Category Archives: Staff

ECU taps executive director for Innovation and New Ventures

Mark Wdowik has been named the executive director of East Carolina University’s Office of Innovation and New Ventures.

Mark Wdowik has been named the executive director of East Carolina University’s Office of Innovation and New Ventures. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Mark Wdowik has been named the inaugural executive director for the newly created Office of Innovation and New Ventures at East Carolina University.

Wdowik joins ECU after a national search led by the university’s Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement.

The Office of Innovation and New Ventures oversees the university’s rapidly expanding efforts to discover, develop and commercialize ideas and inventions cultivated by ECU’s students, faculty and partners.

As the office’s executive director, Wdowik is responsible for leading ECU in its mission to become a national model of how to support student creativity and innovation. This includes growing and maturing the university’s new micro-business program and developing impact investment funds to support innovation and new venture creation at ECU through a philanthropic fund and a potential for a for-profit, equity-based investment fund.

“We want to continue to support a culture of creativity, design, entrepreneurship and innovation at ECU, building upon the great achievements and successes of the Miller School of Entrepreneurship as well as the offices of Community Engagement and Research and Regional Economic Development within REDE,” Wdowik said. “Creating vibrant commercialization and hands-on business development opportunities for students, faculty and partners is an area many universities struggle with. However, that provides ECU a real opportunity to move quickly and excel in this space for the benefit of the people in eastern North Carolina.”

Wdowik is tasked with helping grow the university’s micro-business program. The recently launched program will guide students through four years of entrepreneurship, innovation and business training at ECU, with students creating a business plan before executing their strategy in eastern North Carolina counties during their senior year. The program aims to provide needed services to rural regions, while providing students a systematic, mentor-led commercialization opportunity.

Additionally, Wdowik will explore the potential of an ECU impact investment fund to further support the development and commercialization of ECU’s innovations. Successful investment funds have previously been established at universities throughout the U.S. and abroad, including funds at New York University, the University of California and MIT. In 2016, at least 44 college-focused funds had been established.

“We’re receptive to all new ideas,” Wdowik said. “We’re not here to say ‘No’; we’re here to say ‘Yes, let’s find a way to make it work – whatever the ideas may be.’ That’s the message I want our students, faculty and partners to hear.”

Wdowik joins ECU after a 20-plus-year career in innovation development in higher education. Wdowik has extensive experience with technology transfer, commercialization, economic development, investment funds, industry partnerships, new product development and startups. He also worked in the private sector as the president and CEO of Critical Dimensions Inc., a consulting firm that helped small to large multinational corporations develop business strategies, form strategic partnerships and refine financial strategies.

Wdowik earned both his bachelor’s and master of science degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois. He holds two patents and has most recently served as the chair of the board for the Colorado Venture Capital Authority – managing two $25 million venture capital funds on behalf of the state of Colorado. Likewise, he served as chair of Innosphere – a statewide new business incubator formed in partnership between Colorado State University and the city of Fort Collins.

“As the only university in the state with a medical school, a dental school and a college of engineering, ECU has an unrealized potential to generate intellectual property that can be commercialized,” said Dr. Jay Golden, vice chancellor for REDE. “ECU has taken steps to provide outstanding resources for our students, faculty and partners who are interested in building businesses and helping communities thrive in eastern North Carolina. Mark will continue that trend, while providing even more opportunities for those partnering with ECU to capitalize on their novel ideas.”

Learn more about the Office of New Ventures online at https://rede.ecu.edu/innovation/. Contact Wdowik by email at wdowikm18@ecu.edu or by phone at 252-737-5558.

 

-Contact: Matt Smith, ECU News Services, smithmatt17@ecu.edu

Growth leads to parking challenges on campus

Watching the construction on and around East Carolina University’s campuses and seeing Greenville’s downtown area vibrant with new businesses is a sign of positive growth.

That growth has made parking and traveling around ECU more challenging. But a little planning will help make the experience smooth and safe.

ECU Transit provides more than 3 million rides each year to locations on and off campus. There are two apps students are requested to download, Nextbus and TransLoc. Nextbus provides real-time arrival predictions and rider alerts for students utilizing ECU buses, and TransLoc is used to schedule a SafeRide through ECU Transit. Students can always call 252-328-7433 to schedule a SafeRide.

Passengers board an ECU bus during new student orientation in June.

Passengers board an ECU bus during new student orientation in June. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

On main campus, students will notice that the Mendenhall/West End bus terminal is closed until summer of 2019 due to the extensive renovations taking place at nearby Greene Residence Hall. Those routes have moved to the new Main Campus Student Center bus terminal.

This summer, ECU Parking & Transportation adjusted parking on the Health Sciences campus to provide better access to the new Health Sciences Campus Student Center. Pay station parking provides students with greater flexibility if they are primarily in off-campus clinics and only visit campus a few times a semester. This is a less costly option than purchasing a full-year permit.

Additionally, the B4 student lots have been consolidated to make finding locations on campus easier.

“We did reduce the number of B4 permits to accommodate these changes, but that decision was based on lot usage data we collect throughout the year,” said Bill Koch, associate vice chancellor for Environmental Health and Campus Safety. “Significant changes in parking accommodations go through the university’s Parking & Transportation Committee that includes faculty, staff and student representatives.”

Students board an ECU bus during Pirates Aboard-Admitted Student Day.

Students board an ECU bus during Admitted Student Day.

Other parking zone designations were changed this summer on main campus. Officials stress the importance of checking the parking zone signs and which permits are valid at a given time. Some parking zones will allow additional permits in the evenings, most beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Commuter students who need parking in the evenings or on weekends may want to consider the new C2A permit. This gives them access to areas on main campus and the ability to park closer to some Health Sciences Campus facilities after 5:30 p.m.

Additional information to note:

  • Pay attention to signs. Parking lot zones have changed since last semester.
  • Purchase your parking permit as soon as possible to avoid tickets.
  • Register all vehicles that will use a parking permit.
  • Turning on your hazard lights does not allow you to park closer.
  • Pirate Express routes will serve the downtown area on Friday and Saturday nights. The Thursday night service was discontinued due to low ridership.

2018 Parking Zone Changes

 

-by Jamie Smith, ECU News Services

ECU Alert tests on Aug. 15, 16 and 17

East Carolina University will conduct tests of the ECU Alert emergency notification system Aug. 15 (noon), 16 (noon) and 17 (2 p.m.). 

The tests will assess multiple communication systems including the ECU homepage, email, indoor and outdoor loudspeakers, VOIP phone text and voice, SMS text messages, desktop pop-up notifications, and messages on digital signs. On Wednesday and Thursday, portions of the system will be tested, but not text messaging. All aspects of the ECU Alert system will be tested at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17.

People on campus will hear a voice message on their office telephones and on loudspeakers that will identify this as a test of the ECU Alert emergency notification system. Employees, students and parents will also receive ECU Alert test emails to registered accounts. Digital screens located throughout campus will carry a test message. Users who have registered for ECU Alert cell phone messages will receive one SMS text message on Friday at 2 p.m.

Campus computer users are reminded that the university has a pop-up notification system, AlertUs, which will fill the computer screen with the ECU Alert message when activated. After the users have read the message, clicking “Acknowledge” will close the warning.

Registration for cell phone messaging is available by selecting the register tab at alertinfo.ecu.edu

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to download the free safety app LiveSafe at ecu.edu/LiveSafe. LiveSafe allows users to discretely and anonymously report suspicious activity and safety concerns to ECU Police.

 

Wanted: Fall move-in volunteers

Campus Living is seeking groups and organizations to serve as volunteers for this coming fall’s move-in from Wednesday, Aug. 15 through Friday, Aug. 17.

Move-in volunteers welcome residents and their families to campus while assisting them with carrying boxes, answering questions and providing directions. Additional volunteers assist with the check-in process at Minges Coliseum.

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Volunteers help students move in at the start of the 2017 fall semester. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Any size group can be accommodated, and individuals also are welcome to volunteer.

If your department, organization or group is interested in participating or would like more information, please arrange for a representative to contact Dave Hilbert in Campus Living at hilbertd17@ecu.edu or 737-1063.

ECU’s Harriot College recognizes exceptional staff

The Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Staff Council hosted its second annual Staff Awards and Recognition Ceremony May 11 in Harvey Hall. The event honors all dedicated THCAS staff members and recognizes the hard work they engage in on a day-to-day basis.

“Our college has the best staff at ECU,” said Dean William M. Downs. “We could not lead in all the categories in which we lead without them. I am really proud of this group.”

•Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.

Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.
(Photos by Rob Taylor)

During the ceremony, two staff members received Staff Excellence Awards, and one staff member received the Professional Development Grant. The awards acknowledge administrative or technical staff within the college who show exemplary professionalism and go above and beyond the requirements of their position, while the grant is awarded to a person who is actively pursuing career advancement within his or her field.

Julie Marik, research specialist in the Department of Biology, who serves as greenhouse manager and BIOL 1201 and 2251 lab coordinator, was awarded the Senior Staff Excellence Award. Chastidy Ridley, lead administrative support associate in the Department of Political Science, was awarded the Junior Staff Excellence Award. Chris Bonnerup, advanced research specialist in the Department of Physics and engineer for the ECU Accelerator Laboratory, was awarded the Professional Development Grant.

“I feel very fortunate to work with such a wonderful group of people every day, and I appreciate all they do for me,” said Marik, who is an alumna of ECU (’07) and has worked at the university for 10 years. “I work with a great group of fellow staff and amazing teachers and researchers who are doing very cool science.”

Ridley also is an ECU alumna (’14). She has served as the lead administrative associate in the Department of Political Science for nearly two years and worked with the staff in the Department of Biology from 2015-2016.

•Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

“I am humbled that I have colleagues who think so highly of me. It is always great to have reassurance that you are doing your best, and I feel awards like this do just that,” said Ridley. “Working within the college, I have gained great relationships and friendships. I also enjoy that I now get to supervise student office assistants, as I was once one myself. I find it rewarding that this comes full circle.”

Prior to the ceremony, many colleagues provided words of praise in their nominations of the candidates.

“Julie brings to her challenging position a remarkable combination of professionalism, expertise, strong work ethic, creativity, positive attitude and a desire to help and serve,” wrote a supporter of Marik. “Julie truly exemplifies our Pirate motto, Servire.”

Another nominator wrote, “Julie’s dedication to undergraduate success is evident by her excellent mentorship of TAs and her willingness to take on pedagogical changes to the laboratory courses she oversees.”

A colleague of Ridley’s commented, “Chastidy Ridley is a prime example of the Pirates that we like to see coming from East Carolina University. She was a dedicated student and student worker, and now we are fortunate to have her as a staff member for THCAS. She works tirelessly to ensure that her chair, faculty and students are assisted.”

“Ms. Ridley comes to work each day with a positive attitude and works to help raise the spirits of others around her,” commented another colleague. “She makes it clear she cares about others and will go out of her way to help students and faculty in any way she can.”

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Bonnerup, winner of the professional development grant, began his career with ECU in 2004 as a research instructor in radiation oncology at the Brody School of Medicine. He moved to Harriot College’s Department of Physics in 2013.

“I’m very thankful for the college to offer these funds, as specialized training and continuing education opportunities are not readily available in Greenville,” said Bonnerup.

Bonnerup will use his $1,200 grant to attend this year’s annual Symposium of Northeastern Accelerator Personnel in Madison, Wisconsin. The conference focuses on the interest of the people who use, build, maintain and repair particle accelerators for academic research and commercial purposes.

“This year’s meeting happens to be a great time to attend, in that the itinerary will include a VIP tour of National Electrostatics Corporation, the manufacturer of the ECU particle accelerator,” said Bonnerup. “The venue is also a great opportunity to meet with highly experienced users of these machines, discuss problems they have experienced and techniques to address and solve them. I hope to bring these skills and techniques back to ECU and use them to provide enhanced engineering and user support for the ECU accelerator lab.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Joe Dooley named head men’s basketball coach

After leading Florida Gulf Coast to five conference titles and five consecutive 20-win seasons, former ECU head men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley will return for a second stint at the helm of the Pirates’ program, athletics department officials announced Wednesday.

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. He was publicly introduced at a press conference Thursday at 11 a.m. inside Harvey Hall, which was streamed live on ecupirates.com.

Newly hired ECU men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley, left, accepts congratulations and a Pirate jersey with his name on it from Chancellor Cecil Staton and Dave Hart, special advisor for athletics, during a press conference on Thursday, April 5, 2018 in Greenville, N.C. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

Newly hired ECU men’s basketball coach Joe Dooley, left, accepts congratulations and a Pirate jersey with his name on it from Chancellor Cecil Staton and Dave Hart, special advisor for athletics, during a press conference on Thursday, April 5, 2018 in Greenville, N.C. (Photo by Rhett Butler)

“Joe’s history with the ECU community and the success he’s had as a coach on and off the court will be a great asset for our men’s basketball program,” Chancellor Cecil P. Staton said. “Not only is he a great recruiter and a great basketball coach, but he also understands the importance of connecting with our alumni, fan base, student body, faculty, and community at large. He also gives proper priority to the academic success of student-athletes. I am delighted to welcome him back to Pirate Nation.”

Dooley finished his tenure at FGCU with a five-year record of 114-58 (.663), leading the Eagles to three Atlantic Sun (ASUN) Conference regular season championships, including their first-ever title in 2014, and two second-place finishes. He also helped them capture two conference tournament trophies and earn NCAA Tournament appearances in 2016 and 2017. The Eagles defeated Fairleigh Dickinson in the 2016 First Four to advance into the main bracket.

He is one of only 35 NCAA Division I coaches over the last five years with a winning percentage of over 66 percent and more than 110 victories.

Dooley was twice named ASUN Coach-of-the-Year (2017, 2018) as well as the 2017 NABC District III Coach-of-the-Year. He coached 10 all-conference selections, including 2018 ASUN Player-of-the-Year and Associated Press honorable mention All-America selection Brandon Goodwin as well as 2017 ASUN Defensive Player-of-the-Year Demetris Morant.

The Eagles participated in postseason play each of Dooley’s five seasons in Fort Myers, winning 21 or more games every year with two NIT and one CIT appearance in addition to a pair of trips to the NCAA Tournament.

FGCU finished among the top-25 nationally in field goal percentage three times, rebounds per game twice and was among the top-42 in scoring twice during Dooley’s tenure.

A renowned recruiter, three of Dooley’s recruiting classes at FGCU were ranked No. 1 in the ASUN with each of those classes ranked among the top-25 outside the Major 7 conferences (ACC, American, Big East, Big Ten, Big XII, PAC-12 and SEC).

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

Dooley, who was ECU’s head coach from 1995 to 1999, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

Dooley also tutored 21 ASUN All-Academic performers during his first four seasons (the 2017-18 team will be announced later this spring).

He has a nine-year overall head coaching ledger of 171-110 (.608), including four years at ECU.

Dooley, who is the Pirates’ all-time Division I leader in winning percentage (.523), led ECU to an overall record of 57-52 during his four-year tenure that included back-to-back 17-win campaigns during his first two years. He won more games (44) in his first three years at the helm of the program than any of his predecessors.

In 1996-97, he led the Pirates to their only top-3 finish during their 15-year membership in the Colonial Athletic Association (CAA), tying for third with a 9-7 record led by Raphael Edwards, who was a two-time all-conference selection under Dooley’s tutelage.

Dooley was the youngest head coach in NCAA Division I men’s basketball at the age of 29 when he was promoted to ECU’s top basketball position in April of 1995.

Prior to being named head coach, Dooley served four seasons as coach Eddie Payne’s top assistant and was part of the Pirates’ staff that went to the 1993 NCAA Tournament by securing the CAA’s automatic bid.

Before coming to Greenville, Dooley and Payne served on the same staff as assistant coaches at South Carolina for three seasons.

Dooley began his coaching career as an assistant on the Gamecocks’ staff in 1988 under George Felton, working alongside Payne and three-time National Coach-of-the-Year Tubby Smith before accompanying Payne to Greenville.

He later served as an assistant coach at New Mexico (1999-02) and Wyoming (2002-03) before joining Bill Self, a four-time Big XII Coach-of-the-Year during their 10 campaigns together, for his inaugural season at Kansas in 2003-04. During his decade in Lawrence, the Jayhawks compiled a 300-58 record, including a 137-27 mark in the Big XII with nine regular-season crowns and six conference tournament titles.

He won a national championship as an assistant coach at Kansas in 2008 and helped the Jayhawks earn another Final Four berth in 2012.

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. (Photo by Savanna Elkins)

In 2010, Dooley ranked first among all “High-Major Assistants” by Foxsports.com, which was up from his No. 6 ranking by the media outlet in 2008. In 2007, he was rated the fourth-best recruiter in the nation by Rivals.com. Dooley recruited or coached 14 NBA draft picks in his 10 years at KU, including nine first-round selections.

In 30 years as an assistant and head coach, Dooley has helped lead six different programs into the postseason, accumulated 657 victories with 14 NCAA Tournament appearances and seven NIT bids.

Dooley is a 1988 graduate of George Washington University in Washington, D.C., where he earned his bachelor’s degree in speech communications. A four-year basketball letterwinner at GW, he started his last two seasons and was elected a team captain as a senior.

A native of West Orange, N.J., Dooley and his wife, Tanya, have a son, Max.

The ECU ticket office will be accepting season ticket deposits for the 2018-19 men’s basketball campaign beginning Thursday. Season ticket deposits cost only $50 to guarantee your seat inside Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. Those who place their deposits by April 10 will receive an invitation to attend a practice prior to the season. Only season ticket holders who place their deposit will be invited for the behind the scenes view of the Pirates and new head coach Joe Dooley. Season ticket prices and full season ticket packages will be available in August.

 

-Contact: Jody Jones, associate director of Athletics Communications, jonesjod@ecu.edu

LimeBike launches at ECU

One hundred LimeBikes will be deployed on ECU’s campus on Monday, March 12. Anyone can unlock and use the bikes using the LimeBike app. (Contributed photos)

One hundred LimeBikes will be deployed on ECU’s campus on Monday, March 12. Anyone can unlock and use the bikes using the LimeBike app. (Contributed photos)

Beginning Monday, March 12, 100 LimeBikes will be deployed on East Carolina University’s main campus, offering students, faculty and staff, and visitors a simple way to find and use a bicycle.

LimeBike is a bike sharing company based in California and currently operates in more than two dozen cities and several university campuses including N.C. State and UNC Greensboro. Each bike is equipped with GPS, wireless technology and self-activating locks, freeing them from the confines of designated docking areas.

“The dock-free network makes it easier for ECU students and faculty to explore the campus on two wheels,” said LimeBike public relations coordinator Emma Green.

There is no cost to ECU for the service; users access the bikes and pay using LimeBike’s iOS or Android smartphone application. The cost for students and others with an ECU email address is 50 cents per half-hour.

Dan Hemme, LimeBike’s operations manager for Greenville, said he anticipates deploying additional bikes as needed and expanding to include the health sciences campus. The City of Greenville is also working on an agreement to deploy the bikes citywide.

For students, faculty and staff with an ECU email address, the cost is 50 cents per half hour.

For students, faculty and staff with an ECU email address, the cost is 50 cents per half hour.

Users are encouraged to wear helmets, obey traffic rules and safe bicycle operation, and to park the bikes in or near existing bike racks, not on sidewalks or lawn areas. ECU currently has bike rack capacity for 1,780 bicycles in 72 designated bike rack areas, according to Joshua Rossnagel, external operation supervisor for ECU Parking and Transportation.

“One of the projects we are working on is having daily occupancy reports of the bike racks so that we can get accurate data on where additional racks may be needed,” he said. “LimeBike also has strong data metrics that will allow us to find trends in the ridership on campus.”

LimeBike representatives will be manning tables on campus during the launch to answer questions and distribute LimeBike information and swag, including helmets. To celebrate the launch, riders can use the promotional code “LIMEATECU” to receive $1 off their first two rides.

“Bringing LimeBike to ECU will help reduce bicycle congestion on campus while providing alternative transportation methods that will reduce our carbon footprint,” Rossnagel said. “LimeBike will allow faculty, staff, students and guests the opportunity to travel throughout campus without moving their vehicle from their original parking destination.”

For more information visit limebike.com.

 

-by Jules Norwood, ECU News Services

ECU honored as a breastfeeding friendly workplace

East Carolina University has been recognized as a Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace by the North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition, a nonprofit that protects and promotes breastfeeding.

ECU was recognized for providing space for breastfeeding and time for working mothers to continue their lactation needs after returning to work. Kelli Russell is a teaching instructor in ECU’s Department of Health Education and Promotion and co-chair of the Women and Gender Advancement Council’s lactation committee. She said ECU has a total of nine lactation rooms on main campus and health sciences campus for nursing mothers.

View of the lactation room in Ross Hall (Contributed photo)

View of the lactation room in Ross Hall (Contributed photo)

“The private rooms give students, faculty, staff and campus visitors a safe, clean place to breastfeed or pump,” said Russell.

In addition to privacy, the spacious rooms include comfortable seating, outlets, towels and other items nursing mothers may need. Some of the rooms also include sinks and cold storage.

“Awareness is key,” Russell said. “Our website lists where the rooms are located and how to access the rooms.”

To receive the Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace award, a location must meet strict guidelines and have accommodations in place to support breastfeeding mothers as employees.

Last summer ECU also received recognition for participating in World Breastfeeding Week sponsored by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action.

Laupus Library recognizes 127 health sciences authors

Faculty and staff from across East Carolina University’s Division of Health Sciences gathered in an annual celebration of research and scholarship.

The William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library held its 12th Health Sciences Author Recognition Awards at the Hilton Greenville on Nov. 14, sponsored by the Friends of Laupus Library.

“It’s a privilege to host this event to honor the faculty and staff who’ve expanded and enriched the scholarly culture of our university and reputation of the division of health sciences,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “It is truly inspiring to see this breadth of research.”

There were 127 authors honored this year, who published 440 qualified peer-reviewed publications including journal articles, book chapters and other creative works between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017. Twelve books were also published by 10 authors this year.

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Nicholas Benson, Vice Dean for the Brody School of Medicine presents a Laupus medallion to book author, Roger Russell, Assistant Director of User Services for Laupus Library. (Photo by Layne Carpenter)

Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean for the College of Allied Health Sciences, recognized a record-breaking number of authors and publications from the college since the beginning of the awards program.

“It is so important to recognize our faculty scholars,” said Orlikoff. “We spend a lot of time talking about the importance of maximizing student success but we don’t do enough to recognize that it’s the scholarship and dedication of our faculty that makes student success possible.”

Authors from Laupus Library, the Brody School of Medicine, the College of Nursing and the School of Dental Medicine were also recognized.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, gave special remarks about the important role of the library’s systematic review services in the advancement of research. Lee has worked closely with Laupus librarians to successfully conduct and complete systematic reviews.

Lee’s work includes documenting health disparities for LGBT people, seeking to understand the origins of those disparities, and identifying and evaluating policy interventions to improve health equity. He also conducts studies of tobacco prevention and control with an eye towards public health policy and reduction of disparities.

“I think it’s perfect that Laupus Library hosts this recognition of scholarly achievements and I think that both in terms of making sure that we have access to the right information and to the skills and services I have access to as a user of the library,” he said.

“As the research enterprise grows at ECU, the library will expand its services to partner with our researchers in disseminating and publishing information,” said Ketterman. “We look forward to expanding the event in years to come to recognize our faculty and staff and their collective efforts to increase the knowledgebase of the health science.”

Registration for the 2017-18 author awards will begin in February. More information about the annual awards ceremony – including a complete listing of this year’s published authors – is available online at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/HSAR/.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communication

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