Category Archives: Faculty

Course partnership promotes student success and future employment

Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library.

Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library. (Contributed photos)

A course being offered in Spring 2019 will provide students a strong foundation in research skills and public health content that will benefit them across a wealth of disciplines as well as in their employment after graduation.

HLTH 4050: Research Skills in Health Information will be taught by Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Performance’s Department of Health Education and Promotion; and Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library. The course covers skills that are vital to student success and is beneficial to students in disciplines across the Health Sciences Campus.

“This course covers important pieces of health literacy and evidence evaluation and will give students strong skills in the PubMed/MEDLINE database,” Lee said. “It’s a one-credit class and would be a great course for any student interested in attending graduate school or for future health profession skills. It would also be a great course for students early in their career at ECU who are interested in research.”

The class will meet from 1­–1:50 p.m. on Wednesdays.

The value in the course is based not only in its content but in its unique teaching arrangement.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the department of health education and promotion for the College of Health and Human Performance.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the department of health education and promotion for the College of Health and Human Performance.

“This partnership between a librarian and faculty members in Health Education and Promotion as equals really highlights the importance of the interdisciplinary skills that our students need,” Lee said. “Employers want our students to have expertise in health literacy, information literacy and concrete searching skills combined with public health content expertise. We’re excited to continue the course with Laupus’s support and Dr. Haberstroh’s expertise.”

Leah Cordova, MLIS, in Joyner served as the embedded liaison librarian for past sections of HLTH 4050 and was instrumental in creating this course. The teamwork has resulted in instructional topics that improve students’ competencies in finding and evaluating information and evidence-based practice.

Students have echoed that sentiment; some who have completed the course said that it expanded their knowledge on research and “made a difference in my current classes.” Others said the course encourages discussion, during which they ‘learned to apply course material in practical ways.”

HLTH 4050 helps bridge gaps between what students are learning and processing and how to think critically in terms of seeking out knowledge through research.

“We know these information literacy skills are incredibly important for our public health students and to their future employers,” said Dr. Don Chaney, chair of the Department of Health Education and Promotion, “and our partnerships with Joyner and Laupus combine our faculty’s public health expertise with librarians’ expertise in health literacy, evidence-based searching and information skills.”

A one-on-one meeting with then-vice president George Herbert Walker Bush

ECU’s Dr. David Edgell shares his memories of a private meeting he had with President George H.W. Bush when he served as vice-president under President Ronald Reagan. Edgell is a professor of hospitality leadership in the College of Business’ School of Hospitality Leadership and worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce in the late 1980s.

ECU Professor Dr. David Edgell, former senior executive director of U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, reads from the prepared statement that he read on behalf of Vice President George H. W. Bush to attendees of the International Conference of Tourism in the 1990s.

ECU Professor Dr. David Edgell, former senior executive director of U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, reads from the prepared statement that he read on behalf of Vice President George H. W. Bush to attendees of the International Conference of Tourism in the 1990s. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

In the spring of 1986 I was invited by the Deputy Chief of Staff for Vice President George H. W. Bush to a meeting with the vice president in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building across from the White House. At the time, I was a young executive in the U.S. Department of Commerce working on trade and tourism policies. I anticipated that the meeting would include several individuals but learned, to my surprise, it was a one-on-one meeting with the vice president to discuss, among other topics, trade and tourism policies. Naturally, I was both awed and excited but was quickly put at ease by the Vice President Bush’s friendly and warm demeanor. I was a bit nervous and anxious, but he set me at ease. I also remember the informality of the meeting such that I almost forgot to whom I was speaking. Vice President Bush was aware of my role in helping to develop and work toward passage of the National Tourism Policy Act of 1981 (it was the third piece of legislation signed Oct. 16, 1981, by President Ronald Reagan).

My conversation with the vice president gradually moved toward a discussion of trade and tourism relations with Canada where the United States had a trade office in Ottawa and a regional tourism office in Toronto. At that time, the U.S. had an excellent working relationship with Canada on trade and tourism policy matters. Shortly after this meeting, I was asked to work on a special trade in tourism agreement titled “A Cooperative Tourism Research Agreement Between the Government of Canada and the United States of America” which was signed for the U.S. by Vice President George Bush June 11, 1986, in Vancouver, Canada. To my delight, the Vice President’s Office prepared a glass-framed official copy of the “agreement,” including the pen the vice president used to sign the “agreement,” and then presented it to me (it proudly occupies a special wall in our home).

A gift from Vice President George H. W. Bush to Dr. David Edgell.

A gift from Vice President George H. W. Bush to Dr. David Edgell.

The tourism research agreement became somewhat of a precursor to the “Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement” (FTA) signed for the United States by President Ronald Reagan Jan. 2, 1988. The FTA, for the first time in U.S trade agreement history, included provisions on the “services industry.” The FTA laid the groundwork for the “Tourism Policy and Export Promotion Act of 1992” signed by President George Herbert Walker Bush on Sept. 30, 1992, and the “North American Free Trade Agreement” (NAFTA) which included the United States, Canada and Mexico. NAFTA was signed by U.S. President George H.W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, and Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari Dec. 17, 1992.

At the ECU’s College of Business, we build leaders. VP Bush, in my view, had excellent leadership qualities. He was certainly a committed public servant having served as a congressman, ambassador to China, head of the CIA, etc. He was both a good communicator, listener and innovator. In short, he was a good decision-maker.

 

-by Dr. David Edgell, professor of hospitality leadership

Roaming through a unique outdoor concert

If you missed it the first time through, “Ponder: Outdoor Concert” will allow you to experience music in a different way on Friday, Nov. 30. The brass ensemble will play around Lake Laupus on East Carolina University’s Health Sciences Campus beginning at 3 p.m. The nearly 40-minute concert is the product of ECU assistant music professor Dr. Travis Alford.

ECU music professor Dr. Travis Alford plays the trumpet during the outdoor performance of his composition “Ponder.”

ECU music professor Dr. Travis Alford plays the trumpet during the outdoor performance of his composition “Ponder.” (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Alford is a 2005 graduate of ECU’s School of Music and wrote this piece in 2012 when he was a graduate and doctoral student at Brandeis University in Massachusetts. He said it was written based on composer George Frideric Handel’s “Water Music” and was first performed around a fountain at Brandeis. While Alford said the name “Ponder” is an open-ended title, his wife came up with the name as a play on words since the music was composed to be played around a body of water.

ECU senior Joshua Poyner plays the tuba during “Ponder.” About 32 brass musicians were spread out around the Cupola for the performance.

ECU senior Joshua Poyner plays the tuba during “Ponder.” About 32 brass musicians were spread out around the Cupola for the performance.

The first performance at ECU did not take place around the fountain, but instead on the mall around the Cupola. Nearly three dozen brass performers – including trumpets, French horns, euphoniums and tubas – spread out along the mall for the piece. Each performer was also given a hand percussion instrument, like a temple gong, to play as well. As the music was performed, those walking through campus could stop and listen, or walk right through the performance.

“This was nice. I felt like the audience could be right in the middle of the music,” Alford said.

A bonus to walking through the performers was the chance to listen to different aspects of the music.

“All of the different melodies will kind of merge together in one area. So, I think that it’s a really cool idea,” said tuba performer and ECU music student Joshua Poyner. The performers were a mixture of ECU students and faculty.

“Wherever it’s performed, I want to allow people to just sort of stop and listen to the sounds around them to sort of experience the piece,” Alford said. “More than just listen to it – to experience the sights and smells and sounds of just being in the space.”

 

-by Rich Klindworth, ECU News Services

Laupus Library recognizes 119 health sciences authors

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences gathered in an annual celebration of research and scholarship Nov. 8 at the William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library’s 13th annual Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards.

The event was held at The Martinsborough at the Jefferson Blount Harvey Building and was sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library.

Former Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Dr. Phyllis Horns presented book author Dr. Kathleen Sitzman, professor for the College of Nursing with a Laupus Bronze medallion during a Nov. 8 celebration held at The Martinsborough at the Jefferson Blount Harvey Building in Greenville.

Former Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Dr. Phyllis Horns presented book author Dr. Kathleen Sitzman, professor for the College of Nursing, with a Laupus Bronze medallion during a Nov. 8 celebration held at The Martinsborough at the Jefferson Blount Harvey Building in Greenville. (Photos by Michelle Messer)

“Part of the joy in being a librarian in the health sciences is supporting and partnering with the talented faculty and researchers in our health professions schools and colleges,” Laupus Library Director Beth Ketterman said. “Laupus Library is in the unique position to contribute to the success of each author in this room, whether through our leadership in providing the highest quality health information, or through our services and support throughout the research lifecycle.”

Dr. Greg Kearney, associate professor in the department of public health was one of 50 authors recognized from the Brody School of Medicine.

Dr. Greg Kearney, associate professor in the department of public health was one of 50 authors recognized from the Brody School of Medicine.

This year, 119 authors published 329 qualified peer-reviewed publications including journal articles, book chapters and other creative works between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018. Six books were also published by five authors.

Former Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Dr. Phyllis Horns presented book authors with a Laupus Bronze medallion cast to commemorate the life of William E. Laupus, the first dean of the School of Medicine and first vice chancellor for health sciences at ECU. The medallion is awarded to acknowledge and thank special friends whose generosity and support helped build the library’s collections and programs and making its services more readily available to the citizens of North Carolina.

“It is great to be able to celebrate all our authors, and I think the occasion is particularly important and especially appropriate for us to offer special recognition for our book authors,” Horns said. “What we are doing here in the division will continue to be a tradition.”

Brody School of Medicine Alumnus and Chair of the Friends of Laupus Library, Dr. John Papalas speaks about the importance of the Friends to Laupus Library and the Division of Health Sciences at ECU.

Brody School of Medicine Alumnus and Chair of the Friends of Laupus Library, Dr. John Papalas speaks about the importance of the Friends to Laupus Library and the Division of Health Sciences at ECU.

Authors from the Brody School of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Allied Health Sciences, Laupus Library, School of Dental Medicine and the College of Health and Human Performance were recognized by name and school or college on a ceremonial display, now available for viewing on the second floor of Laupus Library.

“I was very impressed with the event and the recognition that was given to the faculty and staff authors,” said Denise Donica, associate professor and interim chair of the department of occupational therapy for the College of Allied Health Sciences. “I made it my personal goal to qualify to attend the event every year and have worked really hard to do so. I really appreciate all that Laupus Library and the Friends of Laupus Library do to support not only the College of Allied Health Sciences but the Division of Health Sciences.”

“The faculty and staff in the health disciplines have once again demonstrated a commitment to expanding the scholarly culture of ECU,” Ketterman said. “Their impressive scope of research and publishing in the last year contribute to the scholarly record of their fields and grow the reputation of the university.”

Registration for the 2018-19 author awards will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://hsl.ecu.edu/events/hsara

Dr. Marie Pokorny and other members of the Friends of Laupus Library stand to be recognized for their sponsorship and ongoing support of the author event and other library programs.

Dr. Marie Pokorny and other members of the Friends of Laupus Library stand to be recognized for their sponsorship and ongoing support of the author event and other library programs.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Seven teams advance to the final round of the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge

East Carolina University and the Miller School of Entrepreneurship announced the seven student-led teams that will compete in the final round of the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge.

Team finalists include:

  • Vybe, an app for night life analytics
  • Invisibarrier, mosquito control service
  • Tailgate Classics, classic sports apparel
  • Ola Customs, custom suits
  • AntiPasta, cord management for medical equipment
  • Health4Pine, youth coaching for health and life skills
  • Sweet Sip, stainless steel straws to reduce plastic waste
Hunter Graves responds to a question from judges during the second round of the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge. Graves' business venture, InvisiBarrier Mosquito Control, was selected to move to the third round of competition.

Hunter Graves responds to a question from judges during the second round of the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge. Graves’ business venture, InvisiBarrier Mosquito Control, was selected to move to the third round of competition. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

The finalists were chosen from 13 teams that competed in the second round of the challenge, which was held Nov. 15 at the ECU Heart Institute. Each team had five minutes to pitch its idea to a panel of six judges. Before breaking to vote, the judges took 10 minutes to ask follow-up questions.

John Ciannamea directs a question to one of the student-led teams.

John Ciannamea directs a question to one of the student-led teams.

“Tonight was an exciting evening to showcase some the best entrepreneurs across our campus. All of the teams impressed the judges with the quality of their ideas and pitches. These finalists are well deserving to move on to the next round,” said David Mayo, Miller School of Entrepreneurship instructor and challenge coordinator.

The panel of judges for the second round included Ariana Billingsley, Hallie Hawkins and Steven Jacobs of the Small Business Technology Development Center; Dennis Tracz and Mike Aman, who serve in ECU’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence Program; and John Ciannamea, innovator-in-residence and director of SEED@ECU.

The final round of the Pirate Entrepreneurship Challenge is Feb. 21 from 6-8 p.m. at Harvey Hall in ECU’s Murphy Center. To prepare for the round, each finalist will be paired with a mentor who will serve as an advisor and coach. Additionally, the teams will receive branding help, legal consultation and dress presentation assistance from the challenge’s sponsors.

More than $75,000 in cash prizes and in-kind services will be awarded. More than 91 teams entered this year’s challenge.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Brody physician named head of state medical society

Dr. Timothy Reeder, associate professor and executive vice chair for clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, was recently sworn in as president of the North Carolina Medical Society.

Dr. Timothy Reeder (Contributed photos)

Dr. Timothy Reeder, associate professor and executive vice chair for clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, was recently sworn in as president of the North Carolina Medical Society.

Reeder, who has been with East Carolina University since 1998, earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Ohio State University, where he also completed his residency training in emergency medicine. He holds a master’s degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Reeder’s clinical interests include trauma care, pediatric emergency care and disaster medicine. His educational interests include health systems science, including patient safety, quality and leadership. He serves as director of Brody’s Health System Transformation and Leadership Distinction Track, which prepares medical students with advanced expertise in patient safety, quality improvement, interprofessional team-based care and population health.

He has made three medical mission trips to Nicaragua, where he provided primary care in the rural mountain villages of Jinotega, as well as trauma and cardiac education to medical staffs in Leon and Managua.

Reeder

Reeder

He was sworn in as the society’s 165th president during its LEAD Health Care Conference in Raleigh on Oct. 19. He previously served the society in a variety of roles, including secretary-treasurer, member of its board of directors, and member of its finance, credentials and communications, and membership advisory committees. He was president of the Pitt County Medical Society in 2007.

During his inaugural address, Reeder stressed the importance of returning joy to the practice of medicine.

“Over the next year I hope to help re-establish the joy in medicine for us. The activities of our organization must at their core, support and ensure the patient-physician relationship. For this is what gives us meaning and joy in our practice and profession,” Reeder said. “No matter the specialty, years in practice, or how disillusioned we may have become, the unifying principle that brought us into medicine was our desire to help another human being through the doctor-patient relationship.”

Reeder said he is honored to have this opportunity to provide leadership toward improving the health of North Carolinians.

“We will continue to provide leadership education to physicians, support physician wellness initiatives and prepare for Medicaid transformation,” he said. “This honor allows me to represent the unique needs of ECU and Brody through the North Carolina Medical Society to the Legislature, payers and leaders across the state.”

 

-by Rob Spahr, University Communications

Six ECU faculty members collaborate on new book

Faculty members from ECU who collaborated on a new environmental health book recently presented copies to Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman, director of Laupus Library, (far left bottom row) and Janice Lewis, director of Joyner Library (next to Ketterman). The faculty are top row left to right, Dr. Tim Kelley, Dr. Greg Kearney, Dr. Paul Knechtges and Dr. Charlie Humphrey, and bottom row left to right, Ketterman and Lewis with Dr. Jo Anne Balanay and Dr. Stephanie Richards.

Faculty members from ECU who collaborated on a new environmental health book recently presented copies to Elizabeth “Beth” Ketterman, director of Laupus Library, (far left bottom row) and Janice Lewis, director of Joyner Library (next to Ketterman). The faculty are top row left to right, Dr. Tim Kelley, Dr. Greg Kearney, Dr. Paul Knechtges and Dr. Charlie Humphrey, and bottom row left to right, Ketterman and Lewis with Dr. Jo Anne Balanay and Dr. Stephanie Richards. (Contributed photo)

Six faculty members from East Carolina University have collaborated on a new book focusing on the theory and science behind environmental health as well as real world issues faced by practitioners.

ECU’s Dr. Greg Kearney and Dr. Paul Knechtges, along with Dr. Beth Resnick from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, are co-editors of “Environmental Public Health: The Practitioner’s Guide.”

ECU faculty members Dr. Jo Anne Balanay, Dr. Charles Humphrey, Dr. Stephanie Richards and Dr. Tim Kelley are chapter contributors. They recently donated copies of the 922-page book to Joyner and Laupus libraries.

Environmental health is a branch of public health that is concerned with all aspects of how the natural and built environment affects human health.

According to the American Public Health Association Press, the book covers the structure, tools, programs and services of environmental public health. Its systems approach will help equip the next generation of environmental health leaders with the tools to tackle challenges that lie ahead, said a news release on the book.

“This is an all-in-one handbook for people getting started in the field and a reference for practitioners throughout their careers,” the release said. “At the same time, the material is designed to be accessible to those who are not environmental public health experts, such as community stakeholders, agencies, educators, policymakers and other groups.”

The guide is expected to be available and distributed to county and state health departments nationwide, said Kelley, director of the ECU environmental health master’s program.

The book has been a collaboration between the ECU Brody School of Medicine’s Department of Public Health and the College of Health and Human Performance’s Department of Health Education and Promotion, where the bachelor and master’s programs in environmental health are located.

In addition, a new doctoral program with a concentration in environmental and occupational health will be part of the developing ECU School of Rural Public Health. The departments of health education and promotion and public health are expected to join the new school in 2020. 

To order the book, call 888-320-APHA, email apha@pbd.com or visit www.aphabookstore.org.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

HHP faculty member receives national award

Dr. Sheresa Blanchard

Dr. Sheresa Blanchard (Contributed photo)

East Carolina University’s Dr. Sheresa Blanchard, assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science in the College of Health and Human Performance, has received a national award.

Blanchard received the Merle B. Karnes Award for Service from the Division for Early Childhood, a part of the Council for Exceptional Children, the largest professional organization dedicated to improving the educational success of individuals with disabilities and/or gifts and talents.

The award is presented to a Division for Early Childhood member who has made a significant contribution in areas of leadership, service, research, advocacy or publications. The award is in honor of Dr. Merle Karnes, who served on the division’s executive board and was the founder and first editor of the Journal for Early Intervention.

Blanchard accepted the award Oct. 26 at the 34th annual International Conference on Young Children with Special Needs and Their Families in Orlando, Florida. For more information, go to http://www.decconference.org/.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

ECU nursing dean named Fellow in the Academy of Nursing Education

ECU College of Nursing Dean Dr. Sylvia Brown was recently inducted as a Fellow in nursing education’s most prestigious organization, placing her among the country’s most respected nurse educators.

Brown was one of 14 distinguished nurse educators inducted in the National League for Nursing’s 12th class of fellows of the Academy of Nursing Education in September.

In a competitive application process, the Academy of Nursing Education review panel considers a multitude of factors before recommending fellowship candidates to the NLN Board of Governors. Evaluations take into account applicants’ contributions to innovative teaching and learning strategies; nursing education research; faculty development activities; academic leadership; promotion of public policy that advances nursing education and collaborative educational, practice or community partnerships.

Dr. Sylvia Brown, center, was recently inducted as a Fellow in the Academy of Nursing Education.

Dr. Sylvia Brown, center, was recently inducted as a Fellow in the Academy of Nursing Education. (Contributed photo)

“I’m so honored and humbled to be named among this prestigious group of nurse educators, who have dedicated their careers to improving not only patient care but the nursing student experience,” Brown said. “The National League for Nursing’s dedication to improving nursing education has been such a critical driver of the quality of care in this country. My goal is to provide a learning environment to ensure student success resulting in competent and caring nurses.”

Brown has served as a faculty member in the ECU College of Nursing for four decades and the past 20 years in multiple administrative roles.

“Dr. Brown’s visionary leadership has drastically improved the quality and accessibility of health care education options available to students,” said interim vice chancellor for health sciences, Dr. Mark Stacy. “As a result, the patients whom ECU nurses serve worldwide can access a higher level of specialized care than ever before, particularly in rural, underserved areas.”

Among her many contributions to nursing education is the implementation of one of the first online nursing programs in the state of North Carolina, the online nursing education concentration in ECU’s Master of Science in Nursing program.

Since being named dean of the college in 2009, Brown spearheaded the college’s adoption of the RIBN (Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses) program, partnering with area community colleges in 2012 as an effort to enhance the educational preparation and diversity of the nursing workforce. The same year, seeing an urgent need for advanced practice nurses, Brown worked with five other deans in the state to obtain approval from the UNC System to offer Doctor of Nursing Practice programs in their institutions.

In 2017, she implemented a Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner program to help address workforce shortages in this much-needed specialty.

“On behalf of the Board of Governors, I congratulate individuals who represent the enterprise, creativity and drive that is the foundation of excellence in nursing education,” said G. Rumay Alexander, the president of the NLN and professor and associate vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “We applaud their critical role in preparing nursing school graduates to deliver sustainable, accessible, culturally-sensitive care to a diverse patient population, which advances the health of the nation and global community.”

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

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