Category Archives: Staff

Wanted: Fall move-in volunteers

Campus Living is seeking groups and organizations to serve as volunteers for this coming fall’s move-in from Wednesday, Aug. 15 through Friday, Aug. 17.

Move-in volunteers welcome residents and their families to campus while assisting them with carrying boxes, answering questions and providing directions. Additional volunteers assist with the check-in process at Minges Coliseum.

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Any size group can be accommodated, and individuals also are welcome to volunteer.

If your department, organization or group is interested in participating or would like more information, please arrange for a representative to contact Dave Hilbert in Campus Living at hilbertd17@ecu.edu or 737-1063.

ECU’s Harriot College recognizes exceptional staff

The Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Staff Council hosted its second annual Staff Awards and Recognition Ceremony May 11 in Harvey Hall. The event honors all dedicated THCAS staff members and recognizes the hard work they engage in on a day-to-day basis.

“Our college has the best staff at ECU,” said Dean William M. Downs. “We could not lead in all the categories in which we lead without them. I am really proud of this group.”

•Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.

Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.
(Photos by Rob Taylor)

During the ceremony, two staff members received Staff Excellence Awards, and one staff member received the Professional Development Grant. The awards acknowledge administrative or technical staff within the college who show exemplary professionalism and go above and beyond the requirements of their position, while the grant is awarded to a person who is actively pursuing career advancement within his or her field.

Julie Marik, research specialist in the Department of Biology, who serves as greenhouse manager and BIOL 1201 and 2251 lab coordinator, was awarded the Senior Staff Excellence Award. Chastidy Ridley, lead administrative support associate in the Department of Political Science, was awarded the Junior Staff Excellence Award. Chris Bonnerup, advanced research specialist in the Department of Physics and engineer for the ECU Accelerator Laboratory, was awarded the Professional Development Grant.

“I feel very fortunate to work with such a wonderful group of people every day, and I appreciate all they do for me,” said Marik, who is an alumna of ECU (’07) and has worked at the university for 10 years. “I work with a great group of fellow staff and amazing teachers and researchers who are doing very cool science.”

Ridley also is an ECU alumna (’14). She has served as the lead administrative associate in the Department of Political Science for nearly two years and worked with the staff in the Department of Biology from 2015-2016.

•Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

“I am humbled that I have colleagues who think so highly of me. It is always great to have reassurance that you are doing your best, and I feel awards like this do just that,” said Ridley. “Working within the college, I have gained great relationships and friendships. I also enjoy that I now get to supervise student office assistants, as I was once one myself. I find it rewarding that this comes full circle.”

Prior to the ceremony, many colleagues provided words of praise in their nominations of the candidates.

“Julie brings to her challenging position a remarkable combination of professionalism, expertise, strong work ethic, creativity, positive attitude and a desire to help and serve,” wrote a supporter of Marik. “Julie truly exemplifies our Pirate motto, Servire.”

Another nominator wrote, “Julie’s dedication to undergraduate success is evident by her excellent mentorship of TAs and her willingness to take on pedagogical changes to the laboratory courses she oversees.”

A colleague of Ridley’s commented, “Chastidy Ridley is a prime example of the Pirates that we like to see coming from East Carolina University. She was a dedicated student and student worker, and now we are fortunate to have her as a staff member for THCAS. She works tirelessly to ensure that her chair, faculty and students are assisted.”

“Ms. Ridley comes to work each day with a positive attitude and works to help raise the spirits of others around her,” commented another colleague. “She makes it clear she cares about others and will go out of her way to help students and faculty in any way she can.”

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Bonnerup, winner of the professional development grant, began his career with ECU in 2004 as a research instructor in radiation oncology at the Brody School of Medicine. He moved to Harriot College’s Department of Physics in 2013.

“I’m very thankful for the college to offer these funds, as specialized training and continuing education opportunities are not readily available in Greenville,” said Bonnerup.

Bonnerup will use his $1,200 grant to attend this year’s annual Symposium of Northeastern Accelerator Personnel in Madison, Wisconsin. The conference focuses on the interest of the people who use, build, maintain and repair particle accelerators for academic research and commercial purposes.

“This year’s meeting happens to be a great time to attend, in that the itinerary will include a VIP tour of National Electrostatics Corporation, the manufacturer of the ECU particle accelerator,” said Bonnerup. “The venue is also a great opportunity to meet with highly experienced users of these machines, discuss problems they have experienced and techniques to address and solve them. I hope to bring these skills and techniques back to ECU and use them to provide enhanced engineering and user support for the ECU accelerator lab.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Joe Dooley named head men’s basketball coach

After leading Florida Gulf Coast to five conference titles and five consecutive 20-win seasons, former ECU head men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley will return for a second stint at the helm of the Pirates’ program, athletics department officials announced Wednesday.

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. He was publicly introduced at a press conference Thursday at 11 a.m. inside Harvey Hall, which was streamed live on ecupirates.com.

Newly hired ECU men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley, left, accepts congratulations and a Pirate jersey with his name on it from Chancellor Cecil Staton and Dave Hart, special advisor for athletics, during a press conference on Thursday, April 5, 2018 in Greenville, N.C. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Newly hired ECU men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley, left, accepts congratulations and a Pirate jersey with his name on it from Chancellor Cecil Staton and Dave Hart, special advisor for athletics, during a press conference on Thursday, April 5, 2018 in Greenville, N.C. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

“Joe’s history with the ECU community and the success he’s had as a coach on and off the court will be a great asset for our men’s basketball program,” Chancellor Cecil P. Staton said. “Not only is he a great recruiter and a great basketball coach, but he also understands the importance of connecting with our alumni, fan base, student body, faculty, and community at large. He also gives proper priority to the academic success of student-athletes. I am delighted to welcome him back to Pirate Nation.”

Dooley finished his tenure at FGCU with a five-year record of 114-58 (.663), leading the Eagles to three Atlantic Sun (ASUN) Conference regular season championships, including their first-ever title in 2014, and two second-place finishes. He also helped them capture two conference tournament trophies and earn NCAA Tournament appearances in 2016 and 2017. The Eagles defeated Fairleigh Dickinson in the 2016 First Four to advance into the main bracket.

He is one of only 35 NCAA Division I coaches over the last five years with a winning percentage of over 66 percent and more than 110 victories.

Dooley was twice named ASUN Coach-of-the-Year (2017, 2018) as well as the 2017 NABC District III Coach-of-the-Year. He coached 10 all-conference selections, including 2018 ASUN Player-of-the-Year and Associated Press honorable mention All-America selection Brandon Goodwin as well as 2017 ASUN Defensive Player-of-the-Year Demetris Morant.

The Eagles participated in postseason play each of Dooley’s five seasons in Fort Myers, winning 21 or more games every year with two NIT and one CIT appearance in addition to a pair of trips to the NCAA Tournament.

FGCU finished among the top-25 nationally in field goal percentage three times, rebounds per game twice and was among the top-42 in scoring twice during Dooley’s tenure.

A renowned recruiter, three of Dooley’s recruiting classes at FGCU were ranked No. 1 in the ASUN with each of those classes ranked among the top-25 outside the Major 7 conferences (ACC, American, Big East, Big Ten, Big XII, PAC-12 and SEC).

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

Dooley also tutored 21 ASUN All-Academic performers during his first four seasons (the 2017-18 team will be announced later this spring).

He has a nine-year overall head coaching ledger of 171-110 (.608), including four years at ECU.

Dooley, who is the Pirates’ all-time Division I leader in winning percentage (.523), led ECU to an overall record of 57-52 during his four-year tenure that included back-to-back 17-win campaigns during his first two years. He won more games (44) in his first three years at the helm of the program than any of his predecessors.

In 1996-97, he led the Pirates to their only top-3 finish during their 15-year membership in the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA), tying for third with a 9-7 record led by Raphael Edwards, who was a two-time all-conference selection under Dooley’s tutelage.

Dooley was the youngest head coach in NCAA Division I men’s basketball at the age of 29 when he was promoted to ECU’s top basketball position in April of 1995.

Prior to being named head coach, Dooley served four seasons as coach Eddie Payne’s top assistant and was part of the Pirates’ staff that went to the 1993 NCAA Tournament by securing the CAA’s automatic bid.

Before coming to Greenville, Dooley and Payne served on the same staff as assistant coaches at South Carolina for three seasons.

Dooley began his coaching career as an assistant on the Gamecocks’ staff in 1988 under George Felton, working alongside Payne and three-time National Coach-of-the-Year Tubby Smith before accompanying Payne to Greenville.

He later served as an assistant coach at New Mexico (1999-02) and Wyoming (2002-03) before joining Bill Self, a four-time Big XII Coach-of-the-Year during their 10 campaigns together, for his inaugural season at Kansas in 2003-04. During his decade in Lawrence, the Jayhawks compiled a 300-58 record, including a 137-27 mark in the Big XII with nine regular-season crowns and six conference tournament titles.

He won a national championship as an assistant coach at Kansas in 2008 and helped the Jayhawks earn another Final Four berth in 2012.

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

In 2010, Dooley ranked first among all “High-Major Assistants” by Foxsports.com, which was up from his No. 6 ranking by the media outlet in 2008. In 2007, he was rated the fourth-best recruiter in the nation by Rivals.com. Dooley recruited or coached 14 NBA draft picks in his 10 years at KU, including nine first-round selections.

In 30 years as an assistant and head coach, Dooley has helped lead six different programs into the postseason, accumulated 657 victories with 14 NCAA Tournament appearances and seven NIT bids.

Dooley is a 1988 graduate of George Washington University in Washington, D.C., where he earned his bachelor’s degree in speech communications. A four-year basketball letterwinner at GW, he started his last two seasons and was elected a team captain as a senior.

A native of West Orange, N.J., Dooley and his wife, Tanya, have a son, Max.

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. Season ticket deposits cost only $50 to guarantee your seat inside Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. Those who place their deposits by April 10 will receive an invitation to attend a practice prior to the season. Only season ticket holders who place their deposit will be invited for the behind the scenes view of the Pirates and new head coach Joe Dooley. Season ticket prices and full season ticket packages will be available in August.

 

-Contact: Jody Jones, associate director of Athletics Communications, jonesjod@ecu.edu

LimeBike launches at ECU

One hundred LimeBikes will be deployed on ECU’s campus on Monday, March 12. Anyone can unlock and use the bikes using the LimeBike app. (Contributed photos)

One hundred LimeBikes will be deployed on ECU’s campus on Monday, March 12. Anyone can unlock and use the bikes using the LimeBike app. (Contributed photos)

Beginning Monday, March 12, 100 LimeBikes will be deployed on East Carolina University’s main campus, offering students, faculty and staff, and visitors a simple way to find and use a bicycle.

LimeBike is a bike sharing company based in California and currently operates in more than two dozen cities and several university campuses including N.C. State and UNC Greensboro. Each bike is equipped with GPS, wireless technology and self-activating locks, freeing them from the confines of designated docking areas.

“The dock-free network makes it easier for ECU students and faculty to explore the campus on two wheels,” said LimeBike public relations coordinator Emma Green.

There is no cost to ECU for the service; users access the bikes and pay using LimeBike’s iOS or Android smartphone application. The cost for students and others with an ECU email address is 50 cents per half-hour.

Dan Hemme, LimeBike’s operations manager for Greenville, said he anticipates deploying additional bikes as needed and expanding to include the health sciences campus. The City of Greenville is also working on an agreement to deploy the bikes citywide.

For students, faculty and staff with an ECU email address, the cost is 50 cents per half hour.

For students, faculty and staff with an ECU email address, the cost is 50 cents per half hour.

Users are encouraged to wear helmets, obey traffic rules and safe bicycle operation, and to park the bikes in or near existing bike racks, not on sidewalks or lawn areas. ECU currently has bike rack capacity for 1,780 bicycles in 72 designated bike rack areas, according to Joshua Rossnagel, external operation supervisor for ECU Parking and Transportation.

“One of the projects we are working on is having daily occupancy reports of the bike racks so that we can get accurate data on where additional racks may be needed,” he said. “LimeBike also has strong data metrics that will allow us to find trends in the ridership on campus.”

LimeBike representatives will be manning tables on campus during the launch to answer questions and distribute LimeBike information and swag, including helmets. To celebrate the launch, riders can use the promotional code “LIMEATECU” to receive $1 off their first two rides.

“Bringing LimeBike to ECU will help reduce bicycle congestion on campus while providing alternative transportation methods that will reduce our carbon footprint,” Rossnagel said. “LimeBike will allow faculty, staff, students and guests the opportunity to travel throughout campus without moving their vehicle from their original parking destination.”

For more information visit limebike.com.

 

-by Jules Norwood, ECU News Services

ECU honored as a breastfeeding friendly workplace

East Carolina University has been recognized as a Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace by the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition, a nonprofit that protects and promotes breastfeeding.

ECU was recognized for providing space for breastfeeding and time for working mothers to continue their lactation needs after returning to work. Kelli Russell is a teaching instructor in ECU’s Department of Health Education and Promotion and co-chair of the Women and Gender Advancement Council’s lactation committee. She said ECU has a total of nine lactation rooms on main campus and health sciences campus for nursing mothers.

View of the lactation room in Ross Hall (Contributed photo)

View of the lactation room in Ross Hall (Contributed photo)

“The private rooms give students, faculty, staff and campus visitors a safe, clean place to breastfeed or pump,” said Russell.

In addition to privacy, the spacious rooms include comfortable seating, outlets, towels and other items nursing mothers may need. Some of the rooms also include sinks and cold storage.

“Awareness is key,” Russell said. “Our website lists where the rooms are located and how to access the rooms.”

To receive the Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace award, a location must meet strict guidelines and have accommodations in place to support breastfeeding mothers as employees.

Last summer ECU also received recognition for participating in World Breastfeeding Week sponsored by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action.

Laupus Library recognizes 127 health sciences authors

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences gathered in an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 12th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 14, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library.

“It’s a privilege to host this event to honor the faculty and staff who’ve expanded and enriched the scholarly culture of our university and reputation of the division of health sciences,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It is truly inspiring to see this breadth of research.”

There were 127 authors honored this year, who published 440 qualified peer-reviewed publications including journal articles, book chapters and other creative works between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017. Twelve books were also published by 10 authors this year.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, recognized a record-breaking number of authors and publications from the college since the beginning of the awards program.

“It is so important to recognize our faculty scholars,” said Orlikoff. “We spend a lot of time talking about the importance of maximizing student success but we don’t do enough to recognize that it’s the scholarship and dedication of our faculty that makes student success possible.”

Authors from Laupus Library, the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, gave special remarks about the important role of the library’s systematic review services in the advancement of research. Lee has worked closely with Laupus librarians to successfully conduct and complete systematic reviews.

Lee’s work includes documenting health disparities for LGBT people, seeking to understand the origins of those disparities, and identifying and evaluating policy interventions to improve health equity. He also conducts studies of tobacco prevention and control with an eye towards public health policy and reduction of disparities.

“I think it’s perfect that Laupus Library hosts this recognition of scholarly achievements and I think that both in terms of making sure that we have access to the right information and to the skills and services I have access to as a user of the library,” he said.

“As the research enterprise grows at ECU, the library will expand its services to partner with our researchers in disseminating and publishing information,” said Ketterman. “We look forward to expanding the event in years to come to recognize our faculty and staff and their collective efforts to increase the knowledgebase of the health science.”

Registration for the 2017-18 author awards will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communication

ECU hosts 3-day symposium on central-eastern European politics

East Carolina University students and the local community recently had the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of foreign affairs and contribute to the international exchange of ideas and perceptions during a three-day symposium on central and eastern European politics.

The event, “Visegrad in the 21st Century,” sponsored by a grant from the International Visegrad Fund, was hosted Nov. 13-15 by the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Department of Political Science and the Office of Undergraduate Research.

Dr. Adam Eberhardt visited ECU through a grant awarded to professors in the THCAS Department of Political Science to increase student and public awareness about foreign affairs.<br /> (Contributed photos.)

Dr. Adam Eberhardt visited ECU through a grant awarded to professors in the THCAS Department of Political Science to increase student and public awareness about foreign affairs.
(Contributed photos.)

Two guest speakers from Poland and Czechia – two of the four central European states that make up the Visegrád group (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia), or Visegrád Four as they are also known – visited campus during the event.

The researchers presented on topics ranging from Polish-Russian relations and Russia’s foreign policy towards central-eastern Europe, to the Visegrád States in a broader context and the Czech people’s exile during the Cold War.

“Our overall goal was for ECU students to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and transformations the east-central European states have experienced in the last 25 years of democratic transitions, European Union and NATO membership, as well as these states’ changing foreign relations with Russia,” said Dr. Magda Giurcanu, teaching assistant professor of political science, who helped organize the event.

On Monday, Dr. Adam Eberhardt, director of the Center for Eastern Studies, a Polish think tank that undertakes independent research on the political, economic and social situation in central and eastern Europe, predominantly discussed Russia’s economy and foreign policy as well as Polish-Russian relations.

Eberhardt argued that Russia perceives the western European countries to be weak. However, Russia challenges the security of neighboring countries by asking for concessions without offering anything in return.

He also said there is little to no modernization because of the “law of the ruler,” and after 17 years in power, President Putin has no desire to tackle the challenges to the Russian state.

Dr. Martin Nekola visited ECU.

Dr. Martin Nekola visited ECU.

“Russia is not the Soviet Union of the Cold War,” said Eberhardt.

A roundtable discussion was held Tuesday afternoon with Eberhardt; ECU political science faculty Drs. Armin Krishnan and Giurcanu; and Dr. Martin Nekola, an independent scholar from Prague, whose research focuses on non-democratic regimes, the era of Communism, Czech communities abroad and the east-European, anti-communist exiles to the United States during the Cold War.

On Wednesday, Nekola gave a presentation on his research pertaining to the Czech migration, which began Feb. 20, 1948 and lasted until 1989. Many researchers disagree on the total number of Czech citizens who fled Czechia, but Nekola said 250,000 seems to be a realistic number. Many of the citizens traveled to refugee camps in Germany, Austria, Italy and France.

“The atmosphere was tense,” said Nekola, referring to the fear and frustration felt immediately following WWII.

As time passed, the people also began emigrating to Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada and the United States. Nekola’s research has traced a number of Czechian descendants to cities in the U.S. that have strong Czech communities, including Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, New York, St. Louis, and possibly Charlotte and New Salem, North Carolina.

Closing out the three-day symposium, students in the course presented research posters on topics that were covered throughout the semester. Attendees voted on the two best posters. First place and a $100 award went to Josiah Thornton, India Peele and Dwayne Lewis Jr. for “The Transition of Central Europe: The Fate of Visegrad,” and the second place award of $50 went to Natalie Best, Kaitlyn Rose and Josh Ziegler for “Slovakia and Hungary’s Case brought to the European Court of Justice: Legality of the Challenge.”

Drs. Nekola, Giurcanu, Eberhardt and Krishnan

Drs. Nekola, Giurcanu, Eberhardt and Krishnan.

One more guest lecturer associated with the International Visegrad Fund grant will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, in Howell, room N107. The presentation will feature Dr. Bartosz Rydlinski of Poland.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Brody dean launches staff initiative

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

Brody School of Medicine Dean Mark Stacy. (contributed photo)

The dean of ECU’s Brody School of Medicine, Dr. Mark Stacy, is seeking suggestions from Brody employees about how to “build a better Brody,” and he’s setting aside $100,000 to put their best ideas into practice.

The Brody Staff Leadership Initiative seeks to tap into the knowledge, experience and creativity of the medical school’s employees to improve office efficiency, morale, the work environment and the overall culture at Brody, Stacy said.

“Those employees who are closest to a process, who work in a certain area on a daily basis, are the ones who can best identify how to make things work better,” said Stacy. “I want to empower those people to influence positive change. This is their chance to make a difference.”

All Brody SHRA and CSS staff are eligible to submit a proposal. While employees are encouraged to work in groups to strengthen their requests, proposals from individuals will also be considered.

The deadline for entries is Dec. 15, 2017.

All submissions will be reviewed by a representative group of Brody staff and the Dean’s Administrative Leadership Team. Winners will be announced at a ceremony and celebration event Jan. 10.

All requests – and any questions – should be submitted to Gary Vanderpool, executive associate vice chancellor for health sciences administration and finance, at vanderpoolg@ecu.edu.

For the proposal guidelines and template, visit www.ecu.edu/med/better.

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communications

First-Generation College Celebration

First-generation students are defined broadly (neither parent has completed a four-year degree) or narrowly (neither parent has any postsecondary education).  With nearly one-third of freshman cohorts across the country designated first-generation, colleges and universities are building programs and resources specific to them and their needs.  ECU is no different.

According to the 2014 Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE) survey, between one-third and one-half of all first-time, full-time students entering ECU in Fall 2014 would be considered first generation students. For example, 55% of respondents to BCSSE indicated that no parent/guardian had a bachelor’s degree or higher and 33% indicated no parent had any schooling beyond high school. (Note: The 2017 BCSSE was administered during this past summer orientation).  

ECU is poised to continue intentional program for first-generation students and their families in order to address the challenges and needs of these students.  We begin by joining institutions around the country in celebrating first-generation college students, faculty, and staff on our campus.

Sponsored by NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and the American Association of Colleges & Universities (AACU), and ECU’s Division of Student Affairs, the inaugural First-Generation College Celebration is being celebrated nationally on November 8, 2017.  As a first-generation administrator, faculty, staff, and/or student, we invite you to join us in celebration.

Please respond at this link: https://ecu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2b0krEvnCxzQ7Bj

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mary Beth Corbin at corbinm@ecu.edu or 252-328-4173.

 

 

 

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