, nationally and internationally.”

Hardin and Lake are among 11 inductees from the state of North Carolina this year. They join five other current ECU College of Nursing faculty members as FAANs.

The academy is comprised of more than 2,500 nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy and research. Fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans and renowned scientific researchers.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

First-Generation College Celebration

First-generation students are defined broadly (neither parent has completed a four-year degree) or narrowly (neither parent has any postsecondary education).  With nearly one-third of freshman cohorts across the country designated first-generation, colleges and universities are building programs and resources specific to them and their needs.  ECU is no different.

According to the 2014 Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE) survey, between one-third and one-half of all first-time, full-time students entering ECU in Fall 2014 would be considered first generation students. For example, 55% of respondents to BCSSE indicated that no parent/guardian had a bachelor’s degree or higher and 33% indicated no parent had any schooling beyond high school. (Note: The 2017 BCSSE was administered during this past summer orientation).  

ECU is poised to continue intentional program for first-generation students and their families in order to address the challenges and needs of these students.  We begin by joining institutions around the country in celebrating first-generation college students, faculty, and staff on our campus.

Sponsored by NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and the American Association of Colleges & Universities (AACU), and ECU’s Division of Student Affairs, the inaugural First-Generation College Celebration is being celebrated nationally on November 8, 2017.  As a first-generation administrator, faculty, staff, and/or student, we invite you to join us in celebration.

Please respond at this link: https://ecu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2b0krEvnCxzQ7Bj

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mary Beth Corbin at corbinm@ecu.edu or 252-328-4173.

 

 

 

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