Category Archives: Homosexuality

LGBTQ Vulnerability

Link to article: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/06/13/sarah-mcbride-gay-survivors-helped-launch-me-too-but-rates-lgbt-abuse-largely-overlooked/692094002/

Sexual assault is a form of violence that disproportionately affects women and minority groups. This can be seen from the rates of sexual assault on LGBTQ people. It’s no shock to me that simply coming out increases one’s risk for sexual assault. The article lists and explains the risk factors LGBTQ people experience including greater risk of alcohol and drug use, homelessness, poverty and lack of employment opportunities. It also explains the role myths about LGBTQ people play in the disproportionate rates of violence.

I found this article interesting because we give the #MeToo movement so much credit for allowing victims to share their stories and find support. However, the stories that get the most attention are those of prominent straight white women and a powerful male assaulter. I think the #MeToo movement is shifting in the right direction, but are we doing enough to allow everyone’s story to be heard?

Why is it that despite the staggering statistics on the rates of sexual assaults on minority groups the stories that get the most attention are those of primarily straight white female celebrities?

The Pride Shield

This video was released on May 15th, for the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. The video begins with audio of several reports of anti-LGBTQ violence from around the world. It serves as a reminder that in various parts of the world LGBTQ people are still the targets of prejudice and violence. The Pride Shield was created to show that if we stand together we can end the violence. It consists of 193 pride flags, one for every country in the world.

I believe the Pride Shield is an interesting concept and effectively symbolizes a solution to ending the violence. Imagine if all 193 countries took a stand against anti-LGBTQ violence, as the flags symbolically do in the video.

Do you believe the Pride Shield could ever be implemented? What cultural obstacles would we face if we tried to unite all 193 countries against anti-LGBTQ violence?

US Supreme Court backs Colorado baker’s gay wedding cake snub

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-44361162

 

Personally, I feel that businesses, regardless of the goods or services provided, should be able to make decisions about whom to serve/service based on their own religious beliefs. I think that this couple chose to elevate this issue way beyond what was necessary, if you don’t like a business owner and their beliefs – why do you even want to give them your business? Perhaps I am looking at this situation from too much of a simplified point of view, but I think that it’s as simple as the signs you see on businesses everyday: “No shirt, no shoes, no service.” If business can turn people away because of what they are wearing, why should they not be able to refuse service to someone based on their strongly held religious beliefs?

As this has been a huge topic of discussion lately and I just wanted to see what others thought about it. Do you agree with the ruling? Why or why not?

Violent Deaths of LGBT people in Brazil hit all-time high

Hi everyone, I chose this article this week particularly because in my gender-based violence class’ lecture we were discussing homophobic violence and this struck my interest. This article came based upon some statistics that were taken in 2017. According to this article there were at least 445 LGBT Brazilians that died as victims of homophobic violence in 2017.

The number 445 was broken down into 387 murders and 58 suicides. Because Brazil is already known as a violent country, Homophobia is not something that the laws are enforced against at all. In this country, LGBT community members were treated like animals because “gay people” were seen as the devil. Most homophobic individuals even believed that LGBT members can be beaten straight.

My question for everyone is, shouldn’t there be policies enforced against homophobic violence in Brazil? It is not fair that these citizens think they can beat someone “straight.”

Cowie, Sam. The Guardian. Violent deaths of LGBT people in Brazil hit all-time high. Guardian News and Media. January 22, 2018. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/22/brazil-lgbt-violence-deaths-all-time-high-new-research. June 03, 2018.

Pop Star Identifies As Pansexual

Pop star Miley Cyrus recently revealed to several publications that she considers herself to be gender fluid and pansexual, claiming that she doesn’t label herself as neither boy nor girl and doesn’t limit herself to those labels when choosing romantic partners.

Pansexuality is not new, as experts say there have always been people who fall within the realm, but the term is unfamiliar to much of the public.  By opening up about her own intimate choices, Miley has opened the minds of many millennials and drawn the ire of many less open minded individuals.

Either way, she has at least brought awareness to a topic that we’ll certainly become more familiar with in the future.

https://www.yahoo.com/health/miley-cyrus-identifies-as-pansexual-what-does-127797473807.html

Kansas’ Anti-Gay Segregation Bill

Words cannot express how much this angers me. I found this article on Tumblr recently, and couldn’t believe it at first. A few days later and I am still in shock that this is really happening. Gay people in Kansas can now be denied service, anywhere, such as in movie theaters, hotels, and public schools. If a gay person calls the police, the police can refuse to help them. This sickens me. -Tamara Kovacs

http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2014/02/13/kansas_anti_gay_segregation_bill_is_an_abomination.html

S. Korea court upholds military ban on gay behavior

The following is the newspaper content I quoted from the Yahoo! News.

SEOUL (AFP) – South Korea’s Constitutional Court on Thursday upheld a military law banning homosexual behaviour, saying the need to maintain discipline takes precedence over individual sexual freedom.

In a 5-4 split decision, the court ruled that the military criminal code which punishes homosexual behaviour with up to one year in prison is constitutional.

“The legal code cannot be seen as discrimination against gays because such behaviour, if left unchecked, might result in subordinates being harassed by superiors in military barracks,” it said in a statement.

The law’s purpose was to ensure discipline within the whole military organisation, the court said.

The ruling came after an army military court filed a petition with the Constitutional Court. It asked whether the military criminal code, written in 1962, was discriminatory against gay soldiers and thus unconstitutional.

Homosexuality is not illegal under the civil legal code.

Still, we have long ways to go.

Hyun Woo

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110331/lf_afp/skoreamilitarylawsex_20110331143015

Have A Gay Old Time – Liberating Homosexuality In The Middle East

Thought this article and video is very interesting. I just finished a paper for Dr. Russell’s class on homosexuality in the Middle East, and I talked about how organizations that are formed to fight for gay rights in the Middle East don’t usually last more than a few days. I thought it was fascinating the way they came up with doing this website:

It’s not easy being gay in the Middle East. If you get caught, you could face the death penalty, flogging, or an extended jail sentence – not to mention the probable spurning from your family and friends. It’s a lonely, dangerous life for many homosexuals in that part of the world.

But where there is fear, there is also courage. Mideast Youth – an all-volunteer team with representatives from countries like Bahrain, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Iran, Syria, and Tunisia – is committed to working “against repression, discrimination and persecution” in the Middle East, and homosexuality is one issue that has recently hit their radar.

The group have created Ahwaa – “A safe space to debate LGBTQ-related issues in the Middle East.” It’s essentially an anonymous forum that utilizes game mechanics to allow legitimate users to get deeper into the site, while keeping the trolls and the haters at the surface, because the more the Ahwaa community like what you have to say, the better access you get.

They are trying to make it as inclusive as possible, by inviting people of all sexual persuasions to participate, and by making it bilingual (Arabic and English), thereby allowing non-Arabs to offer their perspectives as well.

With all the changes that have been taking place in the Middle East recently, the time is ripe to address issues there that are as controversial as this. And now you can be a part of it all.

What are you waiting for?

Here’s the introductory video:Ahwaa.org: A space to debate LGBTQ-related issues in the Middle East